Download Captive Universe epub book
ISBN:0586056777
Author: Harry Harrison
ISBN13: 978-0586056776
Title: Captive Universe
Format: txt lrf lrf lit
ePUB size: 1317 kb
FB2 size: 1831 kb
DJVU size: 1501 kb
Language: English
Category: Science Fiction
Publisher: HarperCollins Distribution Services; New edition edition (1983)

Captive Universe by Harry Harrison



Captive Universe book. For the first fifty pages you'll swear that Harrison has been rummaging in an old trunk. the lost community of Aztecs who have been cut off in a hidden valley by a landslide centuries ago. Presently they will discover the outside world-our world. Of course, a "For the first fifty pages you'll swear that Harrison has been rummaging in an old trunk

Harry Harrison - Captive Universe. Harry Harrison - Captive Universe.

Captive Universe is a science fiction novel by American author Harry Harrison, which was first published in 1969. Chimal is a young Aztec tribesman living in an isolated valley which was sealed off from the rest of the world in ages past by a massive earthquake. Unlike the rest of his people, who are content with the way things are, he shows more interest in what lies outside the valley, and in asking questions that no one can answer.

A young man in a primitive valley, terrorized by despotic rulers, cruelty, superstition and by very real monsters of awesome power sets off on a quest for freedom. When he reaches the world outside his valley, however, he makes an astonishing discovery, at once terrible and wonderful, about the nature of his entire world! Captive Universe. They did not remember the law and did not agree with me and they had to look it up in the book which took a long tune - and when they did they found I was right and they were wrong. It was not a boy’s smile at all.

A berkley medallion book. published by BERKLEY PUBLISHING CORPORATION. Published by arrangement with the author's agent. All rights reserved which includes the right to reproduce this book or portions thereof in any form whatsoever. For information address. Robert P. Mills, Ltd. 156 East 52nd Street.

Harrison, Harry - Captive Universe. To the templ. Bring the one in," Citlallatonac's voice spoke from the temple, and they pushed him inside Harry Harrison - Captive Universe. Harrison, Harry - Captive Universe. Harrison, Harry - Captive Universe (v. ).

Author: Harry Harrison. Publisher: Berkley, 1969. A young man in a primitive valley, terrorized by despotic rulers, cruelty, superstition and by very real monsters of awesome power sets off on a quest for freedom. When he reaches the world outside his valley, however, he makes an astonishing discovery, at once terrible and wonderful, about the nature of his entire world! Contents.

O nen nontlacat O nen nonqizaco ye nican in tlalticpac: Ninotolinia, in manel nonquiz, in manel nontlacat. ye nican in tlalticpac.

Captive Universe" from 1969 is a fairly good read. The plot involves a man who lived in an Aztec village which is cut off from the rest of the world, by mountains. He goes on an adventure of exploration and finds out that his world, is nothing like he thought it was. If you like the 1980 book, "The World and Thorinn" by Damon Knight. or Heinlein's "Orphans of the Sky" you will probably like "Captive Universe. Positives: Interesting concept of what appears to be ending up as something totally different. Among the musty paperbacks was this book, "Captive Universe," by Harry Harrison. Previously the only other Harrison book I had read was his "Make Room! Make Room!" which became the movie "Soylent Green. Anyway, I was expecting that, you know, pulp fiction "B Novel"experience, but as the pages turned, I realized that here was book of more depth and intelligence, and masterfully crafted.

Harry Harrison "Captive Universe". Malzeme işlemden geçiyor, lütfen daha sonra tekrar dene.

Reviews: 7
Madi
"Captive Universe" from 1969 is a fairly good read. The plot involves a man who lived in an Aztec village which is cut off from the rest of the world, by mountains. He goes on an adventure of exploration and finds out that his world, is nothing like he thought it was. If you like the 1980 book, "The World and Thorinn" by Damon Knight. or Heinlein's "Orphans of the Sky" you will probably like "Captive Universe."

Positives:
Interesting concept of what appears to be ending up as something totally different.
Fairly good character development.
Good world building, with two distinct societies.

