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Download The Shell House epub book
ISBN:0385750110
Author: Linda Newbery
ISBN13: 978-0415226578
Title: The Shell House
Format: mbr lrf doc mobi
ePUB size: 1782 kb
FB2 size: 1515 kb
DJVU size: 1342 kb
Language: English
Category: Literature and Fiction
Publisher: David Fickling Books; 1st American edition (August 13, 2002)
Pages: 352

The Shell House by Linda Newbery



Lori said: This book's writing style is very florid and sentimental. The Shell House is a dual narrative, going back and forth in time the roughly present day and First World War, following the lives of Greg and Edmund. Greg is a sixth former with an interest in photography who finds a new friend in Faith, the daughter of a Friend of Graveney Hall who are doing the home up, and discovers he's seeing his friend Jordan in a new light.

Books Shell House, Linda Newbery. 1 Almost by Stigmatized The "Morning After" scene from Jordan's point of view. K, English, words: 635, 6/28/2015. 4 It's just the past you're leaving by Stigmatized Sometimes a shock is needed to make you realise. 7 Keeping the Bargain by 5redroses Set right after The Shell House by Linda Newberry. I only recommend reading this if you've read the book. A short one shot in which Greg keeps his bargain with God. K+, English, Hurt/Comfort & Romance, words: 533, favs: 1, 7/22/2009.

The Shell House (2004). About book: Greg’s casual interest in the history of a ruined mansion becomes more personal as he slowly discovers the tragic events that overwhelmed its last inhabitants. Set against a background of the modern day and the First World War, Greg’s contemporary beliefs become intertwined with those of Edmund, a foot soldier whose confusion about his sexuality and identity mirrors Greg’s own feelings of insecurity. This is a complex and thought-provoking book, written with elegance and subtlety. It will change the way you think.

The Shell House is a beautifully written and sensitive portrayal of love, sexuality and spirituality over two generations. Greg's casual interest in the history of a ruined mansion becomes more personal as he slowly discovers the tragic events that overwhelmed its last inhabitants. Set against a background of the modern day and the First World War, Greg's contemporary beliefs become intertwined with those of Edmund, a foot soldier whose confusion about his sexuality and identity mirrors Greg's own feelings of insecurity.

Jan Mark untangles the strands of history and sexuality woven together by Linda Newbery in The Shell House. Graveney Hall is literally a shell, burned out and abandoned for decades, but the extensive grounds are being restored by a group of enthusiasts. Among them is Greg, a young photographer looking for a subject. Greg's life is taking off in all directions.

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My second try with Linda Newbery. I really want to love her! The covers of her book are always so appealing! This one had bits that were set in Chelmsford, and I lived in Essex for nine months! But still, the only strong reaction I had to her books – like last time – was, Jesus God, I’m so glad I’m not raising children in England. The Shell House is about a boy who is struggling with his sexuality, and a girl who is struggling with her faith, and a back-in-the-day World War I guy who’s struggling with both. It had bits that were good, but there were also bits that were just blah. Faith (the girl who’s um, struggling with her – I don’t know why I bothered with this sentence) isn’t terribly likeable, ever, and the two plots don’t come together very neatly either.

If you can get past the first 50 pages of this book, you will find that it starts to grow on you. I put the book away, came back after a week, plowed on-and then I finished the last 3/4 of it in a flurry, needing to know what happened next. As you read, the characters become more alive and rounded, and their interests and experiences more developed, nuanced, and believable. The novel also has an ending that keeps you kind of guessing as to what eventually Greg tells himself about his own sexual identity.

At quarter past two on a hot summer afternoon, Anna's beautiful, headstrong older sister Rose disappears. Gradually, her mother pushed Sean away, before resigning from her job and selling the house, forcing Sean to find somewhere else to live. Although Charlie believes her mother is making a terrible mistake, she can only offer support - but who will support Charlie, with Sean cut out of their lives? She's certain that the move to a ramshackle cottage, miles from anywhere, can only make things worse.

Greg’s casual interest in the history of a ruined mansion becomes more personal as he slowly discovers the tragic events that overwhelmed its last inhabitants. Set against a background of the modern day and the First World War, Greg’s contemporary beliefs become intertwined with those of Edmund, a foot soldier whose confusion about his sexuality and identity mirrors Greg’s own feelings of insecurity.This is a complex and thought-provoking book, written with elegance and subtlety. It will change the way you think.
Reviews: 5
felt boot
Linda Newbery doesn't seem to be well known in the US ---she's written a great many books, but precious few of them appear to have been reviewed on the American Amazon site. It's a pity, because this is the second book I've read written by this author, and both have been excellent.

This book really took me back a few years, to that half-forgotten period of my late teens. Do any of you remember hanging out with your friends and chatting up a storm back when everything was so new, and your whole life just waiting to be explored? I haven't thought about those talks for a while, but all sorts of topics would come up in these earnest conversations---the nature of good and evil, what life is all about in the grand scheme of things, what sort of religious beliefs one does (or doesn't) hold, and why... And that's just how the friends in this book talk---man, makes me a bit nostalgic for my youth and a time before I became a bit jaded....

There really haven't been a huge number of books in my daily reading these past few years, that bring thoughts (and memories) like this to mind and put me in a contemplative mood. And in this respect, I think this novel put me very much in mind of the work of Madeleine L'Engle, an author who I've long admired---so for me that is high praise.

Both the flashback and the current-day story-lines are quite interesting, but the majority of the novel deals with the present day---the text isn't evenly divided into past/present sections. There are three major plot-lines in the book, and none of them is wrapped up in a neat little bow, though I will say that the ending in general has a hopeful tone. I really liked this book, and gladly recommend it.

(Not to mention, the entire sub-plot about the volunteers working on the remnants of the house and gardens of this once-stately manor seems tailor-made for me---just the sort of thing guaranteed to grab my interest!)

Interesting... the flower on the cover is a calendula, which symbolises grief, despair, and sorrow---quite appropriate for some of the WWI portions of the novel...
Villo
This captivatingly-poignant, love story-mystery vibrantly depicts the struggles of Greg, Faith, and Jordan as the lives of these young adults of the twenty-first century and those of the twentieth century Edmund intertwine in the universal quest for identity. As Greg, Jordan, and Faith explore their sexual, spiritual, and moral identities in the year 2002, their lives begin to reflect the issues surrounding the mystery of an intriguing antique mansion, left as a mere shell by a fire that ravaged it during World War I, and of Edmund, the wealthy young man who once lived in the magnificent home. In spite of his wealth and apparent ease of lifestyle, Edmund encountered many of the same issues that Greg and his friends do in their middle class lives in 2002.

Vivid, flowing descriptions paint a memorable, picturesque integral setting in which the believable, fully-developed characters struggle to mature. Considering the controversial topics conveyed, this novel is remarkably free from didacticism, thus lending itself conducive to the reader to, in turn, strive to be true to his own reality. The unusually subtle denouement as well as the neutral tone of the author, merely reinforces this. The characters' antagonists are their own preconceived expectations of what life should be. Symbolism and metaphors are skillful embellishments that contribute to deeper meaning and impact of the theme of self-discovery. The story is very effectively written in first person narration, primarily by Greg and intermittently by Edmund. Each young man's chapter is introduced by his own means of self expression. A mental photograph, reflecting Greg's love of photography, begins each chapter narrated by Greg, and Edmund's chapters are initiated by his poems. Although this is a British novel and the slang is problematic for American youth, this will prove to be no hindrance to its appeal. Once the young reader deciphers the unfamiliar words, the language used may even become part of its appeal.