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Download The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds epub book
ISBN:0547003099
Author: Julie Zickefoose
ISBN13: 978-0547003092
Title: The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds
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ePUB size: 1808 kb
FB2 size: 1164 kb
DJVU size: 1304 kb
Language: English
Category: Nature and Ecology
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt; 37853rd edition (March 20, 2012)
Pages: 384

The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds by Julie Zickefoose



The Bluebird Effect is about the change thats set in motion by one single act, such as saving an injured bluebird-or a hummingbird, swift, or phoebe. Each of the twenty five chapters covers a different species, and many depict an individual bird, each with its own personality, habits, and quirks. And each chapter is illustrated with Zickefooses stunning watercolor paintings and drawings. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.

The Bluebird Effect book. Julie Zickefoose lives for the moment when a wild, free living. And finally, C) The uncommon bonds. And this probably goes to the heart of what it is to be a birder. As an avocation, birding is a lifelong passion. A lifetime of garnering information, little clues. You can read all the books, attend classes and workshops but ultimately each birder spends long solitary hours in the field with heightened senses, pulling together the pieces, the sounds, the flashs of color, the awareness of surroundings, the Thoreauvian attentiveness, the sensitivity to the season. As Zickefoose's writes, "Learning about birds, for me, like piecing together a puzzle.

The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds. The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds is about what happens when, by virtue of having helped one or raised one, you are taken for a few magic days, weeks, or months into a wild bird's confidence. Lavishly illustrated with 320 of the author's color paintings, life sketches and drawings, The Bluebird Effect is a visual delight. But what makes The Bluebird Effect such a rare and important book is how Julie provides plenty of examples from her own unusual life of times when birds do reciprocate-the "uncommon bonds" of its title, when birds appeared to repay her passion and concern with, if not love, then with trust and what may even be gratitude.

The Bluebird Effect is about the change that's set in motion by one single act, such as saving an injured bluebird-or a hummingbird, swift, or phoebe. And each chapter is illustrated with Zickefoose's stunning watercolor paintings and drawings

Her reward for the grueling work of rescuing birds such as feeding baby hummingbirds every twenty minutes all day long is her empathy with them and the satisfaction of knowing the world is a birdier and more beautiful place. With Julie Zickefoose's autobiographical The Bluebird Effect, you get all of that, in a volume packed with over 300 thick, glossy pages of the author's stunning bird art wrapped in tale after touching tale of her intimate encounters with birds.

The Bluebird Effect is a collection of 25 essays, each about a single bird (one of them deals with two birds). With a few notable exceptions, these are common, backyard birds. The one thing they all have in common is that they have had a profound influence on the author, mostly through close contact afforded her as a licensed bird rehabilitator. As you can imagine, Zickefoose has some amazing stories. Zickefoose has had the enviable opportunity to really know these birds on an individual basis, including their own quirks and, yes, personality. And what she has discovered is astounding. For instance, on multiple occasions and with different species, she has come to the aid of a bird, such as keeping it safe after flying into a window or protecting its nest from a snake.

Book: The Bluebird Effect. Author: Julie Zickefoose. ISBN13: 9780547003092. Published: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Genres: Science Math Nature Ecology Writing, Science Math Nature Ecology Conservation, Science Math Nature Ecology Birdwatching, Sports Outdoors Field Guides Birds. And each chapter is illustrated with Zickefoose's stunning watercolor paintings and drawings.

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Personal Name: Zickefoose, Julie. Publication, Distribution, et. Boston On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The bluebird effect : uncommon bonds with common birds, Julie Zickefoose.

Julie Zickefoose lives for the moment when a wild, free living bird that she has raised or rehabilitated comes back to visit her; their eyes meet and they share a spark of understanding. Her reward for the grueling work of rescuing birds—such as feeding baby hummingbirds every twenty minutes all day long—is her empathy with them and the satisfaction of knowing the world is a birdier and more beautiful place. The Bluebird Effect is about the change that's set in motion by one single act, such as saving an injured bluebird—or a hummingbird, swift, or phoebe. Each of the twenty five chapters covers a different species, and many depict an individual bird, each with its own personality, habits, and quirks. And each chapter is illustrated with Zickefoose's stunning watercolor paintings and drawings. Not just individual tales about the trials and triumphs of raising birds, The Bluebird Effect mixes humor, natural history, and memoir to give readers an intimate story of a life lived among wild birds.

Reviews: 7
Fararala
I first saw the lovely, careful watercolors of Julie Zickefoose in The Nature Conservancy magazine. They were so accurate and lifelike, I was intrigued. Curious, I Googled her to find out she's written and illustrated quite a few books on birds (Baby Birds (2016), The Bluebird Effect (2012), and Letters from Eden (2006) among them, in addition to being a contributing editor to Bird Watcher's Digest. She lives with her family on an eighty-acre sanctuary in Appalachian Ohio.
If you are faced with a dilemma for what to gift a birdwatching friend, you can't go wrong with any of Julie's books. She's the Barbara Kingsolver of the avian world.
ZEr0
This book is a joy to read. Julie Zickefoose is quite an artist. The book is filled with beautiful watercolors and lively sketches of drawings of birds. How she loves members of the bird family.

