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ISBN:0743245911
Author: Jonathan Eig
ISBN13: 978-0743245913
Title: Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig
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ePUB size: 1324 kb
FB2 size: 1313 kb
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Language: English
Category: Biographies
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; 1 edition (March 29, 2005)
Pages: 432

Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig by Jonathan Eig



Eig sets the record straight on what makes Gehrig seem larger than life. For example, the myth that Gehrig began his streak of 2,130 consecutive games played because Wally Pipp complained of a headache and was replaced by Gehrig is set straight in the book. The streak actually began the previous day when Gehrig appeared as a pinch hitter. Also, Pipp did not complain of a headache that day and instead was benched when manager Miller Huggins wanted to juggle his lineup

Luckiest Man is now the definitive life of Gehrig. Henry Kisor, Chicago Sun-Times. Luckiest Man stands in the first rank of sports biographies. Jonathan Eig is a former senior special writer for The Wall Street Journal. A superbly told tale of the life and death of one of baseball's all-time greats. If you thought you'd heard everything there is to know about this powerful yet gentle man, grab a copy of this book and start reading. From Lou's early family life, through high school and then into baseball at Columbia and finally the Yankees, Gehrig's story is compelling, star-studded and wonderfully presented. His tragic battle with ALS, still at an age where he could easily have rewritten baseball's record book, unfolds in heartbreaking detail.

Publisher: Simon & Schuster Published: 2010-05-11 ISBN: 9781439126448.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 669-729).

Lou Gehrig was a baseball legend-the Iron Horse, the stoic New York Yankee who was the greatest first baseman in history, a man whose consecutive-games streak was ended by a horrible disease that now bears his name.

Lou Gehrig started his professional baseball career at a time when players began to be seen as national celebrities. He is the author of ""Luckiest Man& The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig"".

Book by Jonathan Eig, Jonathan Eig (introduction and notes). Audiobook Narrator: Edward Herrmann. Length: 5 hour 46 min. Release Date: 19-NOV-10. Download Now View Coupon. Discount up to 70% on monthly membership. Register Downpour membership to download audiobook and save up to 70% off. Unsatisfied about any reason, you may cancel membership without penalty. Join Now View Coupon.

But Luckiest Man reveals that Gehrig was afflicted with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) much sooner than anyone believes, as early as the spring of 1938. Despite the illness, he didn’t miss a game that year, keeping intact his astonishing consecutive-games streak, which stood for more than half a century. In Luckiest Man, Jonathan Eig brings to life a figure whose shyness and insecurity obscured his greatness during his lifetime. Gehrig emerges as more human and more heroic than ever. Announce URL: udp://9. Despite the illness, he didn't miss a game that year, keeping intact his astonishing consecutive-games streak, which stood for more than half a century.

Draws on hundreds of new interviews and previously unpublished letters to present a comprehensive account of the life of the Hall of Fame ballplayer whose career was cut short by the disease now named for him, in a portrait that shares background details about his rivalry with Babe Ruth, the onset of his illness, and the final years of his life. 100,000 first printing.
Reviews: 7
Jek
A superbly told tale of the life and death of one of baseball's all-time greats. If you thought you'd heard everything there is to know about this powerful yet gentle man, grab a copy of this book and start reading. From Lou's early family life, through high school and then into baseball at Columbia and finally the Yankees, Gehrig's story is compelling, star-studded and wonderfully presented. His tragic battle with ALS, still at an age where he could easily have rewritten baseball's record book, unfolds in heartbreaking detail. Through it all, we see what an amazing soul Gehrig was, and how his understated lifestyle compared with most of the ballplayers of yesterday and today set him apart. Jonathan Eig's treatment of this amazing story makes this a biography for the ages. Again, no matter how much you thought you knew about Lou Gehrig, even after seeing the Gary Cooper film about his life, you'll enjoy and learn from this fine book.
Hatе&love
This is a terrifically well researched and well written biography. Especially the way the author has corrected various previously published accounts of Lou Gehrig's life and times. The reader is drawn in to Lou's psyche exceptionally deep; his interaction with his teammates, for example, including and especially Babe Ruth. And the author knows baseball too, and understands the situations where a double or home run is just another home run (like where your team is already up ten runs in the eighth inning), and where it's a game changer.
The included photos don't display on the Kindle as well as a reader would like, as you already know.
I highly recommend this book. I've read several biographies of Gehrig which don't do much more than recite his baseball career.
Did you know that there is actually no recording of Lou's final farewell speech? But the author was able to painstakingly piece together what Lou actually said by reviewing what the dozens of reporters wrote afterwards. The stadium, including the press box, was dead silent as Lou spoke. No one thought to record the speech.
Zacki
This book is many things. I came to it knowing almost nothing about Lou Gehrig other The the iconic facts. Obviously I knew his fate before starting the book, but the author’s ability to describe his life and times put that into the background until toward the end. Then the haunting knowledge of what was to come seeped in. I wanted to believe “50-50” along with Lou.

It is a heartbreaking story in many ways but it is poignant, uplifting, fun, heartwarming, historically interesting, and much more. Thank you Jonathan Eig for allowing me to get to know this outstanding person.
Yozshujinn
Lou Gehrig was one of baseball’s greatest players, yet for so long the tragedy of his short life has been a notable characteristic of his legacy. With the discovery of personal letters to and from one of his doctors the normally reserved Gehrig provides special insights to his life. The wonderfully crafted narrative includes comments from players that played with and against him, and some were interviewed during their final years. A fine range of other sources all combine to construct Gehrig as a humble man with incredible baseball talent. He was grateful for all that life gave him and it is impossible to not be inspired by such a remarkable person.

Nicholas R.W. Henning – Australian Baseball Author
NI_Rak
When Amazon emailed me about this book as a daily deal, I realized that I didn't know anything about Lou Gehrig except that he was one of the Yankee superstars and that he died of Lou Gehrig's disease. So, I gave it a try and I'm glad that I did.

This is such a well written book that I felt as though it were the story of a dear friend and his death. I cared about him in a way I didn't expect. For example. during the time before he got married, when, according to the author, Gehrig wanted to meet women but was so shy he couldn't get up the nerve to talk to them, I wanted to grab him and introduce him to my single friends. I liked Lou a lot.

I've always felt put off by Babe Ruth, he was just too drunk, too much of a womanizer, too much of a glutton for me to care much about him. But in this book, I even started to see the caring side of Ruth and actually ended up liking him a bit. A totally unexpected result of reading this book.

Some reviewers seem to feel that there is too much about ALS and not enough about baseball. I would have liked more about ALS and less play-by-play, but that's a hard call to make and I think the author did a good job keeping a middle course.

I am not giving this 5 stars because of the formatting errors/typos on the Kindle edition. In many places a long quote starts correctly indented than becomes unindented making you have to really work at figuring out what is a quote and what isn't. Towards the end I was so moved that I was crying, then i'd hit one of these "is this a quote or what" places and get annoyed. Maybe that was good because it stopped my crying, but ...