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ISBN:1859723055
Author: Mo O'Toole
ISBN13: 978-1859723050
Title: Regulation Theory and the British State: The Case of the Urban Development Corporation
Format: lit doc mobi txt
ePUB size: 1198 kb
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Language: English
Category: Earth Sciences
Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (May 28, 1996)
Pages: 244

Regulation Theory and the British State: The Case of the Urban Development Corporation by Mo O'Toole



Library of Congress Control Number: 96083250. International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 1859723055. Personal Name: O'Toole, Mo. Publication, Distribution, et. Aldershot, Hants, England : Brookfield, V. USA. Physical Description: ix, 233 p. : il. maps ;, 23 cm. Bibliography, etc. Note

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Mo OToole wrote Regulation Theory and the British State: The Case of the Urban Development Corporation, which can be purchased at a lower price at ThriftBooks. Regulation Theory and the British State: The Case of the Urban Development Corporation. Publisher: Routledge.

A major weakness in this literature concerns the treatment of the state, and especially the local state. The local state is a key component in these local modes of regulation, and will be implicated in any transition from one mode to another. These issues are examined by looking at the changing nature of urban politics in three British "cities': Sheffield, Bracknell, and Camden in inner London. Each chapter is concerned with a different aspect of the same transformative process.

Urban Bias Theory Another theory related to urban development looks into poverty. Advocates of the theory argue that the physical structure for national development favor the urban area. Developments in the urban area further attract poor groups from the countryside. As a consequence of the distorted hierarchy this group of people becomes the informal sector in cities. This perhaps is also true with the rural-urban relationship.

The authors place the policies and practices of the urban development corporations (UDCs) in the wider sociopolitical context of evolving urban policy; present case studies of eight UDCs; and explore the legacies of the UDCs and the evolving framework for urban policy into the millennium.

Urban planning is a technical and political process concerned with the development and design of land use and the built environment, including air, water, and the infrastructure passing into and out of urban areas, such as transportation, communications, and distribution networks. Urban planning deals with physical layout of human settlements

Regulation Theory is a e type of Marxist economic theory. Regulation in this case does not just mean rules and regulations, it means the self-regulation mechanisms of a system. The economy is not something abstract which happens in isolation, it happens in the context of social, cultural, political and other systems. These systems interact with the economy and make it work. Regulation theory therefore sees the intimate interconnections between the economy and society. The peasantry were too closely regulated, controlled and subjugated by the lords of the manor. Rural life was local, people didn't travel very far. In the towns, however, feudal relationships were weaker and trade could flourish.

This book is an evaluation of the political impact on the Urban Development Corporation and draws on research which was undertaken in three of the UDC areas. It places the UDC within the context of the dramatic transformation in state institutions and processes which have taken place during the last 15 years. It suggests that UDCs are part of an experimental ensemble designed to test new state forms within the context of significant changes to the global accumulation process. It argues that these new state forms are consistent with a departure from the state regulatory framework which has characterised Keynesian state policies in the local government arena throughout the post war period (Fordism) and that the impetus for their creation arises from the crisis in the Keynesian state form. The author suggests that the success of the UDC and in turn different responses according to class and class fraction positions in the locality are mediated principally by the local government framework of the area. The attempt by Thatcherism to create a 'hegemonic' concept of control has therefore been somewhat uneven.