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Download Lottery Numbers epub book
ISBN:1588518809
Author: Harry Schneider
ISBN13: 978-1588518804
Title: Lottery Numbers
Format: azw docx lrf doc
ePUB size: 1821 kb
FB2 size: 1514 kb
DJVU size: 1955 kb
Language: English
Category: Mathematics
Publisher: AmErica House (September 15, 2001)
Pages: 153

Lottery Numbers by Harry Schneider



by Harry Schneider (Author). ISBN-13: 978-1588518804. Why is ISBN important? ISBN. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.

Lottery Numbers Harry Schneider A truly evocative title for any Lottery Book! Can it be really true that anyone at all can predict future lottery numbers? This book is unlike any other lottery book – it doesn't claim to predict actual numbers but examines different types of numbers and their statistical frequency. These types include onacci/etc. Many other valuable aspects are fully examined and the priceless lessons learned come out as invaluable guidance. Download Lottery Numbers. Read Online Lottery Numbers.

Learn to pick smart lottery numbers by examining numbers and sequences. You could be the next big lottery winner! Of course no one can predict, with certainty, any future group of lottery numbers that are to be drawn. But Winning Lottery Lines can guide you into making sensible, rational choices that will help you select winning lottery lines. Author Harry Schneider undertook a huge, concise project to save you from an enormous amount of time and trouble. He currently lives with his wife in Scotland.

A truly evocative title for any Lottery Book! Can it be really true that anyone at all can predict future lottery numbers? This book is unlike any other lottery book – it doesn't claim to predict actual numbers but examines different types of numbers and their statistical frequency.

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A refreshing read for anyone. Lottery Numbers – Harry Schneider – 2001. Schneider, being a mathematician and programmer, focuses on minimising silly mistakes when choosing number combinations. Schneider has no limit to his knowledge on the mathematical basis of the Lottery. However, the books format is simple and straightforward. Lotto Trouble – Cash Kushel – 2003. Jones has focused this book on how to help novices understand the key concepts of selecting numbers for the lottery. Simple to understand, but with excellent systems discussed also. Take advantage of my UNIQUE method to Win on the Lottery/Lotto – Imdad – 2005.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. Lottery Numbers Past, Present & Future. Lottery Numbers Past, Present & Future A truly evocative title for any Lottery Book Can it be really true that anyone at all can predict future lottery numbers? This book is unlike any other lottery book - it doesn't claim to predict actual numbers but examines different types of numbers and. Specifications. Publishamerica, Publish America.

The Paperback of the Lottery Numbers Past, Present & Future by Harry Schneider at Barnes & Noble ww. hestranger. Articles by Nick Manheim, David A. Perez, and Harry Schneider, The Stranger, Seattle's Only Newspaper books. Jewish year book, 561)5. 11, ; D ; Harold Ingerman,.

453 results for Harry Schneider. 12 Pictures of Harry Schneider. Learn more about Harry Schneider. Harry Schneider, Olivia Schneider, Samuel Schneider and Jody Schneider are prepared for the aquathon. Mike Knott Buchen: Harry Schneider auf Platz Zwei - Ticker - Mannheimer Morgen. 56 Social Network Profiles. Real Estate, Munich Area, Germany. 3 Hobbies & Interests. WATCH: Holocaust Survivor Speaks to Harrison Eighth-Graders. 1 Related Publications.

A truly evocative title for any Lottery Book! Can it be really true that anyone at all can predict future lottery numbers? This book is unlike any other lottery book – it doesn't claim to predict actual numbers but examines different types of numbers and their statistical frequency. These types include odds/evens/prime/Fibonacci/etc. Many other valuable aspects are fully examined and the priceless lessons learned come out as invaluable guidance.
Reviews: 7
Kaim
I was very disappointed in this book. The author analyzes each draw in 1 year's worth of data (52 samples) based on different properties of numbers. For example, in how many of those draws are all numbers even? How many have 5 of the 6 even? How many have 4 of the 6 even? etc. He then creates a histogram of the results and draws conclusions. "Well, gee, in this sample of 52 occurrences (1 year's worth of draws), NONE of them were all even, and only one of them were all odd! That means that you should NEVER choose lottery numbers that are all even or all odd!" He then "confirms" this rule on a different set of 52 draws.

