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ISBN:0312868847
Author: Rudy Rucker
ISBN13: 978-0312868840
Title: Saucer Wisdom
Format: azw mbr lrf lit
ePUB size: 1905 kb
FB2 size: 1898 kb
DJVU size: 1380 kb
Language: English
Category: Technology
Publisher: Forge Books; 1st edition (July 16, 1999)
Pages: 304

Saucer Wisdom by Rudy Rucker



With Saucer Wisdom Rucker has reached a new peak. Saucer Wisdom is absolutely one of the best books of the year. grown up, elucidating the wild-eyed, gonzo ideas of his youth with the clear-eyed, well-honed craft of a mature writer at his creative peak. Groove to a mind-expanding leap into the future. How delightful it was to open up Rudy Rucker’s latest madcap fantasy, Saucer Wisdom. Of all the new science-fiction writers, it is Rucker who most nearly approaches Dick’s imaginative mania. It’s brilliantly funny, prescient, and as fully engaging as a coffee-fueled late-night conversation with a slightly manic genius. From the aloof-yet-naughty aliens.

Saucer Wisdom by Rudy Rucker - Author Rudy Rucker offers a one-of-a-kind history of the future in this staggeringly inventive metafictional novel involving. Praise for Saucer Wisdom. A pop-science book like no other. Nick Herbert, author of Quantum Reality

Rudy Rucker made up the flying saucer part. There is no actual flying saucer. The saucer is not an interplanetary faster-than-light device. Its what we professional authors like to call a narrative device. I'm going to spill the beans as directly as I can here: Saucer Wisdom is a work of popular science speculation. Its a nonfiction book in which Prof. Rucker takes a few quirky grains of modern scientific fact, drops them into the colorful tide pool of his own imagination, and harvests a major swarm of abalones, jellyfish, and giant anemones

Saucer Wisdom by Rudy Rucker. newSpecify the genre of the book on their own. Author: Rudy Rucker. Title: Saucer Wisdom. Send report: This is a good book. 1. Another book cover desperately needed! 4 downloads, last downloaded at March 9, 2016.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. With "Saucer Wisdom" Rucker has reached a new peak. Saucer Wisdom" is absolutely one of the best books of the year. Groove to amind-expanding leap into the future. - Publisher's Weekly. Rucker is able to explain in witty and convincing ways just how most of the technological innovations he proposes would work, and - unusual in futurist narratives - he shows how these various technologies evolve.

Rudy Rucker, author of the Software tetralogy and White Light, possesses a quality that could endanger his cyberpunk credibility: enthusiasm. No sullen antihero, Dr. Rucker is a computer science professor and a devoted family man, but his fiction has kept many a reader up all night with visions of humans uploading their consciousnesses into robots that eventually return the favor. A very good book, for all libraries.

With Saucer Wisdom Rucker has reached a new peak.

SerialExpLain Banned. Posts: 3,450 Threads: 728 Joined: Aug 2006. Notes for SAUCER WISDOM (Rudy Rucker). For Rudy Rucker fans.

After reading Rudy Rucker's Saucer Wisdom, you'll wonder. Rucker's "nonfiction novel" follows the author as he works with a saucer contactee who has bales of information about the future and expects him to make a book out of it. Written straight, it presents the author's vision of future technology as though benevolent aliens were filling him in, though some of the details seem suspiciously similar to his novels. It's brilliantly funny, prescient, and as fully engaging as a coffee-fueled late-night conversation with a slightly manic genius.

Rudolf von Bitter Rucker (/ˈrʌkər/; born March 22, 1946) is an American mathematician, computer scientist, science fiction author, and one of the founders of the cyberpunk literary movement. The author of both fiction and non-fiction, he is best known for the novels in the Ware Tetralogy, the first two of which (Software and Wetware) both won Philip K. Dick Awards.

Brace yourself when you open this book, for it purports to be the about the visions of neat biotechnologies one Frank Shook brings back from future times where he has been taken to by flying saucers, and gives to the writer, Rudy Rucker, who's telling the story. That's an odd way to begin a work of popular science . . . . but amusing.Please heed the warning from the Introduction by Bruce Sterling: "If you are examining Saucer Wisdom imagining that Rudy (or some fictional 'Frank Shook') has been actually logging a lot of on board saucer time, well, you can knock that off right now. Rudy Rucker made up the flying saucer part. There is no actual flying saucer. The saucer is not an interplanetary faster-than-light device. Its what we professional authors like to call a narrative device. "I'm going to spill the beans as directly as I can here: Saucer Wisdom is a work of popular science speculation. Its a nonfiction book in which Prof. Rucker takes a few quirky grains of modern scientific fact, drops them into the colorful tide pool of his own imagination, and harvests a major swarm of abalones, jellyfish, and giant anemones."Pop-science writers didn't used to treat 'science' in this boisterous way, but there might well be a trend here, there may be a real future in this. Saucer Wisdom is a book by a well-qualified mathematician and computer scientist, a veteran pop science writer, in which 'science' is treated, not as some distant and rarefied quest for absolute knowledge, but as naturally great source material for a really long, cool rant."Rucker, in character, describes, and illustrates with delightful cartoon sketches (the way he would use chalk and a blackboard while talking science), the world of the progressively more distant future as it is transformed by computer technology, biotechnology, and human evolution. He also describes a hell of a party in Berkeley. Popular science writing will never be the same.
Reviews: 7
Mushicage
Saucer Wisdom is Rudy Rucker's "nonfiction" book describing the travels of a man he meets after one of his lectures who has been in contact with aliens. Rucker asks the man, Frank Shook, to ask various questions of the aliens--about the future of communications, bioengineering, travel, the nature of time, and transhumanity. The book amounts to a future history of the world according to Rudy Rucker, the elements of which are familiar to anyone who has read Rucker's other books (in particular the Software/Wetware/Freeware/Realware series, and especially the last two).

