» » We Own This Game: A Season the in the Adult World of Youth Football
Download We Own This Game: A Season the in the Adult World of Youth Football epub book
ISBN:0802141536
Author: Robert Andrew Powell
ISBN13: 978-0802141538
Title: We Own This Game: A Season the in the Adult World of Youth Football
Format: lrf azw mobi lit
ePUB size: 1172 kb
FB2 size: 1851 kb
DJVU size: 1981 kb
Language: English
Category: Football (American)
Publisher: Grove Press (August 10, 2004)
Pages: 208

We Own This Game: A Season the in the Adult World of Youth Football by Robert Andrew Powell



In 2001, journalist Robert Andrew Powell spent a year following two young teams through rollercoaster seasons. The Liberty City Warriors, former national champs, will suffer the team’s first-ever losing season. TITLE OF BOOK is an inside-the-huddle look into a world of innocence and corruption, where every kickoff bares political, social, and racial implications. By an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in The Best American Sports Writing, it is an unforgettable drama that shows us just what it is to win and to lose in America. A tightly written portrait on a season of youth football in Miami. While youth football should be for the kids, it's serious business for the parents and coaches.

Robert Andrew Powell is the author of This Love Is Not for Cowards: Salvation and Soccer in Ciudad Juárez and We Own This Game, about race and football in Miami, where he lives. This book is not only about gang violence, it is also about how numerous teams fight and scratch for a national title, bragging rights,and a free week at Disney World. And it is about how parents of the players dream of NFL stardom as a ticket out of poverty and the ghetto.

A Season in the Adult World of Youth Football. Robert Andrew Powell. View More by This Author. This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device. A Sports Illustrated Best Book of Year: Vivid portraits of the kids, parents and coaches of the Greater Miami Pop Warner league (Linda Robertson, The Miami Herald). In 2001, journalist Robert Andrew Powell spent a year following two teams through roller-coaster seasons. The Palmetto Raiders, undefeated for two straight years, will be rewarded for good play with limo rides and steak dinners. But their flamboyant coach (the Darth Vader of youth football ) will face defeat in a down-to-the-wire playoff game.

Robert Andrew Powell has worked as a journalist in Miami for ten years. He is a graduate of Ripon College in Wisconsin and Northwestern University in his native Illinois. We Own This Game is his first book. We Own This Game brings to mind Buzz Bissinger’s landmark schoolboy football book, Friday Night Lights, but here the kids are even younger and hungrier and the coaches are even more desperate. If you want to understand why football has become the national pastime, and why young black men dominate the college and professional game today, you should read Robert Andrew Powell’s powerful book. Michael Bamberger, Sports Illustrated staff writer and author of the forthcoming Wonderland. Reprinted with permission from Grove Atlantic, Inc. All rights reserved.

In 2001, award-winning journalist Robert Andrew Powell spent a year following two young teams through roller-coaster seasons. The Liberty City Warriors, former national champs, will suffer their first-ever losing season. The inner-city kids of the Palmetto Raiders, undefeated for two straight years, will be rewarded for good play with limo rides and steak dinners. But their flamboyant coach (the "Darth Vader of youth football") will face defeat in a down-to-the-wire play-off game.

Written by Robert Andrew Powell, Audiobook narrated by Robin Bloodworth. Your audiobook is waitin. e Own This Game. A Season in the Adult World of Youth Football. By: Robert Andrew Powell. Narrated by: Robin Bloodworth. Length: 7 hrs and 10 mins. Portions of this book originally appeared in Miami New Times. Recorded by arrangement with Grove Atlantic, Inc. (P)2014 Audible Inc. More from the same. This Love Is Not for Cowards. by Robert Andrew Powell. Throughout, Powell draws a sharp portrait of Miami: one resident tells him living there is almost-not quite, but almost-like it was being black in the fifties and the sixties ; another explains that, politically, in this town, if you’re not Cuban, you’re nothing. A visceral and direct style makes readers feel the nap of a very rough place in which to survive, let alone grow up. Pub Date: Oct. 27th, 2003.

In 2001, journalist Robert Andrew Powell spent a year following two teams through roller-coaster seasons. The Liberty City Warriors, former national champs, will suffer the team's first-ever losing season. But their flamboyant coach (the "Darth Vader of youth football") will face defeat in a down-to-the-wire playoff game.

We Own This Game: A Season the in the Adult World of Youth Football. Published August 10th 2004 by Grove Press (first published October 2003).

