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ISBN:1931382123
Author: John Wilcockson,Owen Mulholland
ISBN13: 978-1931382120
Title: Uphill Battle: Cycling's Great Climbers
Format: azw txt lrf txt
ePUB size: 1328 kb
FB2 size: 1213 kb
DJVU size: 1322 kb
Language: English
Category: Individual Sports
Publisher: VeloPress; Complete Numbers Starting with 1, 1st Ed edition (May 2003)
Pages: 256

Uphill Battle: Cycling's Great Climbers by John Wilcockson,Owen Mulholland



An engaging look at the legendary feats of the great uphill cyclists. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Uphill Battle: Cycling's Great Climbers as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Written by America's greatest cycling historian, Owen Mulholland, Uphill Battle gives a synopsis of the careers of 31 great climbers. To the uninitiated cycling can appear to be a boring procession of innumerable rumps rotating over two wheels. Mulholland has the unique ability to bring alive not only the careers of these eagles of the mountains, by why each one was so aclaimed during his moment of glory.

Former Library books. Great condition for a used book! Minimal wear. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Former Library books. John Wilcockson, Owen Mulholland.

This book, rich in anecdote and history, explores in words and pictures the world of uphill cycling. Recreational cyclists can ride the same roads, compare their own efforts with those of masters like Coppi and Merckx and Armstrong, and come away with an understanding of the heroic feats that made these greats so great. Users who liked this book, also liked.

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3 Climbing physics and physiology. 4 Bicycle technology. 5 King of the Mountains in stage races. 6 Examples of climbers. Owen Mulholland, John Wilcockson. Uphill Battle: Cycling's Great Climbers.

Uphill Battle: Cycling's Great Climbers - May 2003 by Owen Mulholland and John Wilcockson. Religious Studies for Common Entrance 13+ Exam Practice Questions - Oct 30, 2015 by Michael Wilcockson and Susan Grenfell. An Imperilled Dream - Jan 2, 2014 by Margaret Wilcockson. Wilcox family history. Oct 14, 2010 by Owen N. 1880- Wilcox. Religious Studies for Common Entrance 13+ Revision Guide - Sep 25, 2015 by Michael Wilcockson. Religious Studies for Common Entrance 13+ Exam Practice Answers - Sep 25,.

Cycling historian Owen Mulholland profiles 40 of cycling's greatest climbers. This collection of superhuman mountain performances recounts the stories of cycling’s legendary climbers and the lesser-known riders who etched their moment of triumph into the sport’s annals. Uphill Battle revels in the themes of the human condition-from heroism, teamwork, superb athleticism, and personal sacrifice, on down the scale to jealousy, deceit, and sabotage. Owen Mulholland gives readers a roadside experience of the most memorable climbs and endears them to the legacy of cycling’s climbers. More than 40 climbers are profiled, spanning a century of the sport.

Cycling historian, Owen Mulholland weaves it all together with the tales of each rider, their admirable feats, and the nostalgia of each item in the collection. Format Hardback 232 pages. Owen is also the author of Uphill Battle: Cycling's Great Climbers. He lives in San Anselmo, California. Cascade Courier, newsletter of the Cascade Bicycle Club Cycling s Golden Age is the Sports Book of the Year ForeWord magazine This book is a wonderful tribute to a glorious time in the sport. All the big names are here along with the ones nobody has heard mentioned in decades. Phil Liggett I had the honor of racing during 12 years of cycling s great history. Now, as a spectator, I am as excited reading about past triumphs as I am about this year s races.

This book, rich in anecdote and history, explores in words and pictures the world of uphill cycling. Recreational cyclists can ride the same roads, compare their own efforts with those of masters like Coppi and Merckx and Armstrong, and come away with an understanding of the heroic feats that made these greats so great. Dozens of photographs add to an engaging look at this amazing sport.
Reviews: 7
Kitaxe
Many don't know that Owen Mulholland was the first American journalist to ever ride in the chase vehicles in the Tour de France. . and Owen is a cyclist who can understand what it takes. . .
AfinaS
Written by America's greatest cycling historian, Owen Mulholland, Uphill Battle gives a synopsis of the careers of 31 great climbers. To the uninitiated cycling can appear to be a boring procession of innumerable rumps rotating over two wheels. Mulholland has the unique ability to bring alive not only the careers of these eagles of the mountains, by why each one was so aclaimed during his moment of glory. Each chapter is short, riveting,and easy to read. Beyond the ecitement of the individual exploits is the relationship of each climber and his conquests to the panorama of a century of cycling history. All of this is done in a prose that is, frankly, unique. Any person with a modicrum of interest in cycling will love Uphill battle.
Ballazan
poorly written and boring
Use_Death
Owen Mulholland is known as a writer of cycling history and "Uphill Battle"is a worthwhile addition to the specialized genre of books for bike nuts. While there has been a recent torrent of books on the Tour de France, this book also describes some interesting and exciting stages of the other great stage races, the Giro d'Italia and the Vuelta in Spain.

