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ISBN:0156033801
Author: Joan Wickersham
ISBN13: 978-0156033800
Title: The Suicide Index: Putting My Father's Death in Order
Format: doc lrf docx lrf
ePUB size: 1292 kb
FB2 size: 1222 kb
DJVU size: 1627 kb
Language: English
Category: Death and Grief
Publisher: Mariner Books; First edition (June 23, 2009)
Pages: 330

The Suicide Index: Putting My Father's Death in Order by Joan Wickersham



The Suicide Index book. This is a common reaction in dealing with a completed suicide: you can say it's because of moral failings or relationship trouble or job loss, but you really have no idea what it was that pushed this person over the edge

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Topics Wickersham, Joan, Adult children, Children of suicide victims, Suicide, Suicide victims. Publisher Orlando : Harcourt. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; openlibraries; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

Dear Joan, Your book, The Suicide Index is nothing short of riveting. Written with such HEART and such BEAUTY and maybe mostly-COURAGE. The book, The Suicide Index, is her attempt to explore the events, thoughts, and feelings surrounding this catastrophic event in her life. I wasn't certain, in the beginning, if I would like this work with such a morbid theme. But, Wickersham wrote in a style that was both creative yet one in which the reader could relate.

National Book Award Finalist: Wickersham has journeyed into the dark underworld inside her father and herself and emerged with a powerful, gripping story. One winter morning in 1991, Joan Wickershams father shot himself in the head. The father she loved would never have killed himself, and yet he had. His death made a mystery of his entire life.

One winter morning in 1991, Joan Wickersham’s father shot himself in the head. Every bit of family history, every encounter with friends, doctors, and other survivors, exposes another facet of elusive truth

Her eldest son, 3 at the time of his grandfather's suicide, grows up to be a depressed teenager, "seeing a psychiatrist, taking medication. Some days he can't get out of be. This is loaded material, and not just because of what the author reveals about her own child

Sixteen years ago, Wickersham's father's suicide made a mystery of his entire life. Joan Wickersham is the author of the novel The Paper Anniversary. Her work has appeared in the Best American Short Stories series. She lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Sixteen years ago, Joan Wickersham’s father shot himself in the head. Every bit of family history-marriage, parents, business failures-and every encounter with friends, doctors, and other survivors exposes another facet of elusive truth.

Sixteen years ago, Joan Wickersham's father shot himself in the head. Every bit of family history, marriage, parents, business failures, and every encounter with friends, doctors, and other survivors exposes another facet of elusive truth.

When you kill yourself, you kill every memory everyone has of you. You’re saying “I’m gone and you can’t even be sure who it is that’s gone, because you never knew me.”

Sixteen years ago, Joan Wickersham’s father shot himself in the head. The father she loved would never have killed himself, and yet he had. His death made a mystery of his entire life. Using an index—that most formal and orderly of structures—Wickersham explores this chaotic and incomprehensible reality. Every bit of family history—marriage, parents, business failures—and every encounter with friends, doctors, and other survivors exposes another facet of elusive truth. Dark, funny, sad, and gripping, at once a philosophical and deeply personal exploration, The Suicide Index is, finally, a daughter’s anguished, loving elegy to her father.

Reviews: 7
interactive man
Dear Joan,
Your book, The Suicide Index is nothing short of riveting. Written with such HEART and such BEAUTY and maybe mostly—COURAGE. Alas, I am your new number one fan.
I have yet to read a book that reaches where yours does to find out/seek/dig at the truth, meaning, and repercussions of suicide. There isn’t a stone unturned in your three-hundred some pages, not a consequence unrealized or unrecognized. I see you telling the story your father could not. I see you giving his suicide ultimate voice.
Mental health continues to have such stigma, and that’s another reason your book touched me so deeply. Thank you for unabashedly shedding an artistic light on such a deeply personal issue.
You are so truly gifted, and I am planning to reread your book sooner than later to study the structure and narrative arc more deeply.
Sincerely,
Robyn
Kegal
Dark and tragic. I used this book for a research paper I was writing. Biography. It really shows the impact that happens on family when a loved one dies by suicide. It can really increase understanding, but REMEMBER it is only ONE perspective and ONE story. Everyone experiences complicated reactions to such a tragedy and learning the stories and understanding that they are all different and difficult helps to greater the understanding of the people and the world around us.
Nuadador
Hard as it is to read about suicide, this one is explored with such heartfelt questions that it seemed more like a mystery than memoir. The format of the index also held my attention and became a haunting structural device.
Cells
I'm not sure I have ever read a book so nearly unrelievedly grim as The Suicide Index. While there are flashes of humor here and there - of the gallows variety - the tone of this memoir is, for the most part, pretty sobering, sad and, most of all, I think, angry. The anger is directed at, in nearly equal parts, the author's father, who did the ghastly deed, and her mother, who may well have been at least partly responsible for her husband's poor career decisions, most certainly for their hopeless financial plight, and probably for his obvious feelings of inadequacy and despair. In any case, I can understand why the book was a finalist for the National Book Award. The writing is beautiful and conveys in both heartbreakingly personal and coldly objective terms the ever-widening ripples and repercussions of this oh-so desperate and final act. In that respect, it is an admirably professional piece of work. Even so, this book-long meditaion of self-murder could hardly be called a pleasant read, and not a book I could heartily recommend. It was, in my experience, one excruciatingly long wince. I can't even begin to imagine how painful it must have been for Wickersham to write it. Cathartic, I'm sure, but it also had to hurt like hell. - Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, BOOKLOVER
Jelar
Joan Wickersham experienced one of the most dreadful events that one could experience - the suicide of her father. The book, The Suicide Index, is her attempt to explore the events, thoughts, and feelings surrounding this catastrophic event in her life. I wasn't certain, in the beginning, if I would like this work with such a morbid theme. But, Wickersham wrote in a style that was both creative yet one in which the reader could relate. I pulled for her throughout and my empathy for her grew with each turn of the page. There are few books that I've read which I would claim that the author is a creative genius, but, this is clearly one of those books. I very highly recommend reading this book to anyone contemplating suicide, directly affected by suicide, or those who work with these individuals. I give this an A+!!!
Mori
Wickersham looks behind the scenes of her father's life to try to find the answer to "why". A troubled marriage, a difficult childhood spent in two countries with very narcissistic parents, bad-luck in business...all these factors (and many more) contribute to the troubled mind of Wickersham's father when he committed suicide at the age of 61.

Wickersham doesn't seem to come to any certain conclusions of the decisive reason her father did what he did, but she does piece "things" together to help herself cope with the act, both at the time and in the years following his death.

She's a good writer and the words flow with a deft fluency.
Uaha
Adding this to my personal library. It was something I read to help me understand the aftermath of suicide, which oddly enough, helped me through some pretty rough times.
I don't know why I chose to read a book with the word suicide in it, maybe it was the reviews. Maybe it was my cuosity about someone else's tragedy. After all, no one thinks it could happen in their family. Anyway, I'm glad I bought did. I never before understood the long term ramifications that such an act has on those left behind until I read this memoir. I was very impressed with the author's ability to express her emotions in such a personal way. Ms. Wickemsham is a very talented writer. I have just ordered her first novel.