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Download The 100 Thing Challenge: How I Got Rid of Almost Everything, Remade My Life, and Regained My Soul epub book
ISBN:0061787744
Author: Dave Bruno
ISBN13: 978-0061787744
Title: The 100 Thing Challenge: How I Got Rid of Almost Everything, Remade My Life, and Regained My Soul
Format: mobi doc docx txt
ePUB size: 1454 kb
FB2 size: 1236 kb
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Language: English
Category: Motivational
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Original edition (December 28, 2010)
Pages: 224

The 100 Thing Challenge: How I Got Rid of Almost Everything, Remade My Life, and Regained My Soul by Dave Bruno



Dave Bruno relates how he remade his life and regained his soul by getting rid of almost everything. But The 100 Thing Challenge is more than just the story of how one man started a movement to unhook himself from consumerism by winnowing his life’s possessions down to 100 things in one year.

However, the book itself is mediocre at best. While a great idea man, Mr. Munro is not a talented author. While a great idea, the 100 Thing Challenge is not suited to a book as much as it is a blog. My recommendation is that you definitely read his blog or see him speak, and then spend your time reading a better book (remember, enjoying the life you live is part of his message). Purchasing the book comes with a bit of irony, of course

Dave Bruno offers compelling anecdotes and practical advice to help readers live more meaningfully, simply by casting off the unnecessary "stuff" that clutters their lives. The 100 Thing Challenge is a golden opportunity to experience the positive changes that occur as you defiantly hop off the treadmill of consumerism. ISBN 13: 9780061787744.

The 100 Thing Challenge: How I Got Rid of Almost Everything, Remade My Life, and Regained My Soul. Download (epub, 238 Kb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

About book: thought provoking. Doesn't even explain what the challenge is until the 5th chapter. Can't go any further. Little Kids, Big City: Tales from a Real House in New York City (With Lessons on Life and Love for Your Own Concrete Jungle). This New and Poisonous Air. Uncle. Other books by Dave Bruno. El reto de las 100 cosas. La sfida delle 100 cose.

A cause for pause, The 100 Thing Challenge is a response to the culture of materialism in America, one that has filled our lives with the constant and unsatisfactory desire for "more. Dave Bruno offers compelling anecdotes and practical advice to help readers live more meaningfully, simply by casting off the unnecessary "stuff" that clutters their lives.

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San Diego man Dave Bruno whittled down the number of things he owned down to fewer than 100 items for a year - and found less stuff can mean more jo. That book’s now been turned into a book published earlier this month: The 100 Thing Challenge: How I Got Rid of Almost Everything, Remade My Life, and Regained My Soul. Now, before you get too excited, Bruno’s 100 things didn’t include a lot of objects that you and I may consider individual things. Then he counted whole groups of items - most notably, books - as a single object.

The 100 Thing Challenge: How I Got Rid of Almost Everything,. Remade My Life, and Regained My Soul" by Dave Bruno. William Morrow Paperbacks. The+100+Thing+Challenge+by+Dave+Bruno. clipped from Google - 3/2019 ww. xbowschool. am always alarmed by the amount of things I do not use. I spend the. is the 100 thing challenge, a way of life that author Dave Bruno introduced to the world. clipped from Google - 3/2019. Unit Title: Observational Drawing: Still Life Self Portrait.

“Reading this will lead you to a better life.”—Dean Nelson, author of God Hides in Plain Sight

 

In The 100 Thing Challenge Dave Bruno relates how he remade his life and regained his soul by getting rid of almost everything. But The 100 Thing Challenge is more than just the story of how one man started a movement to unhook himself from consumerism by winnowing his life’s possessions down to 100 things in one year. It’s also an inspiring, invigorating guide to how we all can begin to live simpler, more meaningful lives.

Reviews: 7
Venemarr
For context, I leave very few reviews & they are mostly positive.

The best things I can say about this book:
1) it is a quick read--mostly because I skimmed large sections of nostalgia about train sets & wood shops
2) it will be immediately eliminated from my "100 things."

If you see this on a garage sale/used book bin & are curious, read the epilogue (p189-197) which has a few practical suggestions--"reduce, refuse, rejigger"--that are common sense mixed with experience-based knowledge.

The author's 100 things list (p101-102) provides insight into the type of person the author is/wants to be, but beyond that isn't helpful beyond seeing that it's okay to count "library" as one item?! lol.

Bottom line: I celebrate the author's personal growth & catchy title, but this book is a waste of your time & money.
Gold Crown
Before I received this book I've already read some comments here and have expectation how this book will look like. But after giving it a wholehearted try I am still shelled shocked how a book can be contentless and stupid. What I expected to read is the "challenge", but Mr Bruno spent more than first half of the total length of this book endlessly telling the background, the opening part, before unwillingly unfolding the real content, which is also with not much surprise and real excitement. I took two more minutes to conclude that this book is a TOTALLY WASTE of money and time. If it is published as a free blog article, with a proper length (not a book) I would give it a like. Now it costed me a few dollars (a discount is still expensive for such quality) and cost me valuable 10 minutes or so. I will honestly pay careful attention to comment here before I make other book purchase in the future.
Fegelv
I wish I hadn't bought this book. Not that it is a bad book, per se, but it's not a particularly insightful one, nor one I should have purchased. And here's the irony: it's a book about keeping a minimal number of items (which involves cutting down on purchases), and I was so anxious to read it that I convinced myself I couldn't wait for it to be returned to library. So I bought it. And went "eh."

Why? Well, I read a lot of books along the minimalism/simple living/voluntary simplicity/cutting down on consumption vein, and this one isn't particularly noteworthy. Sure, the guy's a good writer, he had some good personal insights during his 100 Thing Challenge, but there's not much to take away from it that I didn't already know: tons of possessions and constant consumerism aren't necessary for a good, happy life (and at times will even block us from it), change doesn't happen until we stop talking about it and actually do it, etc. Other books are more insightful, useful, and interesting. This one is mainly fluff--good perhaps for someone just introduced to the ideas discussed within, not so much for someone who is more familiar with the topic. None of this makes is it a bad book, not at all; it's just not what I was hoping for, which is certainly not the author's fault.
Alsanadar
The 100 Thing Challenge has a great message - quit buying useless "stuff" and start enjoying the "living" part of your life. However, the book itself is mediocre at best. While a great idea man, Mr. Munro is not a talented author. While a great idea, the 100 Thing Challenge is not suited to a book as much as it is a blog. My recommendation is that you definitely read his blog or see him speak, and then spend your time reading a better book (remember, enjoying the life you live is part of his message).

Purchasing the book comes with a bit of irony, of course. Should I add it to your "thing" list, or borrow someone else's copy? My thought at the time of purchase - if I was going to read it there was no need to deprive the author of his income stream. I don't regret making the purchase, I simply regret slogging through the entire thing.
Dobpota
Seems like enough ideas here for an excellent blog, bloated into a book. Too much filler and too many musings for this to be a great book.

The central notion that we should find a personal path to reduced consumerism is excellent, but for the people who bought this book, that's preaching to the converted.

And speaking of preaching, the fact that Bruno's quest is rooted in his Christian spirituality is certainly relevant to share, but I was surprised to read him agree with a friend's observation that a single woman he ran into while camping alone was "Satan." Now, how would she feel about that?

I also found it odd, in a book that that's supposed to help us fight consumerism, advertising and enticing brands, that Bruno's "things" discussions includes item model names such as his "Apple Macbook Pro." Any book fighting consumerism should want to avoid any appearance of product placement.