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ISBN:0850528372
Author: Tim Saunders
ISBN13: 978-0850528374
Title: Hell's Highway: U.S. 101st Airborne -1944 (Battleground Europe)
Format: azw lit rtf lrf
ePUB size: 1689 kb
FB2 size: 1211 kb
DJVU size: 1537 kb
Language: English
Category: Europe
Publisher: Pen and Sword Military (May 18, 2009)
Pages: 160

Hell's Highway: U.S. 101st Airborne -1944 (Battleground Europe) by Tim Saunders



Hell's Highway, which covers the dramatic events on the Eindhoven-Veghel stretch of highway in Holland on 10-26 September 1944, is one of the better Battleground Europe titles. It was the battle for the highway that ultimately decided the outcome of the Allies daring but risky Operation Market-Garden. Once the additional planned volumes on Nijmegen and the Island are completed, this volume on Hell's Highway will be part of an important new historical trilogy that breaks the campaign down into distinct phases. This volume consists of 11 chapters, starting with the coup de main seizure of "Joe's Bridge" by the Irish Guards on 10 September 1944.

Hell's Highway is the dramatic name given to the vital stretch of road that the British 3rd Guards Armoured. Start by marking Hell's Highway: . 101st Airborne -1944 (Battleground Europe:Market Garden) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Ot/Iel' guides ill tile Battlegroll/ld Ellrope Series: Walking the Salient by Paul Reed Ypres, Sanctuary Wood and Hooge by Nigel Cave Ypres Tim Kilvert-Jones. Somme - High Wood by Terry Carter Somme· German-A-dvance 1918 by Michael Stedman Somme - Combles by Paul Reed Somme - Beaucourt by Michael Renshaw Walking Arras by Paul Reed WW2 Boulogne by John Cooksey WW2 Market Garden - Hell's Highway by Tim Saunders Poets at War: Sassoon & Graves by Helen McPhail and Philip Guest Wa. of the Roses - Wakcficld/Towton by.

The Germans pushed forward, intent on moving past Neunan to cut off the major road, dubbed Hell's. This section contains 473 words (approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page). Browse all BookRags Study Guides.

As the 101st Airboren Division secured Eindhoven and Veghel at the start of Operation Market-Garden, its battles in Holland were only just beginning. In broad daylight the three parachute infantry regiments of the 101st Airborne Division descended with amazing accuracy on designated drop zones in Nazi-occupied Holland. It was September 17, 1944, and the Screaming Eagles were to play a vital role in Operation Market-Garden. Disorganized German units retreated before them.

GUILLEMONT: Somme (Battleground Europe)Documents. Brothers in Arms: Hell's Highway (Manual)Documents. Battleground Europe - Normandy Omaha BeachDocuments. Operation Market-Garden: Ultra Intelligence IgnoredDocuments. Anzio: Italy 1944 (Battleground Europe)Documents. Battleground Europe - AnzioDocuments.

Hell's Highway is the dramatic name given to the vital stretch of road that the British 3rd Guards Armoured Division had to advance down rapidly on their route to relieve the American Paras (82d Airborne) at Nijmegen and the British I st Airborne Division at Arnhem. Adopting the clear and successful style of Battleground works this book relies on personal accounts to embellish this dramatic story.
Reviews: 6
Silverbrew
Is another excellent piece by “ Battleground” from Pen & Sword. This particular text in the series edited by Nigel Cave is authored by Tim Saunders. It is made up of part travel guide for the visitor; text to understand the events; divisional historian excerpts; and personal written accounts of this multi-day failed cognitive dissonant plan of Montgomery to leap-frog Nazi defenses during the fall of 1944. The book takes the reader through the tactical, operational, and strategic issues of the battle providing personnel accounts and names. Copious photographs and maps abound the text and are helpful in the understanding of what took place. Coupled with the 1977 film “ A Bridge Too Far,” the student of this battle obtains a good understanding of the risk of this endeavor by the Allied Forces.

