Download Rough Ride epub book
ISBN:0091749263
Author: Paul Kimmage
ISBN13: 978-0091749262
Title: Rough Ride
Format: lrf mbr txt azw
ePUB size: 1892 kb
FB2 size: 1440 kb
DJVU size: 1477 kb
Language: English
Category: Individual Sports
Publisher: Stanley Paul; New Ed edition (1991)
Pages: 208

Rough Ride by Paul Kimmage



Rough Ride is a William Hill Sports Book of the Year, written by Irish journalist Paul Kimmage in 1990. It is an autobiography that charts the author's upbringing in Dublin and his obsession with cycling, which started with his father being a top-level Irish amateur. Paul Kimmage was Irish junior champion before riding for an amateur squad in Paris and becoming a professional with a French team, RMO, in 1986. He rode the Tour de France in 1986, 1987 and 1989.

Paul Kimmage's boyhood dreams were of cycling glory: wearing First published in 1990, Rough Ride is one of the greatest books ever written about the life of a professional athlete. Paul Kimmage left the sport to write this book. An eye-opening expose and a heartbreaking lament, it is a book that anyone interested in any sport should read.

In tracing his mixed fortunes, Kimmage describes not only the grueling pressures of the sport but also the seamier side: the widespread use of drugs to enhance performance. A Rough Ride breaks the law of silence to expose a world where the supposed glamour has worn very thin.

First published in 1990, Rough Ride is one of the greatest books ever written about the life of a professional athlete. Paul Kimmage's boyhood dreams were of cycling glory: wearing the yellow jersey, cycling the Tour de France, becoming a national hero. He knew it wouldn't come easy, but he was prepared to put in the graft: he spent his teenage years cycling an average of 400 miles per week. Winner of the William Hill Sports Book of the Year Award.

Paul Kimmage's boyhood dreams were of cycling glory: wearing the yellow jersey, cycling the Tour de France, becoming a national hero. He knew it wouldn't come easy, but he was prepared to put in the graft. The dedication paid off – he finished sixth in the World Championships as an amateur and in 1986, he turned professional. Kimmage ultimately left the sport to write this book – profoundly honest and ground-breaking, Rough Ride broke the silence surrounding the issue of drugs in sport, and documents one man’s love for, and struggle with, the complex world of professional cycling. A must read for any cyclist’ Cyclist WINNER OF WILLIAM HILL SPORTS BOOK OF THE YEAR.

Paul Kimmage’s diary and description of the grimmer, prosaic, desperate, and downright sleazy aspects of professional cycling ought to have received a great deal of press, but there is a strong sense that the cycling world isn’t interested in vindicating one of it’s own. If you’re looking for the flashier, reality-television seamy underbelly of professional cycling and the organized doping of Lance Armstrong, et alia. This book is for those who love cycling, but are grown up enough to realize why professional cycling can and should never be uncritically idealized. Rough Ride is also a remarkably genuine warning for those parents whose children are competing at an elite level in any sport.

Paul Kimmage is best known as the former professional cyclist who wrote a book, Rough Ride, about his experiences with widespread doping in pro cycling and the Tour de France, a race he first rode in his rookie year of 1986. Disillusioned with the sport, Kimmage retired from racing after three seasons and became a full-time journalist. In 2009, when Lance Armstrong returned to cycling, at the opening press conference of the Tour of California he and Kimmage had a heated exchange about doping.

Kimmage ultimately left the sport to write this book - profoundly honest and ground-breaking, Rough Ride broke the silence surrounding the issue of drugs in sport, and documents one man's love for, and struggle with, the complex world of professional cycling. must read for any cyclist' Cyclist WINNER OF WILLIAM HILL SPORTS BOOK OF THE YEAR show more. Format Paperback 336 pages.

Reviews: 7
MARK BEN FORD
There are others more informed in cycling who can give a more detailed review than I. I gave up on cycling after a few rides, it was not the sport for me, but I follow pro racing on television and in magazines. It seems so glamorous. But I wanted to know what it's really like. This book gives you so much insight, if you follow pro cycling you may never see it quite the same way again. The glamour is reserved for a very few. For guys like Paul, second rate riders (if you can call a pro rider second rate!), the cycling life has just a quickly passing hint glamour and brief moments of joy but mostly it's a very, very tough slog, not only on the courses themselves but dealing with the other riders.

