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ISBN:1592283330
Author: Ted Leeson
ISBN13: 978-1592283330
Title: Jerusalem Creek: Fly Fishing through Driftless Country
Format: mbr lrf azw txt
ePUB size: 1890 kb
FB2 size: 1277 kb
DJVU size: 1348 kb
Language: English
Category: Biological Sciences
Publisher: Lyons Press; 1st edition (June 1, 2004)
Pages: 256

Jerusalem Creek: Fly Fishing through Driftless Country by Ted Leeson



Home All Categories Jerusalem Creek: Fly Fishing through Driftless Country. ISBN13: 9781592283330. Jerusalem Creek : Fly Fishing Through Driftless Country. An exploration into the unique landscape of the driftless area of Wisconsin, some ten thousand square miles of beautiful trout country.

Every existence has its pulse points," writes Ted Leeson in this latest book, "those places where life rises somehow closer to the surface and makes itself more keenly felt. Spring creeks have been mine. Jerusalem Creek is an exploration into the unique landscape of the "driftless area" in southwest Wisconsin, "a geography of small concealments"-of coves and hollows, oak groves and shady bends, winding brooks and trout

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Jerusalem Creek is an exploration into the unique landscape of the "driftless area" insouthwest Wisconsin, "a geography of small concealments"-of coves and hollows, oak groves andshady bends, winding brooks and trout. It is not a landscape that you hike up, or climb down into, orstand out looking upon; it is one that you slip inside of," and this book presents the view from within. Leeson reflects on waters and people, and the experiences and ideas that shaped his understandingof spring creek country.

Ted Leeson is the author of Jerusalem Creek: Fly Fishing Through Driftless Country (The Lyons Press, 2004, 256 pages), The Fly Tier’s Benchside Reference (with Jim Schollmeyer; Frank Amato Publications, 1998, 444 pages), and Tying Emergers: A Complete Guide (with Jim Schollmeyer; Frank Amato Publications, 2004, 260 pages) and numerous magazine articles. He teaches English at Oregon State University and lives in Corvallis, Oregon. Patterns of Behavior". I SUSPECT THAT FISHERMEN have always held strong and sometimes complicated opinions about their flies.

Spring creeks have been mine. Jerusalem Creek is an exploration into the unique landscape of the "driftless area" in southwest Wisconsin, "a geography of small concealments"-of coves and hollows, oak groves and shady bends, winding brooks and trout. It is not a landscape that you hike up, or climb down into, or stand out looking upon; it is one that you slip inside of," and this book presents the view from within. Leeson reflects on waters and people, and the experiences and ideas that shaped his understanding of spring creek country.

In his latest book, Ted Leeson presents an exploration into the unique landscape of the 'driftless area of Wisconsin. Ted Leeson captured the experience of fishing the intimate spring creeks of Wisconsin's Driftless area. Once an active fisher of Wisconsin's spring creeks, I know rarely get to return. Their magic isn't in large fish or even pastoral setting though both certainly do exist. I think the author wonderfully explains how these creeks glory is in their intimacy. They feel "cozy" yet are never necessarily the same. I think the story should appeal to people who've never fished the spring. Download Free Books Downloader.

Jerusalem Creek: Journeys into Driftless Country, Lyons (New York, NY), 2002. SIDELIGHTS: The growing popularity of sport fishing in the United States has given rise to several books by Ted Leeson, an instructor at Oregon State University