Last year at this time I participated in a three day WW II tour of this battlefield led by Jan a 79 year old Nijmegen native and witness to the battle. Although, I saw and walked the ground of the battle this easy to read book is in far more detail and promotes understanding of what actually took place. If you are interested in the 82nd successful assault on the Nijmegen Bridge by Major Julian Cook or the the failed assault on the Arnhem Bridge by Col. John Frost's unit you will be disappointed. The book centers on what transpired on the highway corridor. On my return to this area I will surely have this text to reread.
Mogelv
Lots of detail on the 101st airborne part of the Operation Market Garden in September 1944
It's so easy
This was a great tour book. I was in Eindhoven this past June and used the book in a bicycle tour of of the Eindhoven, Son, and Best areas. Very useful.
Malarad
Hell's Highway, which covers the dramatic events on the Eindhoven-Veghel stretch of highway in Holland on 10-26 September 1944, is one of the better Battleground Europe titles. It was the battle for the highway that ultimately decided the outcome of the Allies daring but risky Operation Market-Garden. Not only does this volume cover a neglected aspect of Operation Market-Garden in great detail, but the author's research, writing style and analysis provides a superb addition to the study of this campaign. The supporting photographs, maps and diagrams are also excellent. Once the additional planned volumes on Nijmegen and the Island are completed, this volume on Hell's Highway will be part of an important new historical trilogy that breaks the campaign down into distinct phases.
This volume consists of 11 chapters, starting with the coup de main seizure of "Joe's Bridge" by the Irish Guards on 10 September 1944. The relatively easy seizure of this vital bridge on the Dutch-Belgian border served to entice Field Marshal Montgomery to attempt even more dramatic operations in order to bring the war to a rapid conclusion. The manner in which Joe's Bridge was seized and its impact upon the planning of Market-Garden is often ignored in standard histories of the campaign, but is covered in this book's second chapter. Beginning with the third chapter, the author shifts to a detailed dissection of Operation Market-Garden in the US 101st Airborne Division and British Guards Armored Division sectors. Individual chapters cover the initial XXX Corps attack, the 101st landings near Son, the often-ignored battle near Best, actions around St. Oedenrode, Veghel and Schijndel, and the German raids that temporarily cut the highway. A detailed order of battle for the British Guards armored division and the US 101st Infantry Division is also provided. Overall, the volume is well put-together and flows smoothly without distraction. Although intended also as a battlefield guide, the author does not allow this requirement to subvert the historical value of his narrative by endless digressions on tourist highlights.
One of the great values of this volume is the attention devoted to the initial XXX Corps attack, which is often glossed over in most accounts in favor of actions at Arnhem. Particularly useful is the overlay depicting the XXX Corps artillery prepatory fire plan; although the 35-minute prep was fired by 350 guns most were lighter 25-pounders since the heavy corps artillery had not caught up to the front yet. Consequently, the initial British prep fire was not as heavy as it should have been. The supporting attacks launched by British 8th and 12th Corps on either side of Hell's Highway are also discussed in this account, although not in great detail. However the most controversial aspect of this volume is the timing of the XXX Corp's starting H-Hour and the corps' premature stop on the first night. The author tends to let Horrocks, the corps commander, off easily by stating that in retrospect, an H-Hour set at 1435 hours was too late in the day and that XXX Corps had little choice but to stop at sunset at 1847 hours. Actually, these explanations appear as little more than a face-saving effort. XXX Corps had been in contact with the German forces around "Joe's Bridge" for seven days prior to the launching of Market-Garden and the British had made little effort to exploit their bridgehead. Even at the time, the Americans felt that the ground phase could have commenced before paratroopers actually started hitting the ground. Horrocks wasted valuable daylight hours because he half expected the operation to be delayed by bad weather over England. After ripping through the outer layer of the thin German defenses along the highway, the British used the loss of 10 out of 200 tanks and the approach of darkness as an excuse to call it a day. Stopping one hour prior to sunset was certainly not the kind of decision one would expect from bold armor leaders. Instead, the Germans used the time to hastily throw together a new blocking force that further delayed XXX Corps on D+1. While most writers tend to blame the operation's ultimate failure on events at Son or Nijmegen, it is apparent that the ground-phase of Garden got off to a bad start.
This volume also has good examples of British armor-US paratrooper joint actions, which are often ignored in other accounts. Typically, most American-written accounts of the campaign tend to depict British armor as timidly led, ineffective and prone to walking into German anti-tank ambushes. While incidents of this sort did occur, American accounts tend to underrate the number of times that British tanks saved US paratroopers from being overrun. One interesting incident detailed here covers an action near Schijndel on 19 September 1944, when a single British Sherman tank operated by only two crewmen saved the US 1/502nd Airborne from a vicious German counterattack. The limping British tank, commanded by a corporal, destroyed several German antiaircraft guns and allowed the US paratroopers to break contact. The attachment of a British tank battalion to the 101st Airborne once the ground link-up occurred is also often ignored. On the other side, German objectives and dispositions are also well covered.
The only negative aspect of this book is the lack of a bibliography or any notes on sources for the numerous first-person accounts. It is obvious that the author has used other secondary sources, such as Kershaw's It Never Snows in September and Ambrose's Band of Brothers. Otherwise, this volume is a valuable addition to any reader interested in a detailed account of the initial ground phase of Market-Garden.
RUL
Excellent thanks
Usaxma
I prefer less detail and more personal information about the soldiers point of view