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ISBN:0547014856
Author: Gerald Morris
ISBN13: 978-0547014852
Title: The Lioness and Her Knight (The Squire's Tales)
Format: lit docx mobi txt
ePUB size: 1537 kb
FB2 size: 1615 kb
DJVU size: 1264 kb
Language: English
Category: Science Fiction and Fantasy
Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (October 6, 2008)
Pages: 352

The Lioness and Her Knight (The Squire's Tales) by Gerald Morris



The Lioness and Her Knigh. has been added to your Cart. Book 7 of 10 in the Squire's Tales Series. Only 16 left in stock (more on the way).

This book is actually the sequel to 'The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf', my favourite book in 'The Squire's Tales' series. It follows the adventures of Gaheris and Lynet's daughter, Luneta, as she leaves home for the first time and sets out into the big wide world. This book is in many ways very similar to its predecessor, most importantly in the quality and humourousness of its writing. Once again, this author proves his merit and reconfirms my view that he is one of the finest, most intelligent and most consistent authors around at the moment. Good stuff, as usual. Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 12 years ago. The Lioness and Her Knight is a great addition to The Squire's Tales series. The reader is reunited with characters that we love to love from earlier novels, and we are introduced to new characters that are stubborn, skilled, funny, silly, shallow, magical, and strong.

Gerald Morris, unlike many authors, seems to have never encountered a writing slump in his series and he hasn’t struck out yet. I’ve loved every book in the series for its own unique qualities, something that is incredibly rare. The Lioness and Her Knight presents a very cynical view of people like The Ballad of Sir Dinadan does, but it’s also full of love and hope.

About book: Luneta is tired of living in dull Orkney with her mother and father (who happens to be the most boring knight of King Arthur’s Round Table). She prides herself on always getting what she wants, so when the opportunity presents itself, she jumps at the chance to stay at a family friend’s castle near Camelot. Her handsome cousin, Sir Ywain -a young knight seeking adventure-arrives just in time to escort her to King Arthur’s court. Along the way they pick up a knight-turned-fool named Rhience, whose wit and audacity set many a puffed-up personality in its place. and out of distress, The Lioness and Her Knight proves itself as witty and adventuresome as the rest of Gerald Morris’s tales from King Arthur’s court.

The Lioness & Her Knight. Houghton Mifflin Company. With gratitude to Rebecca, And also to the wonderful Georgette Heyer. The thought of being escorted by her parents "with all due decorum" seemed very tame and stifling, but she felt that she could put up with anything that would get her away from Orkney Hall. She fell into deep thought, imagining life at a real castle, and ceased listening to her parents' conversation, with the result that she didn't notice when their voices stopped, and barely had time to leap up from the fireplace to a chair when her father rapped twice on the door and entered. Oh, hello, Father," Luneta said, smiling innocently. The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf. The Lioness and Her Knight. The Adventures of Sir Lancelot the Great.

Morris, Gerald, 1963-. Varying Form of Title: Lioness and her knight. Publication, Distribution, et. Boston "The squire's tales" Jacket. Summary, et. Headstrong sixteen-year-old Lady Luneta and her distant cousin, Sir Ywain, travel to Camelot and beyond finding more adventure than they hoped for until, with the help of a fool, Luneta discovers what she really wants from life. Geographic Name: Great Britain History To 1066 Juvenile fiction.

The Madness of Ywain Huddled in her long winter robe, her fingers numb, Luneta rode gratefully up to the gaily colored encampment around the Oxford tournament fields ter ring of tents, she found herself at once in a busy crowd of brightly dressed courtiers and ladies. Normally she would have been enthralled by the sumptuous furs and fashions that surrounded her, but this day she hardly noticed. Excuse me," she said to a passing lady-in-waiting, "is the tournament over yet?". Oh, no," the lady replied.

by The Ponderer 16 Jul 2018, 12:05. by aztevike 16 Jul 2018, 01:47. Bookshelf of a Heart.

ch ht -The-(Gerald-Morris)- Other. eu Lioness and Her Knight, The (Gerald Morris) - doc. 6 hours. Be careful of what you download or face the consequences. Could not find any peer statistics from any torrent tracker. This does not mean the torrent is dead. You cannot download any of those files from here. Hindi movies 2019 latest 1s, VENOM 0s, dallas and robo 2s, captain marvel 2s, the flash 1s, English movies 2019 2s, title: Green Day American Idiot 2s, title: strange affair 1996 1s, title:hannah 1s, AssholeFever 1s.

