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Download Low Kicks: Aiming Low For Maximum Punishment In Unarmed Combat epub book
ISBN:1581601387
Author: Fred Hutchinson
ISBN13: 978-1581601381
Title: Low Kicks: Aiming Low For Maximum Punishment In Unarmed Combat
Format: mbr mobi lit lrf
ePUB size: 1455 kb
FB2 size: 1660 kb
DJVU size: 1644 kb
Language: English
Category: Individual Sports
Publisher: Paladin Press (May 1, 2001)
Pages: 104

Low Kicks: Aiming Low For Maximum Punishment In Unarmed Combat by Fred Hutchinson



In this book, Fred Hutchinson, author of The Modern Swordsman, offers basic instruction on stance, kick chambering, weight shifting and footwork. He then teaches specific training drills and methods for throwing chambered and unchambered kicks; practicing proper kicking form; training for agility, speed, accuracy and power; maximizing your kicking power through lower-body conditioning; and employing low kicks tactically. Practice them consistently and you will become adept at dealing out destruction with your feet and knees should the need arise.

You are here: Home Products Books Miscellaneous Low Kicks Aiminglow for Maximum Punishment in unarmed combat-100pgs 7 best My flicker images on Pinterest Kittens, Kitty cats and 1930s -It is a hand-to-hand combat system based on practical experience mixed with not only in the Low Kicks: Aiming LowFor Maximum Punishment In Unarmed.

This book is an excellent well thought-out treaties on low line kicks for maximum punishment below the beltline. For being such a short book it is chuck full of superb information with low line kicking techniques compiled and streamlined from various styles (like Savate, et. Fred Hutchinson presents well-grounded practcal self-defense in this fine thin manual. This author has studied and applied various Martial Arts - Western Sword Arts most in particular.

Home All Categories Health & Fitness Safety & First Aid Books Low Kicks: Aiming Low For Maximum Punishment In Unarmed Combat. ISBN13: 9781581601381. Low Kicks : Aiming Low for Maximum Punishment in Unarmed Combat. If you want to acquire the skills needed to defend against larger, stronger adversaries without devoting a lifetime to martial art study, this book offers a viable solution: become an expert low kicker.

In this book, Fred Hutchinson, author of The Modern Swordsman, offers basic instruction on stance, kick chambering, weight shifting and footwork. He then teaches specific training drills and methods for throwing chambered and unchambered kicks practicing proper kicking form training for agility, speed, accuracy and power maximizing your kicking power through lower-body conditioning and employing low kicks tactically.

Low Kicks: Aiming Low For Maximum Punishment In Unarmed Combat. 2/5. Author: Zsuzsanna E. Budapest Business Communication Today chm Spare Me 'The Talk'!

by Fred Hutchinson : Low Kicks: Aiming Low For Maximum Punishment In Unarmed Combat ISBN : Date : 2001-05-01 Description : PDF-e8f05 If you want to acquire the skills needed to defend against larger, stronger adversaries without devoting a lifetime to martial art study, this book offers a viable solution: become an expert low kicker .

Low kicks are also great striking techniques to use to set up other strikes. In the same way punches can cause opponents to divert their focus away from defending attacks to the lower body, using low kicks can bring an opponent’s attention away from defending his upper body, or head area, which will open up him/her up to strikes with more knockout potential. And as mentioned, the lead leg low kick is the most useful low kick to use as a means of setting up other strikes. The muscle group of the medial compartment of the thigh and the calf muscle on the back of the lower leg are the safest areas of the inside leg to target because they are much softer to land on.

