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ISBN:0670805416
Author: John Shore
ISBN13: 978-0670805419
Title: The Sachertorte Algorithm
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ePUB size: 1169 kb
FB2 size: 1303 kb
DJVU size: 1391 kb
Language: English
Category: Mathematics
Publisher: Viking Adult; First Edition edition (April 29, 1985)
Pages: 270

The Sachertorte Algorithm by John Shore



On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book The Sachertorte algorithm and other antidotes to computer anxiety, John Shore.

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He uses his Sachertorte Algorithm to illustrate for the beginner programmer how to best think about and approach programming. only takes up two chapters about two-thirds of the way into the book; he spends the first parts introducing the basic concepts of computer use and application. He makes one insight I found particularly memorable - that the increased use of word processing software and the relative ease of self-publishing and document creation has, in his opinion, resulted in an overall lowering of the quality of intellectual output.

Publication date 1986. Topics Computer literacy, Computers. Publisher New York : Penguin Books. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on December 23, 2011.

For the culinary dummies like me in the audience, Sachertorte is a chocolate cake; not just any chocolate cake, mind you, but one of the most famous of Viennese culinary specialties. The author uses an extended metaphor of following a recipe for baking a Sachertorte to explain how programmers follow algorithms for creating computer software. This is basically a book on computer literacy. One of the author's main objectives in writing the book was to dispel the feelings of intimidation and anxiety that affect many new users.

Published 1986 by Penguin Books in New York. In library, Computers, Computer literacy, Psychological aspects of Computers, Protected DAISY, Psychological aspects. Bibliography: p. -257. Originally published: New York, NY : Viking, 1985.

Release on 1986-0-04, this book has 269 page count that consist of valuable information with lovely reading experience. The book was publish by Penguin Books, it is one of best computers & technology book genre that gave you everything love about reading. You can download The Sachertorte Algorithm book with ISBN 9780140080377.

The Sachertorte Algorithm. Publisher : Penguin Books.

The following book presents the problems (and solutions) that were devised for a series of high-school competitions held from 1977 to 1987 in Slovenia. Problems in Programming: Experience through Practice. Andrej Vitek, Iztok Tvrdy, Robert Reinhardt, Bojan Mohar, Marc Martinec, Tomi Dolenc and Vladimir Batagelj. John Wiley & Sons, 1991. The preface of this book explains that & competitions culminated in the International Computer Science Olympiad, held for the first time in Nova Gorica, Slovenia in 1988, (and since in Münster, Germany, and Varna, Bulgaria)

the sachertorte algorithm john shore book that written by john shore an publish by addison-wesley. this is one of amazing computers & technology book that contains book 269 pages - read in (stanford law) paul brest's "computers and the law" class, "the sachertorte algorithm," by john shore. be old and outdated, but the concepts still hold.

A research scientist at the Naval Research Laboratory offers a witty explanation of computers and computer technology, proceeding from the basics of computer design and computing to matters of complexity and technological moment
Reviews: 2
Gholbirius
I had this book years ago, and it helped me to describe programming to non-programming people, and to write better programs and program documentation. I eventually loaned it to co-worker, later left the company, and never got the book back. That was ok, as it was a very nice person I loaned it to.

The author explains computer programming, in terms of cooking and baking.
For example: When a recipe says to braise, or cream, broil, saute', or chop, dice, or mince, not following the recipe WILL make a difference in the end result. Some things must be done ahead of time and set aside. Others must be done in sequence. And if you don't know how to do some aspect of the recipe, faking it is NOT going to give the right result.

Computer programs are just as step wise, but a lot longer. Instead of a page long, some programs are thousands of instructions long. But every page is correct, or branches to another section and comes back and continues. There are decision trees, akin to "salt to taste", or some other decision choice in food preparation.
Silly Dog
Shore discusses various topics in computer programming and programs ... particularly as pertains to microcomputers. These include program usability, and a cogent explanation as to why it is so difficult to produce usable programs for computer non-experts. Central to this issue is the ever-changing computer market. Way back in the beginning, there were few computers and many computer experts -- on a relative basis. Today, computers are cheap and plentiful, but skilled experts in computing are relatively rare. So necessarily, computers must be programmed differently for today's markets. Usability is key.

Shore explains how to go about doing this with his metaphorical "Sachertorte Algorithm" in which he shows step by step one simple task, that of baking a cake (or torte). In cookery, of course, an algorithm is known simply as a recipe. The ones often seen in cookbooks go something like: "Sift flour, beat eggs, fold in softened butter, mix, bake 30 min. at 400 deg." And this is fine for a professional or experienced baker. But for an amateur? So Shore expands on each step and shows how operations performed in computing can be undertstood in terms of analagous baking operations, and how errors can arise when the algorithm is not adequately thought through, or executed in correct order. He uses his Sachertorte Algorithm to illustrate for the beginner programmer how to best think about and approach programming.

Shore's S.A. only takes up two chapters about two-thirds of the way into the book; he spends the first parts introducing the basic concepts of computer use and application. He makes one insight I found particularly memorable -- that the increased use of word processing software and the relative ease of self-publishing and document creation has, in his opinion, resulted in an overall lowering of the quality of intellectual output. And because Shore works (or worked) as a researcher at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, this is saying something! One might shudder at what he today thinks regarding the current state of intellectual endeavor with the since-then flourishing (?) of the World Wide Web! I certainly am! (shuddering)

Most of the problems with software engineering that Shore describes involve the gigantism of modern programs. No longer is the microcomputer limited 64 kilobytes, and the programs running on it the product of one, or at most two or three, minds. When marketplace expectations demand multi-megabyte reams of code, the efforts of scores or even hundreds of individual programmers must be meshed into a consistent, coherent whole. Shore describes the problems that can arise when these many individual software machines must be fitted together into that working whole -- hidden assumptions, invisible interfaces, and sharing of machine resources are all potential pitfalls.

This book was published back in 1986 and can still serve as a valuable introduction to The Way Things Used To Be, and perhaps still are! Well worth the time.