Julie begins her book in spring, onto summer, autumn, ending with winter. Different times, different parts of the country. There are different happeningss, different commentaires, different stories about Julie's bird friends. She is a good friend to birds and becomes angry about free roaming dogs and cats that cripple and kill birds. She has much life experience dealing with birds, tells her stories, and is where she wants to be in life.

Ms Zickefoose began her love of birds as a very young child being introduced to a tom turkey at a petting zoo. She never wavered from deciding to base her career on her first love. She is a bird mother, feeds baby birds, sketches and portrays them of different ages and stages of growing, if injured she doctors and nurses them, then sends them back into the wild where they belong. They don't always make it. She grieves, then gets back to work on others who need her help. She is a good writer, very knowledgeable about her subjects, acquainted with birds of all kinds, colors, sizes, shapes.

I have learned so much about birds, how hard it is to take care of them, especially babies that need to be fed constantly and if there are several babies at a time, Whew. But Julie does it all and loves it. When she worked at the Nature Conservancy, she worked with shore birds. It is comical about how she worked to save piping plovers and least terns that nested along the beach. It was hard to keep beach goers from stepping on eggs and frightening these birds with all the human noises, riding vehicles and dogs. How annoyed she became with careless beach goers. She recruited volunteers to help and protect these shore birds.

This lady can draw, she can write, she loves life and nature. The book is a delight, but sad when Julie loses her friends. She gets into the personalities of her birds and feels that when released they come back to visit, Maybe its them, but maybe not. Who knows.

I enjoyed reading Ms. Zickefoose's meeting and bonding with an older redtail hawk,how she liked and admired him even though he kills her birds. It is good to go to a secluded corner of a woods to hear bird calls and songs as Julie does.

In winter Ms Zickefoose writes controversial topics against hunting the ancient sandhill crane plus the innocent mourning doves. She also writes about feeding birds, which in turn, attracts predators and wonders if this is wrong to keep feeders. However, she likes seeing pretty birds coming to feed. She believes wild birds belong in the wild, not as pets. This is something to think about. Her two children are being taught to love and respect birds and all of nature.

This is a great book for birders and for those who love nature
Hono
If you love "bird books," as I do, you're always searching for a work that educates us about the looks and lives of our feathered neighbors while also revealing the tragic but often hopeful relationship the inherently flawed species called homo sapiens has had with them. If you're lucky, the book will be filled with art showing the birds going about their daily business. With Julie Zickefoose's autobiographical The Bluebird Effect, you get all of that, in a beautifully-designed volume packed with over 300 thick, glossy pages of the author's stunning bird art wrapped in tale after touching tale of her intimate encounters with birds. By "tale" I don't mean to suggest that Ms. Zickefoose's fluid writing is fictional or unrealistic, but I do mean that The Bluebird Effect, steeped in natural magic, does have a storybook quality to it. We see the author learning about herself as she learns how to care for a variety of injured birds or orphaned nestlings that come her way. Among her patients are eastern phoebes, ruby-throated hummingbirds, scarlet tanagers, chimney swifts, and orchard orioles, each presenting her with a unique challenge that she surmounts after initial mistakes that ultimately improve her bird rehabbing skills. (Often, the challenge is in recognizing and addressing differences in the personalities of birds of the same species!) Along the way, she struggles with many of the issues which today face birders, conservationists, and humans of numerous other stripes: Is it wise to buy a pet bird without knowing any of the pitfalls to owner and bird alike? Should birds even be pets? How can cat owners be made to understand that allowing these purportedly domesticated felines to roam freely outside results in suffering and gruesome death for birds and other wildlife every day? Is there any justification for the hunting of sandhill cranes? What about mourning doves? Does the ivory-billed woodpecker still exist? Are backyard birders themselves guilty of upsetting the balance of nature by feeding birds that otherwise wouldn't be so numerous? The author handles all of these questions, and more, thoughtfully and honestly.
Vispel
It's a beautiful day when you take possession of something as wonderful as The Bluebird Effect: Uncommon Bonds with Common Birds by Julie Zickefoose. One of our local libraries had jumped the gun and inadvertently released this book to me in hard cover ahead of its publication date, and I fell in love with it. But I wanted in my Kindle app for iPad. When I woke up way too early this morning and wondered about going back to sleep, it came to me that this was the day I could get it for the Kindle. In my rush, I accidentally first sent it to one of my e-ink Kindles, and I don't recommend that, because its illustrations are beautiful and need to be seen in color. On the iPad you can spread to enlarge each of those and get the full effect. If you love birds. you need this book. It's a real charmer. Highly recommended in hard cover or Kindle. I have also tried it on the Kindle Fire where the illustrations show up well, but can't be enlarged as they can on the iPad. It is still worth buying for the Fire.