If you want to acquire the skills needed to defend against larger, stronger adversaries without devoting a lifetime to martial art study, this book offers a viable solution: become an expert low kicker. The anatomical targets emphasized in most self-defense programs (eyes, throat, testicles) are stunningly effective - if you can hit them. But that's often easier said than done when your adversary is big, mean and coming at you with both fists flying. By comparison, the knees, shins and insteps are relatively easy to hit even without extensive training or above-average strength. In fact, the average person - even the average woman - has enough lower-body strength to deliver a punishing kick to these vital targets. In this book, Fred Hutchinson, author of The Modern Swordsman, offers basic instruction on stance, kick chambering, weight shifting and footwork. He then teaches specific training drills and methods for throwing chambered and unchambered kicks; practicing proper kicking form; training for agility, speed, accuracy and power; maximizing your kicking power through lower-body conditioning; and employing low kicks tactically. Practice them consistently and you will become adept at dealing out destruction with your feet and knees should the need arise.
Reviews: 7
roternow
This book is an excellent well thought-out treaties on low line kicks for maximum punishment below the beltline. For being such a short book it is chuck full of superb information with low line kicking techniques compiled and streamlined from various styles (like Savate, etc.). Additionally the book covers a detailed workout/fitness plan to support the methods covered in the book as well detailed tactical employment consideration. The book has an element of military combatives to it in the practicality of the moves which I found to be enlightening. As well all the moves discussed in the book can be learned in matter of minutes and put to memory with minimal practice. If I was to make one complaint about the book it would have to be about the illustration. They are completely amateurish line drawings that look like my daughter draw them, seriously. But I will say I do not feel that they detracted from the content of the book in anyway. It you find this book interesting I would also look into the DVD seres "Practical Unarmed Combatives" by Michael Janich (incidentally he is the "meat puppet" in the photos and illustrations in this book) who covers low-line kicks in his program. Overall I highly recommend for anyone interested in modern combatives.
Voodoolkree
Fred Hutchinson presents well-grounded practcal self-defense in this fine thin manual. This author has studied and applied various Martial Arts -- Western Sword Arts most in particular. I have found for myself that such Sword Arts add something extra to ones perspective even beyond Cane Arts -- perhaps an even sharper awareness of guarding at all times while attempting to jab-or-cut ones foe and one must stay on-balance and have only a modest set of primary moves -- or one gets CUT ["down-and-dead"].

That may be why "Low Kicks" is so well-ordered for an intensely practical method of self-defense -- with some upper-body moves, such as the Palm Jab, but based-on a modest few low streamlined kicks to lower targets -- not costing one much loss-of-balance and hard-to-defend for a foe. The usual "dirty targets" of other various quick self-defense methods will be naturally expected and countered by most thugs -- who will then box, tackle and strangle the defender into last week. Aikido and Judo applied skills can be great -- but take a great amount of practice to work with real odds of success. The Art as presented in "Low Kicks" is as modest and practical as can be -- and is compatible with many other Arts -- such as Kickboxing, Jiujitsu or Kenpo Arts +++
Kazijora
This is a winner: a real- world way to survive through opponent damage . The kicks are so low and unexpected most attackers have no defense,and they are painful and damaging. Some techniques are difficult but a little practice will give you the ability to cripple opponents, a last-ditch lifesaver.
I'm a Russian Occupant
this book contains kicks that an ordinary person could use for self defense...
if you don't want to spend years perfecting your "jumping spinning back kick" and
hope that you can use it in a real situation then buy this book.
JOGETIME
Straight forward and full of valuable information.
Kale
Fred Hutchinson's Low Kicks is an excellent manual for training the body's most powerful anatomical weapons -- the legs. The manual's format is similar to John Sanchez's Slash and Thrust and Andrea Ferrara's Corsican Steel. (What these manuals share in common is the presentation of training exercises that are independent of style or system. The obvious result is that any reader can benefit from their information regardless of his/her own background, expertise, or combative preferences.) Low Kicks begins by identifying those kicks that Hutchinson considers most appropriate for self defense from the perspective of the reader who cannot train regularly in a dojo. The kicks he recommends are simple in execution and effective in application. Some kicks are drawn from traditional karate, and a few others come from French savate. At least two kicks Hutchinson uses come from WWII Military Combatives, a "style" of combat that has recently developed a large following in the US and Britain. The book then proceeds to reveal a variety of training methods used for making the kicks even more effective. The methods described are such that the reader can utilize them in his den or basement without relying on elaborate equipment or training devices. What is most unique about Low kicks is not only that the author has diligently selected those kicks that work best under a wide range of circumstances, but that the kicks fit in smoothly with the body dynamics used by diverse martial arts systems from karate and savate to ninjutsu and combatives. We have recently made Lopw Kicks required reading in our training halls, and unreservedly recommend it to anyone interested in practical personal protection.
Beanisend
Ah, low kicks, what some would call the "most practical" way to use your feet. This book is pretty much for the novice, but it can certainly add to most folk's arsenal. The best part for me were the training methods to improve accurracy, but they weren't really anything new. The kicks that are covered are classified as either "chambered" or "unchambered", but I did notice that probably the most proven low kick was missing; the Thai round kick to the thigh! This book seems like it was written in the Bruce Tegner days, when Karate, Judo, and Jujitsu were the only Asian arts, and Savate was our (westerners) answer to it. However, if you know nothing about low kicks, and want to get REALLY good at them, then this is the book for you. My major complaints are the poor illustrations (I would have prefered stick figures to these drawings), and the lack of applications. Make no mistake, low kicks are important, but this book is on low kicks only. I think it should be a suplementary text and nothing more.