The "nonfiction" narrative structure makes for a more entertaining book than this would otherwise be--while the future developments Rucker envisions are interesting, without the story it would be more like a series of encyclopedia entries.

The conceit within the book of this book being popular thousands of years in the future is pretty ridiculous--this is not one of Rucker's better works.
Beranyle
As Bruce Sterling says in the forward of this book, the saucer/alien plot and motifs are merely a literary device to help serve up some wildly fascinating conjectures about the future of human technology and development.
As a lover of good science fiction and futurology I usually keep up on the current subjects but this book really put forward some exotic ideas on what it is to be human and whether technology is a friend or foe to our spiritual development. I was pleasantly surprised at one of the theses in this book that, properly used and properly seen, technology is not our foe but is merely one of the means to bring humankind to a higher plane of awareness. There are so many people who spend all their lives accumulating things as if those things are ends in and of themselves. But these people miss the point. If they put their hearts to gaining the right kinds of material things they would see the higher transformative power of those things. In other words, let's say, a car can either be just another toy to help you be a chick magnet or that car can actually be a material thing to convey you on a spiritual journey. These are the ideas that Frank Shook brings back to Rudy (at least some of the underlying messages that were important to me).
Also the musings on our anthropomorphic desires versus the vast possibility of other alien desires in the universe was amusing.
I'm sure people will have many, many other thoughts.
Unfortunately, for me, I have this pretentious need for a book to have a literary execution that's equal to the ideas being presented and "Saucer Wisdom" was a little too lightweight. It felt more like a "snack" book than a main course. It felt too much like easy feel-good physics on the same level as "The Dancing Wu-Li Masters." Real physics is weighted down by those pesky little calculations that indicate some physical process is doable in the universe we live in.
So, in short, some interesting mental gymnastics but the plot felt too cobbled together.
Sermak Light
In trying to treat this as a serious but disguised scientific or mystical text, some people seem, in my view, to have completely missed the point.*
This book is a blast. It's hilarious. Even Buce Sterling's introduction is taking the mickey. From the 'Frank Shook' charcacter and all his bizarre friends and enemies through the eccentric aliens to the whacked-out DMT-fantasy drawings, Saucer Wisdom is one big riff on the insanity of Californian culture with all its weirdness and UFO fixations, its spaced-out hippies and way-too-serious hackers and crackers. It's also a nostalgic but knowingly humorous retrospective on past visions of how the future would be, saturated with that Golden Age of sci-fi nutty predictiveness, the less paranoid days when UFOs came to bring us cosmic messages of love and peace, and when everyone knew that in the future they would have intelligent machines and telepathy and a robot dog for the kids. The humour of Saucer Wisdom is moderated by a humane and tolerant vision of humanity: while Rucker is laughing, he's not patronising. This is not vicious satire, it is a gently self-mocking and whimsical journey.
So forget any 'messages', forget serious sci-fi, just knock-back, drift away, and smile to yourself for a few hours. Lovely.
*At least that's what I thought. If Rudy Rucker really is being serious (which I doubt somehow), then Saucer Wisdom is still funny but for very different reasons!
Narder
This has to be one of the most original science fiction books I have read in a long time. This book snagged me right from the start......and theres even some funny parts.
Grokinos
If you've read Rudy's other works, you should get around to this one. It sat on my shelf for ten years at least before I finally got to it, during which time Rudy cranked out several more novels, in which he spins really fun stories using the technologies that he catalogs in this book. So for me, it's kind of like being a Trekkie and finding a catalog of Enterprise-era technology. It's essentially a cheery book, a merry march toward the endless future of trans-human existence. The biggest obstacles to the book are the marketing. The cover's stupid ugly. Spare parts? Sterling's foreword is weird. Why deflate the premise of the book before the reader gets to it? Neither essential nor thrilling, yet meaningful and enlightening. Memorable for Rudy's frank self-disclosure that attaining permanent sobriety is his greatest wish. Well, he may wish for it, but I'm glad he got lit.