Gerald Morris is an American author. Morris is known for his series of stories for preteen and teen readers based in the Middle Ages during the time of King Arthur. Collectively called The Squire's Tales, the series includes The Squire's Tale, The Squire, His Knight, and His Lady, The Savage Damsel and The Dwarf, Parsifal's Page, The Ballad of Sir Dinadan, The Princess, the Crone, and the Dung Cart Knight, The Lioness and Her Knight, The Quest of the Fair Unknown, The Squire's Quest, and The Legend of the. King.

Luneta is tired of living in dull Orkney with her mother and father (who happens to be the most boring knight of King Arthur’s Round Table). She prides herself on always getting what she wants, so when the opportunity presents itself, she jumps at the chance to stay at a family friend’s castle near Camelot. Her handsome cousin, Sir Ywain—a young knight seeking adventure—arrives just in time to escort her to King Arthur’s court.

Along the way they pick up a knight-turned-fool named Rhience, whose wit and audacity set many a puffed-up personality in its place. Before arriving at Lady Laudine’s castle, the trio stops at Camelot, where they hear the story of the Storm Stone, a magical object deep in the forest that soon sweeps everyone into a web of love, betrayal, and more than a bit of magic.

Filled with broken promises, powerful enchantresses, unconventional sword fights, fierce and friendly lionesses, mysterious knights, and damsels in and out of distress, The Lioness and Her Knight proves itself as witty and adventuresome as the rest of Gerald Morris’s tales from King Arthur’s court.

Reviews: 7
Buridora
This is literally the most amazing book I've ever read. The characters are funny, relatable and go through incredible growth. I have read it several times and it's just as incredible every time I read it (if not more). This is a must read for anyone who loves books.
KiddenDan
I have greatly enjoyed all of the books in Gerald Morris's Squire's Tales, and this one reconnects use with some of the character from earlier books, while giving us new characters to enjoy. One of the surrounding themes in this story is how things can spiral out of control when we "help" people through meddling.
Fearlesssinger
I cried when this series ended. It is a fast-paced, witty, intelligent, and fun new take on King Arthur and his round table, the knights, Merlin, and the enchanting world of faeries. Worth a read. Everyone in my family loves these books and recommends them as often as possible.
Ral
This is a great series of books that girls especially enjoy. After a quick explore at the library, you will want to own your own copies.
Bundis
Knights and castles. Ladies in waiting. Arthur, Guinevere, and Lancelot. The stories of romance and chivalry. I always hated them. I thought Guinevere was a spoiled shameless woman, Lancelot was a peacock masquerading as a man, and Arthur wasn’t worthy of his title of King.

Jousting didn’t thrill my soul. I’d rather watch baseball. (Hint: I despise it). Honestly, I’m supposed to take two men in metal riding at each other with sticks seriously? At least the Scots threw poles with brute strength and tossed rocks with abandon! At least they danced! Honestly, Sir Modred seemed to have more gumption than the rest of the knights put together.

So how did I become a fan of a series of books like The Squire’s Tales? I happened to read a blurb about one (the eighth in the series I think) and it sounded funny. I was having a bad day and a funny book sounded delightful. I bought it. As you can see, this alone should have shown my mental state. I’m having bad day today, so I’ll buy a book today, and read it on a day when I’m probably having a marvelous day. After all, bad days don’t happen that often!

But when it arrived, the house was empty and I chose to ignore housework for books. I have singular tastes, but hey. Honestly, I laughed through the entire book. I rolled, I roared, I got more raised eyebrows from my kids than I can count. I read sections to my husband who dutifully smiled and snickered as the occasion warranted. He is so obliging.