The book is arranged in chronological fashion as a series of brief biographies of climbing cyclists. The stories really begin in 1905 when mountains were introduced into the Tour de France for the first time. It is a never-ending amazement to me how incredibly difficult the early Tours were, with terrible roads, fixed gear bicycles and gargantuan stages. For example, the 1926 Tour, Mulholland informs us, was almost twice as long as the current version!

It is true that many of the stories have been repeated for decades-what fan of the Tour does not know of Eugene Christophe and the broken fork, or poor Rene Vietto turning around for his team leader, or Merckx's virtuosity in seemingly everything? But there are a lot of other good stories here about riders who had their moments of glory in the mountains and then, over time, slid out of sight. Some riders were not known for their climbing at all, including Rik van Looy, but still managed to go for the prize when it beckoned.

The chapter on Lance Armstrong is the longest single one in the book and is a good recapitulation of Big Tex's career to his fifth Tour de France victory in 2002. While Mulholland does not fawn over Armstrong, it is clear that Lance Armstrong is a rarity in pro cycling as a rider who is not only superb at time trialling but one of the very best at climbing as well.

The book could have used better editing in avoiding the occasional repetitions. As well, the Modern Era is represented by allrounders, such as Fignon, LeMond, Indurain and Roche instead of the pure climbers one would expect to see. That said, the chapters on the Columbian star Luis Herrera and the Basque Roberto Laiseka are illuminating, and the chapter on Marco Pantani captures the very ambivalent record of this Giro and Tour winner.

The book could have been improved with more on other races with difficult climbs but as it stands it is an entertaining and enjoyable account and worth recommending. There are some very good pictures, including a great one of Anquetil and Poulidor elbowing each other like sprinters as they climb the Puy-de-Dome in 1964. Bikes of steel, men of iron.
Kinashand
Mountains weren't added to the Tour de France until 1905. Tour boss Henri Desgrange added them only because a staffer incessantly hounded him until, finally worn down, Desgrange capitulated. At first, the mountains in the Tour de France were the more modest ascents of the Vosges and Alps. In 1910 the Tour added the giant pyrenean climbs; the Peyresourde, Aspin, Tourmalet and the Aubisque. A year later came the high Alps.

The addition of hard climbing transformed the Tour. The men who have the ability to bound up the mountains (the Italians have a special word for these riders: Scattista) have fascinated cycle race fans since that race in 1905. Sometimes they are specialists who can only climb, but do not have the complete set of cycling skills to win the Tour (Rene Vietto, Jose Manuel Fuente and Andy Hampsten are in this category). Others have so much power, are such magnificent athletes that they can climb with the specialists and also time-trial and ride cobbles with equal ease. This group would include Lance Armstrong, Greg LeMond, Fausto Coppi and Gino Bartali.

Owen Mulholland takes them all on (including episodes from both the Giro d'Italia and the Tour de France) and tells their stories well. What makes this book a pleasure is that Owen writes as if he were talking to you. His enthusiasm comes across every page. He is a man mad about bikes and bike racing and I love everything he has ever written about the sport.

There are 39 chapters, each about a particular climber and each is a gem
-Bill McGann, author of "The Story of the Tour de France: How a Newspaper Promotion Became the Greatest Sporting Event in the World".
Sorryyy
This book reads more like a series of magazine articles than a coherent history.
Mulholland has some grammatical quirks - mostly his pronouns get out of whack - making me read many sentences several times to sort out who he's talking about. He is fixated on Franco and torture in Spain; this gets somewhat boring.
Other quirks that really made me want to put the book down even though I wanted to know the stories were his repeated parenthetical explanations of things like the fact that 'Giro d'Italia' is the Tour of Italy. If he thinks his readership don't already know this, he could explain it once and then leave it alone. Lavishes praise on Armstrong, bags out Pantani, and ignores Virenque.
Some good stories, but I found the grammatical and stylistic problems greatly distracting.