Although its participants are still in grade school, Pop Warner football is serious business in Miami, where local teams routinely advance to the national championships. Games draw thousands of fans; recruiters vie for nascent talent; drug dealers and rap stars bankroll teams; and the stakes are so high that games sometimes end in gunshots. In America’s poorest city, troubled parents dream of NFL stardom for children who long only for a week in Disney World at the Pop Warner Super Bowl.In 2001, journalist Robert Andrew Powell spent a year following two young teams through rollercoaster seasons. The Liberty City Warriors, former national champs, will suffer the team’s first-ever losing season. The inner-city kids of the Palmetto Raiders, undefeated for two straight years, are rewarded for good play with limo rides and steak dinners. But their flamboyant coach (the “Darth Vader of youth football”) will be humbled by defeat in a down-to-the-wire playoff game. TITLE OF BOOK is an inside-the-huddle look into a world of innocence and corruption, where every kickoff bares political, social, and racial implications. By an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in The Best American Sports Writing, it is an unforgettable drama that shows us just what it is to win and to lose in America.INTRODUCTIONA portrait of Miami, a city whose government, even after race riots which crippled the black community in the 80s, serves the interest mostly of the Cuban-American constituency and has been rocked by various political scandals (bribery, fiscal mismanagement, etc.). The author tells how he witnessed inner-city blacks find hope and identity during a high school football semifinal that was attended by tens of thousands. He takes a newspaper assignment covering Pop Warner football games and sees much he admires (“a depressed community proud that its boys could do something better than anyone else”) but also “the corruption of sport at its infancy” (recruiting, fans assaulting the coach after the team’s only loss, parents living through their kids, gambling, etc.). He quits his job to cover a season of Pop Warner, from the first day to the last game, attending every single season and game of the 95-pound Gwen Cherry Bulls, whose coach is dubbed the ‘Darth Vadar of Pop Warner’.PrologueRegistration day. Coach Brian Johnson of the Liberty City Warriors is introduced as he prints out ridiculously complicated game strategies for his team, based on the Georgia Southern Eagles game plans. It is his first year as head coach and he is determined to prove himself. “I wouldn’t be a man if I didn’t aspire to run my own team.”We’re introduced to the “Darth Vadar of Pop Warner” Raul Campos, the ostentatious coach of the 110-pound Palmetto Raiders, who is editing a video hyping his team as the greatest of all time, winners of back-to-back national champions at Disney World Sport Center, undefeated in the last 2 seasons.We’re introduced to Diamond Pless, a young kid whose uncle was confined to a wheelchair after a shooting with a rival drug dealer, and who is now helping his uncle live his dream of NFL superstardom vicariouslyWe’re introduced to Mark Peterson, the head of the league who tries without much success to discourage the recruitment of black inner city players to suburban ballparks, and is still torn over last year’s national championship, where a Suniland team made up mostly of recruits won 56-6. The coach lost his job because he ran up the store, but is suing to be reinstated.CHAPTER ONE: First PracticeThe first practice, plus a history of Pop Warner football, the largest youth football league in America, started in 1929 in Philly to prevent youth crime and eventually to over 6,000 teams nationally competing to play in the national champion at Disney World.CHAPTER TWO: Liberty CityA tour of Liberty City—past the wealthy enclaves of Miami and the poverty of Little Havana is a black neighborhood torn by race riots in the 80s and gang-related assassinations in the 90s. The neighborhood grew out of a black ghetto called Nigger Town which eventually became a progressive experimental black-only community named Knight Manor until a highway ran through it and tore the neighborhood apart. This is wear porno rapper Luther Campbell of 2 Live Crew comes from, who helped found the Liberty City program. Since then, the Warriors have won city championships in 7 of 8 weight divisions and have spawned other all-black parks.CHAPTER THREE: CAMPOSInside the home of the Cuban exile turned real estate wizard Coach Campos, who is hated and called a “cracker” and takes his players to games in chartered motor coaches and used to take them in Hummer limos. After being banned from another Pop Warner team, Campos took over the Palmetto team comprised mostly of white suburban kids and replaced them with mostly black players recruited from West Perrine via varsity letter jackets, steak dinnnnnnners, etc.CHAPTER FOUR: DIAMONDDiamond’s mom tries to petition for him to get a larger role on the team, but Diamond doesn’t show much promise. Diamond’s uncle Durell describes his gun injury.CHAPTER FIVE: SUNILANDWe’re introduced to Phillip, whose father is dead from AIDS and whose HIV+ mother’s behavior is erratic because of drugs. He is often left to his own devices. He sees football as his way out. We’re introduced to the Suniland Devils, a suburban team comprised of recruited back players whose coach Gator Rebhan was banned after he ran up the score in a championship game. Rebhan thinks the League is jealous because he took a white ballpark and made it successful.CHAPTER SIX: GOULDSThe history of the Railroad Shop, a black settlement that developed nearly a century ago, was condemned by the city, but eventually turned black again. Now Goulds is black and poor. In their first game, Liberty City loses to Goulds, with Coach Johnson’s playbook proving way too complex for the pee wees.CHAPTER SEVEN: SEPTEMBER 11Warriors lose their second game. News of 9/11 comes, but Florida is very removed from the goings-on in NYC and Washington. The coaches convene at the field despite cancelled games and try to make sense of things.CHAPTER EIGHT: McADOOWe’re introduced to shadowy figure named McAdoo, who “takes care” of high school and college players in vague ways. He’s a street agent, of which every major college sports program has at least one. They operate under the radar, even going so far as to buy cars for young players even though he has no traceable source of income besides selling watermelons and gambling. He points out all of the players he “raised”— rappers, NFL players, etc. McAdoo’s cash flow is “supplemented by his relationships with some of Liberty City’s more prominent entrepreneurs,” including drug dealers and gang members. McAdoo has switched his focus from encouraging kids to go into football to encouraging them to read.CHAPTER NINE: LIBERTY CITY AT PALMETTOLiberty City is now 1-4 and their chances at the championship are slipping. A player is hit hard and has to go to the hospital in an ambulance. Coach Johnson is questioning why he even bothers.CHAPTER ELEVEN: PLEXThe story of drug-related gang violence in Liberty City. Gang members bet up to $10,000 and intimidated coaches and player. Diamond’s father-in-law “Plex” was arrested for a murder associated with protecting the distribution channels of a crack laboratory. He is serving 5 life sentences.CHAPTER ELEVEN: ELECTIONThe Elian Gonzalez debacle, and how it further turned the black community against the Cubans. The Warriors win a game.CHAPTER THIRTEEN: THE GAMEA story about a legendary street game decades ago between a group of white kids and black kids. The black kids
Reviews: 4
Lo◘Ve
Its a must have. As a Miami native and youth football coach, I found that it details all the sad but true aspects of the real Miami-Life. It isnt all beaches and palm trees down here. The book does a great job educating on the history of Miami and the dirty politics in youth football. I was hoping there was a part two or a follow up five to ten years after but nothing as yet. I wasn't able to put it down. Great book for any parent who has a child in youth sports(especially in MIAMI).
Munimand
In the black neighborhoods of Miami, there's one game in town. Miami journalist Robert Andrew Powell opens the curtain on the huge subculture of youth football in We Own This Game: A Season in the Adult World of Youth Football. If you, like me, have not been exposed to this scene, you're in for an eye-opener.