Paul shows how tightly knit the community of riders is and what he had to put up with as someone who spoke up against doping. I think that culture may have changed now, as riders in 2013 have turned viciously against dopers in an effort to clean up the sport and their own reputations - but Paul was a pioneer in that regard. He writes about the bitter rejection he received and the abusive letters that came his way from members of the cycling establishment and then the media establishment, once he became a journalist and wrote about cycling.

Even though my knowledge of pro cycling is not what I would call great, I enjoyed this book immensely for its candour and for the revelations about a life lived on two wheels. For sure it's easier today for riders (Paul had to wash his own kit - unthinkable today), but the grim aspects of life as a domestique survive to this day I'm sure. The book is well written and compelling, and I found it hard to put down.
Vonalij
Just finished it. It really draws a straight line connexion between the doping practices of the 1980's and the later 'version on steroids' doping of the late 90's and 2000's. They start the new pros off with vitamin injections... completely legal, but it gets them used to injecting themselves with 'stuff' that helps them recover and race faster... then come the amphetamines, steroids, etc. and later HGH, EPO, etc. There really is a whole 'grooming' procedure that these guys are put through to get them to the point where they will accept 'enhancements.' It may sound sad to say, but this is the book that made me realize I never loved the sport of professional cycling... I loved the *idea* of the sport of professional cycling. It's all smoke and mirrors for money's sake and the way this sport chews up new pro athletes and spits out old pro athletes is really quite deplorable. I'm very glad I read Kimmage's account and only wished people had paid attention to the warning signs back then.
Abuseyourdna
This book is written by an idealistic Irish national champion who thought to make a career of himself as a professional cyclist. What he found out is that system as it exists uses up its riders like disposable cameras. He had ambitions of glory or at least success, only to find that his talent is common in the pro ranks. What he describes is what it takes to exist as a professional cyclist - the wear and tear on the body and the pounding on the psyche. Hired as a domestique, his job is to support the big guns, the stars. Yet he is compensated on his own personal racing results, which are earned only when he is released from his supporting duties. For lesser riders like him, doping is the logical and even professional way of being able to perform. His transgressions are minor - caffeine suppositories, and trial use of speed, which he discards as just too *visible*. Eventually he drops out of cycling as he transitions into another line of work, sports reporting. His message is that it is the system that is broken - open knowledge of which events are not dope-controlled, the compensation system that expects riders to sacrifice their own results to those of the team, yet get paid on the basis of their criterium results. Most of all it is the code of silence that keeps all the riders mum and reinforces the idea that there is no alternative.
He speaks from the point of view of the average rider. While he is tight with the Irish greats of his day (Tour de France winner Stephen Roche and TdF points winner Sean Kelly), he can't and doesn't speak of them beyond his personal experiences from sharing hotel rooms, training rides and personal relationships. If you are looking for a tell-all book about the greats of the Tour de France, you will not find it here. This is his story, no one else's. It's not a comprehensive book about sports doping or even doping in the professional peleton. What made his story notorious in its time was the fact that he dared to speak of it at all. His transgressions were minor but his story ostracized him from his cycling generation for years.

He updated the booking in 2005, when he ventured back into that world, albeit as a journalist rather than a rider. Things had changed yet stayed the same. His point of view is tainted now, in that he sees doping everywhere, just in a more sophisticated form than in his day.

This book is interesting not so much for the details but for the pressures on the riders to perform and to do anything/everything that the others must do. You and I have long commutes and sedentary lives that are required by our jobs; they have different job constraints that are just as binding, only theirs will kill them sooner. What a life! Thanks, Paul, for letting us see this life from your point of view.
Quendant
Exceptional book detailing life as a struggling cyclist. Starting with a successful local amateur career he moves to France to ride with a top ranked amateur French team before becoming a low level pro. The most FASCINATING part is his description of riding the tour: but more specifically, the process of withdrawing his second year. He's riding well and then hits the wall, starts the internal discussion that he can slow down even when teammates beg him to renter the peloton. Then, the realization of shame and tears as he regrets withdrawing. It's quite fascinating particularly to riders that know the feeling of being dropped in a group ride. Imagine that at the highest level.

There is much more in this book but I found the book to lose focus after the original story with chapters of a lost cycling friend and also the death of another. But in closing he revisits the tour where he has been ostracized for writing of the doping while he was on tour. Actually, that's almost comical because all they used was amphetamines. The tour he revisits is won by Floyd Landis, disavowed French Open winner, also primarily responsible for Lance Armstrong's fall from grace. How is that for poetry?

I strongly recommend this book even though dated, for all cyclists or those with interest in cycling. Slow in parts but the primary story survives in tact and is very compelling.