But that is a FALSE conclusion. What the author doesn't tell you is that a sample size of 104 (52 + 52) is TOO SMALL to make these kinds of conclusions when there are 13,983,816 possible combinations. 104 samples (assuming all 104 are unique) represents only 0.0007437 of 1% of all the possible combinations, or about 7 ten thousandths of 1%.

Let's take his rule regarding numbers divisible by 4 (i.e., 4, 8, 12, 16, ... 48). He says, "WHEN CHOOSING A FUTURE LINE OF LOTTERY NUMBERS ENSURE THAT 5 OR 6 OF THEM ARE NOT EXACTLY DIVISIBLE BY 4." (His capitalization) He makes this conclusion after analyzing his 104 samples and finding that none of them had 5 or all 6 of the numbers divisible by 4. What the author doesn't tell you is that there are only 924 combinations with all 6 numbers divisible by 4 -- only .0066076 of 1% of all possible combinations, or less than 7 thousandths of 1%. His sample size is simply too small to "catch" any of these combinations. It's perfectly reasonable (and actually expected) that none of these 924 combinations would appear in a sample size of only 104.

Assuming a fair game, all combinations of 6 numbers are equally probable. What the author has done is:
1. artificially extract some number of the possible combinations based on properties of the numbers (divisible by 2, 3, 4, etc., all prime numbers, all fibonacci numbers...)
2. fail to tell you how few of those combinations there actually are in the set
3. use a sample size too small
4. then conclude "don't choose number sets like these because they don't occur!"

If the author is a statistician as he claims, he is being, at best, disingenuous in concluding that his flawed experiments actually produce valid rules for choosing lottery numbers.
August
Not what I wanted . I ordered lottery dream book combined but that not what I got ! Too hard to get any substance out of it. Would not recommend to anyone
Jay
I didn't care for the book. The book was full of redundant information. This could have been printed on about 5 pages.
Felolv
I found this book to be concise and to the point. Written by a mathematician but in plain, easy to understand English. I read it in one sitting. I was so impressed by the book that I ordered his Lottery software program the following day. It's a smart investment if you're serious about winning the Lottery.
Grokinos
Thank you.
Zolorn
Junk!!!!!!!
Malara
I think the author should start over and use deeper math sure a bell shaped curve is every where threw out the book, but you could use a frequency chart to get the same bell shaped curve. odds and even numbers are looked at still no real help bell shaped cure all threw out what a bunch of wasted math skills . why didn't the author use cryptography to analyize the lottery numbers of see how strong the randomness is or the gap in between draw numbers there's so much you can do i thing the best bet that's better then this book is to buy a TI-89 TITANIUM CALCULATOR and use the number theory program . I think the author is not creating new math or using new thing's besides I think the TI-89 is pass this guy and you call your self a mathematician also NSA could crack the the lottery if they wanted to . He should use odd even numbers prime numbers the gap in between numbers frequency charts number theory on the TI-89 and cryptography and also more math .
I enjoyed this book very much and read it in about 2.5 hours. Written by a programmer-mathematician, I learned how to improve the odds of winning by using a well-tested checklist which helps you reduce & eliminate silly mistakes and redundancies when creating your number sets. I'm using this book as a foundation because I also realize that intuition and developing your own gaming style is also a part of winning, as well as other variables.
And one of the biggest challenges is keeping organized. Simplicity works best. I generally create my draws, check them, fill out a lottery number form, check it, then submit it.
My gaming style, to date, includes numerous ways of generating draws and I've won small pots from working a mathematical approach, using Quick Picks, and following my hunches which led me to picking 4 out 6 numbers once. Besides winning money, playing the lottery is fun if you want to improve your math skills. I don't play more than $2-$4 a week (sometimes less, or on occasions, a bit more). Sometimes I get pools started.