These kids, post-toddler to teen, play football in a league that's as competitive and elaborate as many high school teams. Some of their games have higher attendance than college games I've seen. They tailgate, have DJs and snack bars, travel to games in charter buses, have corporate sponsors. It sounds like a spectacle.

Powell follows on team through a season, introducing us to the coaches, players, parents, and sponsors who make it all happen. As the subtitle suggests, the league gets so adult that I had to constantly remind myself that the players are little children. It frequently seemed to me that the coaches could have used a reminder as well. The way they push the kids, the language they use, the weight they place on the games all seem too intense. I know I wouldn't want my kid in this environment.

Rapper and producer Luther Campbell, whose cash has bankrolled the league, talks about the importance of youth football to the black community: "We own this game. I mean, you can take whatever you want to take—our land, our housing, our jobs, whatever. But we got our dignity and our pride. We might not have ever had any leader to lead us to the promised land, but at least we got our football. We own football."

The larger story in Campbell's quote, and in the book as a whole, is the story of blacks in Miami. Despite being the oldest minority group in Miami, through discrimination and unjust treatment, poverty and segregation persist. In spite of the success of Campbell and a few others, Miami has a very small black middle class. In between the football games, Powell tells the story of segregation and injustice.

Yes, it's a book about youth football. But on a greater level, Powell writes about the history and culture of blacks living in Miami. It's an enjoyable, enlightening book.
Netlandinhabitant
This book is about inner city youth football in Miami , Florida. The stakes are very high. Drug dealers and pro athletes bankroll teams, and gangs hang out and roam the park that they play in. Sometimes drug dealers bet as much as one thousand dollars to one million dollars. Things like that can get very intense and scary. For example, in 2002 a gangster shot his gun in the air in order to stop the game becuase he was losing a 20,000 dollar bet. Fortunately nobody was hurt and the game was not ended, but it can be very scary for players ,coaches ,and spectators.

This book is not only about gang violence, it is also about how numerous teams fight and scratch for a national title, bragging rights,and a free week at Disney World.And it is about how parents of the players dream of NFL stardom as a ticket out of poverty and the ghetto.

Reading this book was very interesting.While reading it I found out how scary a Pop Warner football game could get.I also made a comparision between football in Maine , and in Florida, and instantly knew the difference was that the fans are different and laid back in Maine and do't have drug dealers and gangsters controling the outcome of the game.also in Maine the fans don't bet heavily on a certain number of games .Anoyher thing i found was that the parents take winning more seriouslythen the players. But I would tell anybody to read this book becuase even if you don,t like football it give you a little taste of life on and off the field in Florida

Anthony Stewart
Cobandis
For anyone who has participated in youth football to any degree, this book will bring back a lot of memories (good and bad). I am a Floridian living in Texas. I cannot begin to count the number of arguments I have had with Texans concerning Texas vs. Florida football. I was really hoping this book would show up Friday Night Lights and prove that FLA reigns supreme. Sadly for me, it did not do the trick. This is a quick read and will entertain, but it lacks some of the emotional depth of F.N.L. This may be more of a regional favorite describing South Florida very well, but I'm not sure New Englanders or those in the Midwest would find much of the cultural and geographical references all that interesting. I did like it, but just not enough to recommend buying it.