» » Lonely Planet Kyoto
Download Lonely Planet Kyoto epub book
ISBN:1740590600
Author: Chris Rowthorn
ISBN13: 978-1740590600
Title: Lonely Planet Kyoto
Format: lit doc lrf txt
ePUB size: 1249 kb
FB2 size: 1887 kb
DJVU size: 1233 kb
Language: English
Category: Asia
Publisher: Lonely Planet Publications; 2nd edition (November 2001)
Pages: 272

Lonely Planet Kyoto by Chris Rowthorn



Lonely Planet fills a niche by being a good source of information you are not likely to find in other guides, like the funky and the inexpensive, but really I wish they would make their guides more user friendly. A few years ago we discovered Lonely Planet travel guides. They have been a staple of every trip ever since. The Kyoto book was no exception. The major highlights of this book include: - Great walking tours - Fun listings of out of the way places - Interesting history and background - Good tips and recommendations for everything from getting around on the subway (complete with a handy map), to reliable restaurant recommendations.

Lonely Planet City Guides).

Chris Rowthorn is a long-time Kyoto resident, author of Lonely Planet Kyoto and owns ChrisRowthornTours. com is his online guide to Kyoto. Chris Rowthorn was born in Oxford, England, in 1966. He was raised in the United States, where he attended Vassar College, graduating with the class of 1989. After the mandatory stint as an English teacher, Chris started writing for the Japan Times in 1995. In 1996, Chris was recruited by Lonely Planet Publications to work on their guidebooks to Japan. Since then, Chris has written over 25 books for Lonely Planet Publications

Lonely Planet City Guide. The only full-length guide to Kyoto features an expanded Food & Drink chapter that makes translating menus in traditional, less-visited restaurants effortless. Widespread use of Japanese script aids navigation.

Private walking tours of Japan by Lonely Planet author Chris Rowthorn. Trip planning and consultation. Kyoto, Tokyo, Nara, Hiroshima and more. During this time, I’ve also written 19 guidebooks for Lonely Planet about Kyoto and the rest of Japan. I offer you private walking tours of Kyoto, Tokyo, Nara, Hiroshima and Kanazawa. My private walking tours of Kyoto, Tokyo, Nara, Hiroshima and Kanazawa combine a perfect selection of important tourist sites and off-the-beaten path gems.

Yes, I like Lonely Planet guidebooks. And yes, you know exactly why I bought this book. Anyway, we used it thoroughly when we went to Kyoto in August, and we plan on going back once or twice in the next few months, so I feel I got my money's worth. Heck, even if I had never gone to Kyoto, it was worth every penny - it's interesting, informative, and has pretty pictures  . see all 2 descriptions).

Nobody knows Japan like Lonely Planet. Lonely Planet guides are written by experts who get to the heart of every. It may takes up to 1-5 minutes before you received it.

Lonely Planet Kyoto is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Get a panoramic view of Kyoto at Ginkaku-ji, catch a glimpse of geishas in the Gion district, or see Arashiyama's infinite stalks of bamboo; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Kyoto and begin your journey now! Inside Lonely Planet Kyoto Travel Guide: Full-colour maps and images throughout. Highlightsand itineraries help you tailor your trip to your personal needs and interests.

Restaurant listings to impress any Japanese, with enough variety to impress any budget. Here in Japan's cultural capital there are imperial palaces, gardens, shrines and temples and includes 17 World Heritage sites. Colour sections reveal Japanese art, food, religion and teahouses with a hiker's paradise in the mountains beyond Kyoto.
Reviews: 7
Dyni
Lonely Planet fills a niche by being a good source of information you are not likely to find in other guides, like the funky and the inexpensive, but really I wish they would make their guides more user friendly.
For one the maps are extremely frustrating to use. The information on them is numbered, and the keys are either on the page before or the page after the map, so you constantly find yourself looking at the wrong key. The info would fit on the maps themselves, but they chose to use keys without taking full advantage of them by not including the page number of each item's description. Also each map points in a different direction and is a different scale from the others, very confusing.
I also found the index to be lacking some very obvious entries, I don't remember specific examples but I do remember being puzzled by the index on several occasions. By the end of my trip I had corrected many of these problems by penciling them in, I suggest you do this on the airplane so you will spend less time on the street scratching your head.
This guide also has the nasty habit of inserting chapters in the middle of chapters. Sometimes you don't realise there is more information on subject you are reading, you are expected to look past the following chapter.
I found the information in the Kyoto book to be somewhat more up to date than the Lonely Planet guides I have used for other cities. I have learned not to rely too heavily on their specific recommendations, but they usually put me into the right neighborhood for what I am looking for.
Over the years I have been a repeat customer of these guides, although grudgingly. I find them to be a good source of getting the feel of a place before I go somewhere. Lonely Planet is going to lose my business real soon if they don't redesign their guides and become more diligent about updating their material.
Kifer
Basic guide.
SoSok
A few years ago we discovered Lonely Planet travel guides. They have been a staple of every trip ever since. The Kyoto book was no exception.
The major highlights of this book include:
- Great walking tours
- Fun listings of out of the way places
- Interesting history and background
- Good tips and recommendations for everything from getting around on the subway (complete with a handy map), to reliable restaurant recommendations.
- Restaurant & place names written in Japanese in the book. Even if you don't read Japanese, this was very handy for doing symbol comparison to make sure you were in the right place.
Lonely Planet guides are really excellent for helping you see the sights that not everyone else is seeing, and to help you get more out of the culture you are visiting. The authors have a good sense of humor and seem to aim towards a slightly more liberal and adventurous audience.
On their own, I found both the guide and the maps very helpful (although I do agree with the other reviewers that the varied orientation and scaling of the maps could occasionally be disorienting). However, when attempting to cross reference these I often got frustrated. Many of the references to maps in the guide were just wrong (wrong map listed), and many things just weren't on the maps. Similarly, many things on the maps were difficult or impossible to locate in the guide. Example: "We need to find a restaurant near were we are right now. Oh look, here's one a block away. I wonder what type of food they have?....<begin leafing through the guide to find the restaurant listed>... Hmmm...I can't find it...." I know Lonely Planet knows how to do this effectively (see the Condensed guide to Tokyo as an example), it was just frustrating that they did not apply that knowledge to this book.
Nicanagy
As the title indicated, this book is reasonably priced and practical. It does a very good job in introducing the history of Kyoto and the local custom. This is not only useful for traveling but also for gaining a better understanding of an interesting and graceful culture. The book also covers widely all of the points of interest, which includes a good selection of hotels and restaurants. One weakness of the book is the organization. The book separates places of interest and maps into two different section and this makes it difficult to cross reference. You have to make your own plans in connecting all the interesting places into one walk. It would be better if the book can organize a few walking tours that allow us to visit all the highlights.
Snowseeker
No guide is perfect, but some are better than others. In the case of Lonely Planet, some are great, others leave a bit to be desired. For whatever reason, the Kyoto guide is missing some important pieces of information that I would have wanted to see. For example, the best vegetarian restaurant in the city, and one of the few places a veggie can eat some authentic Japanese "meat" dishes (made with fake meat) is the Peace Cafe -- which is not listed in Lonely Planet though it's been around for a few years. Another example: The "japanese-only guides" at the Shigakuin Imperial Residence still holds true.... except they have a full audio guide now, recorded in English, with lots of information at most stops made by the Japanese tour.