Every existence has its pulse points," writes Ted Leeson in this latest book, "those places where life rises somehow closer to the surface and makes itself more keenly felt. Spring creeks have been mine." Jerusalem Creek is an exploration into the unique landscape of the "driftless area" in southwest Wisconsin, "a geography of small concealments"-of coves and hollows, oak groves and shady bends, winding brooks and trout. "It is not a landscape that you hike up, or climb down into, or stand out looking upon; it is one that you slip inside of," and this book presents the view from within. Leeson reflects on waters and people, and the experiences and ideas that shaped his understanding of spring creek country. By turns thoughtful and hilarious, passionate and wry, he journeys into the special charms of small-scale waters and pastoral spaces; the nature of meandering trout streams and fishermen; ruminations on dairy cows, honeybees, and the midwestern character; family and angling companions; Amish farmsteads; the memory of a missing photograph; the equivocal dream of owning a trout stream; the ways in which the past endures in the present. Layered and overlapping, like the limestone geology of driftless country, the meditations in this book cumulatively tell the story of how we create the places we love, and how they in turn create us. Jerusalem Creek is a wise, poignant, and haunting book about those places that remain with us long after we've left them.
Reviews: 7
Kamick
Ted Leeson seems to have spent most of his life coaxing trout out of forested pools of water. From his current home on the west coast, he thinks back to his youth and the spring creeks he and friends used to fish in southwestern Wisconsin. That small region is called "driftless" in geological terms; it's the only part of the state that escaped the flow of the last glacier and thus has more rolling hills and valleys than the rest of the central and upper Midwest. Leeson's reminiscences are supplemented with casual factual information about glacial and nonglacial geology, the science of meandering water, the differences between freestone rivers and spring creeks, the known history of fly-fishing, the Amish methods of sustainable agriculture, and concerns about private ownership of waterways. Interjected bits of natural wisdom provide food for thought: "It is no coincidence that the salinity of blood and seawater are the same." Now there's a nugget to throw to the next person you see.
Throughout the book's journey, we remember along with him, back to youthful days and times spent with good friends. While the author admits he might not be much of a fisherman -- his first attempt at casting practice in his backyard snagged a small boy from the neighborhood -- he's good at sharing his memories and life observations with us. He paints scenes with words to give us landscapes based in text, not oils. Jerusalem Creek and Emerald Creek (sobriquets to protect their real identities) contained "trout of the usual two varieties: the kind we could catch, which were scarce, and the kind we could not, which were abundant." Stream-side attacks by territorial red-winged blackbirds were not uncommon. Now living in Oregon, this displaced Cheesehead still waxes poetic about his homeland: "[T]hough the state may not be precisely in the middle of the country, the human heart too is somewhat north and east of center."
One gets the distinct impression that Leeson wrote this book as a tribute to a brother now gone. Though the topic is not fully addressed, there are hints at loss and at having "a hole in your heart." And that's OK, the way it reads. If he relayed his personal history to us over a few cold ones in a nearby tavern, we'd probably be polite enough not to ask the direct questions. But we'd always wonder what really happened. And here the reader is also kept wondering.
When Leeson and his comrades return as adults to fish in Jerusalem Creek, the memories and realities come full circle. They see that while things are not quite the same, it is not necessarily the place that is different.
Beranyle
This book, along with Mr Leeson's The Habit of Rivers, is among the best fly fishing literature of our epoch. As pointed out by another reviewer, this is not a book about "slaying lumkers" or "hot spots" and will indeed be a disappointment to some of our hook and bullet brethren. (Corinne Smith's review above, howvere, is spot-on and I wont repeat the sentiments here). Mr Leeson's subject is man "figuring himself out and his place in the world" (my words)seen through WI Spring Creeks. Leeson is highly intelligent and writes exceedingly well. I would place this work with other by Datus Proper, Frank Mele, Sparse Gray Hackle, Bill Barich, Russell Chatham - ie, the best and most refined in our sporting world. Highly recommended but will disapoint the committed meat fisherman...........
Irostamore
Ted Leeson captured the experience of fishing the intimate spring creeks of Wisconsin's Driftless area. I like to think I share more than a few parallels with the author's experience. Once an active fisher of Wisconsin's spring creeks, I know rarely get to return. Their magic isn't in large fish or even pastoral setting though both certainly do exist. I think the author wonderfully explains how these creeks glory is in their intimacy. They feel "cozy" yet are never necessarily the same.
I think the story should appeal to people who've never fished the spring creeks of WI but just enjoy a wonderfully told story about a kid growing up fishing familiar streams whose now long removed from those streams but the streams never leave your memories.
Morlunn
Leeson is a great writer and interesting
Reighbyra
A great book, thick, deep and a rather slow read but well worth your time.
Nirad
Always will be one of the best pure writers in the area of fly fishing. Very sophisticated stuff.
Burking
This book was not what I expected. It is not a light-hearted read. It is very deep, heavy on geology, natural history, and philosophy. The author has a very collegial voice and has a vocabulary to go along with it. I am college educated, but I ran across many words and technical terms having nothing to do with fishing whose meaning I was uncertain. The parts of the book that described fishing experiences were enjoyable, otherwise there was a great deal of information I could not relate to. It's not a bad book, and I am glad to have read it, but it just wasn't what I was expecting.
The book is a slow read, very literate and at times monotonous. This book isn't really about trout or flyfishing, but more about the author's philosophical view of the environment surrounding the driftless area. This book reads like it was written by a philosophy professor instead of a fisherman. This book was not what I was expecting.