Negatives:
A lot of Aztec words which are sometimes explained, but other times are not.
Confusing names that sound very similar.
Not a real conclusion

Overall, for the genre of generational colony ships, this book is a fair read. My grade, B-
*Nameless*
I originally read this book over 20 years ago while I was in high school. Despite the time that has passed and the thousands of books I have read since then, I still remembered the plot and memorable elements from this book. I recently found it again on Amazon.com although I had to purchase it used since it was out of print. Needless to say I very much enjoyed rereading it.
Although written as an exciting sci-fi adventure, the book examines in the role of religion, intelligence and culture in regulating human life. The book follows a life of Chimal a boy born a genius amongst a civilization of below average intelligence Aztecs. The boy continually questions the cultural traditions and sometimes barbaric religious rules that his village has followed without question for hundreds of years. To his elevated intelligence some of those rules make no sense at all.
Needless to say his questioning gets him into trouble and on a series of adventures which reveal the true nature of the world in which he lives.
I find great parallels between Chimal's situation and those in the world today. Entire populations are being led by the teachings of religions. Many follow blindly while others question, some in secret in fear of their life. How many of us really know the reality of the world and universe out there.
Doomblade
It's hard to say too much about this book without giving away the story! But, I will say that this story was short and completely believable. It was impossible to put down. Very little of it seemed dated in the least, almost 50 years after it was written.
Cktiell
I read this book a few years ago and enjoyed the premise of a race of genetically engineered primitives inhabiting the hollowed out interior of an asteroid on a multigenerational voyage to another star. The primitives are divided into two races who must not interbreed until the star is nearly reached at which point the interbreeding allows them to regain normal human intelligence. But, as you might expect, one couple pairs off resulting in the birth of a prematurely intelligent man who then has enough wit to discover the full story of this remarkable space craft.

Having read the paragraph above, you now know just about all there is to know about the novel. At least that was the experience of my daughter who also read this book after my explanations of it. "Dad, after you explained it to me, I thought the book would have a lot more to it, but basically there wasn't much more there." Sigh. And that's the flaw of this book and also the flaw of most Sci Fi. Interesting ideas to spark pondering. But the books themselves tend to be threadbare when it comes to characterization, motivation, and insight.
Dordred
ok
Brightfury
Back in the day I loved sci fi and read many authors of the 50s and 60s. I didn't remember anything by Henry Harrison and decided to relive my youth by trying out this novel. A mistake. It was ghastly; simplistic, shallow, superficial. I chucked it about half way through.
Zinnthi
A used book store was having a sale, offering all the paperbacks you could stuff into a plastic grocery bag for 25 cents. I loaded up my bag, plunked down a quarter, and went home to sift through my haul.

Among the musty paperbacks was this book, "Captive Universe," by Harry Harrison. Previously the only other Harrison book I had read was his "Make Room! Make Room!" which became the movie "Soylent Green." Anyway, I was expecting that, you know, pulp fiction "B Novel"experience, but as the pages turned, I realized that here was book of more depth and intelligence, and masterfully crafted.

I can't give away a primary element of the book and thus spoil the premise, but it involves a troubled young Aztec boy, Chimal, who is aliented from his society. He has the terrible feeling something is wrong with life in the ancient Aztec world. Yes, it's ruled be despotic rulers, there are monsters and superstition, but something more insidious is amiss. Our hero attempts an escape from his valley to find answers and a better life -- and what he finds is mind boggling.

When Chimal uncovers the truth, well, what we have is just amazing science fiction fun.

I wish more of today's books were tightly written like this compact novel. My old paperback is 160 pages of tiny print. It's a 1969 copyright edition issued by Berkley Publishing. It seems that today's publishers are trying to sell books by the pound. They think that if a person is going to cough up $9 for a paperback, they want something with 700 pages, with some heft to it. But the result is a lot of egregiously overwritten books filled with dead weight print, pages that one can skim and still pick up enough of the flow to get through the book. But the penalty is flabby books that are bulky, without punch and over written.

Do youself a favor and get a copy of "Captive Universe" for a short, punchy science fiction experience like it was meant to be -- a gift from the Golden Age of science fiction. "Captive Universe" is an obscure diamond waiting for you to enjoy its sparkle.