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Download The Perfection Point: Sport Science Predicts the Fastest Man, the Highest Jump, and the Limits of Athletic Performance epub book
ISBN:0061845450
Author: John Brenkus
ISBN13: 978-0061845451
Title: The Perfection Point: Sport Science Predicts the Fastest Man, the Highest Jump, and the Limits of Athletic Performance
Format: mobi rtf lrf lit
ePUB size: 1709 kb
FB2 size: 1439 kb
DJVU size: 1447 kb
Language: English
Category: Deliver toandnbsp;Russian Federation
Publisher: Harper; First Edition edition (August 31, 2010)
Pages: 256

The Perfection Point: Sport Science Predicts the Fastest Man, the Highest Jump, and the Limits of Athletic Performance by John Brenkus



What's the fastest a human can run the 100-meter sprint? What's the longest a human can hold his breath? What are the limits of human performance? Welcome to The Perfection Point. The answer lies in The Perfection Point. In this fascinating and thought-provoking book, John Brenkus, the host, co-creator, and executive producer of ESPN's Sport Science, ventures across the sports world to provide an in-depth look at the absolute limits of human performance. Beginning with the current world records for a variety of sports, Brenkus finds the perfection point for each, zeroing in on the speeds, heights, distances, and times that humans will get closer to but never exceed

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In The Perfection Point, John Brenkus, host and creator of ESPN’s Emmy Award-winning Sport Science. The author, host of ESPN’s Sport Science, begins with Roger Bannister’s 1954 breaking of the four-minute mile. Many people had seriously wondered if this landmark could ever be achieved, but after Bannister did it, more than 300 people followed suit over the next decade. That happened not only because Bannister proved it could be done (and so inspired others to try) but also because human beings are getting faster and stronger, and athletic techniques are constantly being refined and augmented.

The Perfection Point book. The Perfection Point is ideal for sports fans interested in the scientific basis of athletic excellence and a fascinating read for science fans interested in the physics of sports.

The Perfection Point is ideal for sports fans interested in the scientific basis of athletic excellence and a fascinating read for science fans interested in the physics of sports.

The Perfection Point: Sport Science Predicts the Fastest Man, the Highest Jump, and the Limits of Athletic Performance (2010, HarperCollins). Ray of Hope Foundation is dedicated to uplifting those in dire need through sharing personalized videos – rays of hope – from the many luminaries and game-changers who support our charitable purpose. Every textbook comes with a 21-day "Any Reason" guarantee.

The Perfection Point: Sport Science Predicts the Fastest Man, the Highest Jump, and the Limits of Athletic Performance. In 1954 athlete Roger Bannister did the absolute impossible: he was able to complete a mile in less than four minutes. The whole world was stunned by this seemingly superhuman achievement. Two months later, fellow runner John Landy broke the barrier as well. Currently, the record is three minutes and 43 seconds. Over the past decades, athletes have become faster, stronger and overall better at sports.

Here’s a fascinating exploration of the limits of human athletic ability. But here’s the book’s most arresting element: using a variety of disciplines, including physics and physiology, Brenkus extrapolates into the future, showing us when we will reach our absolute limit of performance. For example, he posits that the fastest time a human will ever post in the hundred-yard dash will be . 9 seconds, about 900 years from now (he also explains why this will be the absolute limit); similarly, somewhere around 2672, breath-holding ability will top out at about 14 minutes and 47 seconds.

In The Perfection Point, John Brenkus, host and creator of ESPN’s Emmy Award-winning “Sport Science,” uses hard data and scientific research to uncover the absolute limits of human performance. The Perfection Point is ideal for sports fans interested in the scientific basis of athletic excellence and a fascinating read for science fans interested in the physics of sports.

Reviews: 7
Murn
I really enjoyed, fun read. Interesting to find out the nuances of calculating the peak performance in the different sports and what it would take to get there. It also showed how some things are not straight forward any regards to evaluation. I really enjoyed.
MegaStar
AUTHOUR interpetation is the best I have seen in terms of understand mid range altheletes. Wish he would have gone into what ESPN and other shows show the full breadth of the player and timing it takes to be a World Champion.
Vital Beast
Interesting but kinda lightweight.
Macill
Great condition.
Mr.jeka
Great read... Especially if you love the Sports Science stuff on ESPN. This book does a great job explaining very complicated material into lay terms for the average Joe that loves sports. I would recommend this book to anyone that is interested in sports it explains the amazing things you see athletes do everyday in an interesting way!
Detenta
My 14-year old science-loving son enjoys watching "Sport Science" clips on YouTube, plus he constantly asks questions about the limits of human performance. What is the highest possible dunk? The fastest possible 100m? The mightiest possible power lift? I thought that this book would be a definite hit for him. We pre-ordered the book and it arrived yesterday. I got a chance to read it before my son got home and knew that he would really enjoy it. When he saw the book he immediately rushed to read it. Of course, he wanted to just get to The Numbers at first:) John Brenkus (who is the host of Sport Science) does a wonderful job of making this topic fun and interesting, plus he does a nice job on the analytical bits where he explains how he (or rather the experts he quotes) actually get to The Numbers.

One quibble: The book keeps on going on about what we could theoretically eventually achieve in time, but - hey - we will be a different species by then given our rate of evolution. Huh? According to one expert, we are a different species than we were 200 years ago and we will certainly be a different species in a 1000 years. Hmmm. Strange.

Remember this book is full of statistical models about theoretical maximums. [Note: I am a statistician by training so I appreciate statistical models for what they are.] There is certainly no guarantee that humans will reach these theoretical maximums, but remember these are just that - theoretical maximums. A human will NEVER run a 100m faster than 8.99 seconds. Will he ever reach the theoretical maximum? Maybe, maybe not. He will approach the theoretical maximum, but he never will surpass it because he never can surpass it due to human limitations. (This is where the different species stuff comes in; a different species of human - one more "evolved" - would have different limitations, and, thus, different theoretical maximums and all that).

Now that man has goals to aim for, he will certainly have a better shot at reaching the theoretical maximums. Thank you, John Brenkus, and good luck, mankind!
Grari
Interesting book for the most part. I think it would have been better if they hadn't wasted so much time on fictional stories from the future, but overall a good read.
Different but interesting and practical take on sports and the sportsmen ability to conquer the challenges, more importantly putting a number on it and then reasoning it to provide answers