I decided that it was worth a shot. Maybe, just maybe, the first book would be at least semi-enjoyable. It was. I read the second book. Loved it. I passed them on to friends. I kept buying. I’ve now read them all and am tapping toes, fingers, and nose hairs for the next book. Haven’t I bought enough of them to hold weight with you? I personally have purchased four complete sets!

I’ve never been a fan of the Arthurian Legends. These books do what someone should have done years ago. They take all of the stories, from all of the sources and languages, and pull the best from them into one great story.

A few of my favorite things in these books:

Lancelot: He’s shown for the philandering creep that he is without defiling my mind to do it. He also is later shown as a repentant and worthy man. What a concept. Repentance. What will they think of next?

Guinevere: She’s shown as the silly self-absorbed woman that she was. She isn’t romanticized and idolized as the epitome of femininity. It’s about time.

Arthur: He’s shown as a hurting husband. His wife’s mental infidelity is shown as the home-wrecking thing that it is. He’s shown as a loving and forgiving man but one who is strong and unyielding, too.

Tristan and Isolde: A totally different take than the movie. I loved it.

Get the books. Buy them today. Do not go past go, do not hesitate. But if you can't buy them, go to the library, eBay, whatever it takes but get the books. You won’t regret it and you just might learn to enjoy Arthur. Now that’s amazing!

Ok, if I haven’t convinced you yet… I could mention that one of my daughters had a less than thrilled attitude about having to read the first book. While she knew better than to truly complain, she was not excited about it in the least. It took a reminder that there was a deadline. The shelf of eight more books wasn’t very encouraging either. However, I am pleased to say that she started on the second book without a word of encouragement and talks about Terrance as though he was a dear friend. They’re THAT good.

Caveat: These books DO have the “other world” stories of Morgan le Fey and similar “magical” things that are in the original legends. If these things violate your conscience, I am afraid I’ve just wasted your reading time and for that, I apologize.
net rider
Reader thoughts:
This is one of my favorites of the Squire's Tales series. It has just as much humor and adventure as the others (less morbid), but it also has more wit (from a substitute fool) and more character (from the lady compared to a lioness). There's also more magic and more dueling (with rubber swords) and more betrayal and backstabbing (between two sisters).

This book surprises me every time I read it. I laugh in delight and imagine that I am as interesting to listen to as Rhys is. When the reader first meets him, he is juggling one ball in one hand, "going back to the basics" he says. "What is progress for a juggler, 4 balls? 8? I'm taking juggling to it's barest form." And he proceeds to insult the cowardly knight who is anything but amused.

Thankfully, our heroine IS amused, and they join forces against evil (and general pigheadedness).

Writer thoughts:
The end of the book was almost risky. The one sister's decision made the climax almost pointless. However, it works perfectly. As one of the characters points out, having your inheritance stolen could embitter you for life. Giving it away could make you happy for life, even though it seems to be the same result on the outside.
Snowskin
The overall plot is the romance between this woman and Ywain, but it gets more complicated. For one thing, Luneta is the main character, and she's going around all over the place. Characters are coming in and out, in and out. There are mini-stories, of how this evil man was killed and that evil man banished. It's one mixing pot of what could be two or three different stories.

The good thing is that the characters are likeable. Luneta is beautiful, smart, and plucky. Rhience is witty and amusing. There is a hermit whose entertaining and gives a whole new meaning to 'holy'. The romance is pretty well developed. The smart, funny dialogue really adds spice and flavour. Yep, the dialogue definitely makes the book more 'good' than 'bad'.
This book is actually the sequel to 'The Savage Damsel and the Dwarf', my favourite book in 'The Squire's Tales' series. It follows the adventures of Gaheris and Lynet's daughter, Luneta, as she leaves home for the first time and sets out into the big wide world.

This book is in many ways very similar to its predecessor, most importantly in the quality and humourousness of its writing. Once again, this author proves his merit and reconfirms my view that he is one of the finest, most intelligent and most consistent authors around at the moment. He'll make you laugh, and while you're doing it, he'll also make you think. His insights are second to none. I cannot recommend this highly enough.