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ISBN:9748303683
Author: Brett Dakin
ISBN13: 978-9748303680
Title: Another Quiet American: Stories of Life in Laos
Format: lrf txt lrf docx
ePUB size: 1488 kb
FB2 size: 1987 kb
DJVU size: 1816 kb
Language: English
Category: Asia
Publisher: Asia Books; Later Printing Used edition (October 2003)
Pages: 296

Another Quiet American: Stories of Life in Laos by Brett Dakin



Another Quiet American book. The front cover promised ‘Stories of life in Laos’. I didn’t even know where to find Laos on the map. It was then that my eye caught the quote at the top of the page.

Brett Dakin's book is to Vientiane, Laos what Peter Hessler's book "Rivertown" was to Fuling, China. In my opinion, they are both classics. Another Quiet American is a wonderful read that I didn't want to end. Dakin's story telling, observations and wit made this a most enjoyable read. My only criticism is that Dakin hasn't written another book. The description of life in Vientiane as an expat in the late 90s is beautifully scripted and contains insight still relevant to any further study of Laos and its history or simply pre-travel prep. One person found this helpful.

Brett Dakin spent two years working in Laos and returned to the States a changed man. In Another Quiet American, he takes you through the corridors of power and the living rooms of the poor in Laos. I recently been to Laos early 2004, it was nice to compare my experience with that of Mr. Dakins, being that we are as he put it, "in the same age group. By the time Mr. Dakins had his experience in Laos, things have changed very dramatically since his tenure, so its not an exact comparison, (myself being Lao-American).

Another Quiet American. The other quiet American of the title is not the author or a Graham Greene character, but a retired Vietnam war pilot called Joe, a long-term Laos resident who has a love-hate relationship with the country

The Quiet American study guide contains a biography of Graham Greene, literature essays, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. The Quiet American essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of The Quiet American by Graham Greene. The Quiet American - Greene and the Cold War Mindset. Lesson Plan for The Quiet American.

Brett Dakin is the author of Another Quiet American: Stories of Life in Laos. He is also the chair of Legacies of War, a Washington-based non-profit organisation working to raise awareness about the Vietnam war era bombing of Laos. Published: 2 Sep 2010. Laos and the legacy of Vietnam.

In Another Quiet American, Brett Dakin takes you through the corridors of power and into the living. CommunitySee all. 289 people like this. 293 people follow this. AboutSee All. Contact Brett Dakin on Messenger.

At the end of the long dramatization of a mythic struggle from days of French colonization, when the lights went up and he was clapping vigorously, the Communist Party members who had surrounded him had slipped out; for them, the play was simply an irrelevant obligation. When Dakin first went to Laos, he hoped to understand the drama of life under a Communist, one-party government. As it turned out, what he witnessed wasn’t a sweeping spectacle of bold revolutionary fervor but smaller stories of individuals trying to make a go of it in a developing country with limited freedoms, and no clearly preferable alternative in sight. His book, published this spring, tells some of these stories.

Brett Dakin, the author of Another Quiet American: Stories of Life in Laos, has served as chair of Legacies of War, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising awareness about the Vietnam War–era bombing of Laos, and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. From Spying to Killing. How America’s secret war in Laos transformed the CIA. Successes of Philanthropy. The investments and innovations that are making a real-world impact, as told by the foundations and philanthropists themselves. A sponsored project by the Washington Monthly.

Brett Dakin spent two years working in Laos and returned to the States a changed man. In Another Quiet American, he takes you through the corridors of power and the living rooms of the poor in Laos.

You'll meet his boss, a wealthy general whose power and reputation scares his countrymen; a prince with connections to the French colonial past; an American pilot who left home for Indochina during the war and never returned; and, rich Lao twenty-somethings who have all the money they could want, but no happiness.

Dakin provides a sympathetic yet irreverent glimpse into life in one of the world's few remaining communist nations, questioning the US's influence on the country and embarking on the soul-searching identity quest of an American abroad.

Reviews: 7
Delari
This book is a pretty good read and shares the author's experiences about his time in Laos. His descriptions concerning the life and culture of Laos in modern times are refreshing. The communist society has many shortcomings and the author shares them while taking them in stride with daily life in Laos. Most of his experiences was within one city (Vientiene)but it is well written and from a fair perspective. Definitely worth reading if you either want to visit Laos or perhaps served there prior to 1975. The comparison is entertaining. The author seems to take the government intrusions without much problem. Perhaps because he knew he could return to the USA after his employment was done. The author is highly respective of the Lao people and that shows in his writing.
DART-SKRIMER
Brett Dakin's book is to Vientiane, Laos what Peter Hessler's book "Rivertown" was to Fuling, China. In my opinion, they are both classics. Another Quiet American is a wonderful read that I didn't want to end. Dakin's story telling, observations and wit made this a most enjoyable read. My only criticism is that Dakin hasn't written another book.
Skiletus
The story is about the authors first job after graduation working for the Laos tourism bureau so the story is told from that perspective. Good, updated prolouge and the rest of the story focuses on individual author encounters and experiences. Focuses heavily on Vientiane and would have liked some more info on Luang Prabang, Plain of Jars, etc. If the author traveled to these areas during his employment it would have been nice to know about these areas. The Kindle version is kind of butchered - no table of contents linkage and font sometimes different sizes.
Legionstatic
I was lucky enough to read this book when I visited Laos. It was a fascinating read. The author, there as a student volunteer, interacted with others at all different levels of life, from his dirt poor neighbours, to the richest man in the country, to the expats and he has something insightful to say about every level. It was slightly sad to read about the foreign aid "industry" and the long history of Laotian dependence on outsiders. I highly recommend reading if you're going to be in the neighbourhood.
Chilele
A very interesting and well thought out book about the author's two years living in Laos. His description of the people he meets are sensitive, and the characters come across as being full of life. A sad book in a way as the story of Laos, as it unfolds, is sad.
Mightsinger
Mr. Dakin vividly evokes the life in Laos ( a little known country ) after the Vietnam war .
USA had almost pulverised Laos with its carpet bombing . Yet Laos has survived and is still a pretty
South Asian country . It's natural beauty unsullied unlike Thailand it's neighbour.
Worth perusing to get the flavour of this country. .
Mbon
This is *the* book to read before travel to Laos or for anyone with a love of southeast Asia and a curiosity about where Laos is headed. The description of life in Vientiane as an expat in the late 90s is beautifully scripted and contains insight still relevant to any further study of Laos and its history or simply pre-travel prep. The author's personal accounts capture a rare window of transformation in Laos which leaves the reader wanting to relive his carefree days as a college graduate exploring the world. Anyone who studied or taught English abroad will relate to his excellent descriptions of life as an outsider and the amazing sensation of discovering a love for another culture. Daikin's genuine interest in the welfare of Laos becomes apparent in his updated introduction which focuses on his continued involvement in banning cluster bombs and raising awareness of unexploded ordinance in Laos.
An entirely accurate portrayal of the Falang life in Laos. The joy the people are to live and work with, combined with the craziness of the 'system' of government.

The world has changed a little since then as the world encroaches on the Lao people, but the base of the story still rings true. I guess I can't fault an autobiographical account for being self-centred, but it is relatively shallow in it's account of why things are the way they are, but this matches the Lao way of shrugging and going on with things.

The writing is engaging and the story is worth telling. I recommend it.