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ISBN:0737302712
Author: James Frenkel
ISBN13: 978-0737302714
Title: Bangs and Whimpers: Stories About the End of the World (Roxbury Park Books)
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ePUB size: 1700 kb
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Language: English
Category: Science Fiction
Publisher: Roxbury Park; First Printing edition (October 1, 1999)
Pages: 219

Bangs and Whimpers: Stories About the End of the World (Roxbury Park Books) by James Frenkel



Presents a collection of stories exploring the end of the world from authors such as Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke. Arthur C Clarke's 1951 "The Nine Billion Names of God" is a haunting tale of what happens when technology gets involved with the metaphysics of religion. Isaac Azimov's 1956 "The Last Question" goes to the other side of the coin and asked what happens when technology becomes a religion

Manufacturer: Lowell House Release date: 1 October 1999 ISBN-10 : 0737302712 ISBN-13: 9780737302714. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Publication, Distribution, et. . Roxbury Park ; Lincolnwood, Il.Lowell House, (c)1999. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

Bangs and Whimpers delivers on all fronts. Every time I've started to tell someone about this book, intending to tell them about just one short story in particular I think they would find of interest, I find myself saying something like, "Oh, yeah, and there was this other one that explored an end-of-the-world scenario where we planted the seeds to a new creation b. This book is amazing. Each short story approached the Ending of All Things from a different vantage point and perception. A collection of short stories from 19 luminaries of the science fiction world. Each story explores the end of the world, or of humanity, and they are in turns funny or tragic, mostly concerning the reaction the characters have to realizing what's happening. Maybe it's my general apathy towards short stories, but I found the group of very mixed success, although there are a few winners here.

Bangs & Whimpers book. I started it several nights ago, longing for the feel of a paper book in my hands after nearly a year This book, Bangs & Whimpers: Stories About the End of the World is a collection of short stories by different authors. Most of these stories were written some fifty to sixty years ago. It includes passages from all the greats - from Arthur C. Clarke to Robert Heinlein, Neil Gaiman to Isaac Asimov.

Publisher: Lowell House/ Roxbury Park Books. This is an anthology of some of the best apocalyptic short stories, by the best authors around. If "the end of the world (as we know it)" is your bag, you'll certainly want to read this on. eginning with Arthur C. Clarke (The Nine Billion Names of God) and ending with Isaac Asimov (The Last question), all the great ones are here-yes, Heinlein, too (The Year of the Jackpot). Even James Thurber (Interview With a Lemming.

About book: The Bangs & Whimpers by tons of authors such as Isaac Asinov, Arthur C. Clarke, Phillip K. Dick, Neil Gaiman,Robert A. Heinlein, Frederik Punt, Robert Silverberg, James Thurber, James Tiptree Jr, and Connie Willis is kind of weird book honestly. It is a book with all kind of different short stories by different authors describing or predicting how the world would end and who would be alive to tell the horror story. It was written in 1999

Publisher: Roxbury Park, Lowell House. 139, Emissary from a Green and Yellow World, (1998), short story by Robert Sheckley. 149, The Portable Phonograph, (1941), short story by Walter Van Tilburg Clark. 157, Fermi and Frost, (1985), short story by Frederik Pohl.

Maybe you answer can be Bangs & Whimpers: Stories about the End of the World (Roxbury Park Books) why because the great cover that make you consider about the content will not disappoint an individual. The inside or content is fantastic as the outside as well as cover. That reserve can make you to feel relax. This kind of book Bangs & Whimpers: Stories about the End of the World (Roxbury Park Books) was colorful and of course has pictures on there.

October 1999 : USA Paperback

Presents a collection of stories exploring the end of the world from authors such as Isaac Asimov, Arthur C. Clarke, Howard Fast, and Robert A. Heinlein
Reviews: 5
Galanjov
This book was a magical find, first of all because it is so hard to get your hands on a copy and second because there are so many shorts from the All Time Masters of Sci-Fi. Plus, who doesnt love a good old end of the world story? Great midnight reading!
The Nine Billion Names of God by Arthur C. Clarke - What if someone really discovered the key to the end of the world and how to unlock it?
Killing the Morrow by Robert Reed - bizarre family tale of strangers forced together to nurture delivered embryos in their bathtubs.
You Can Get Them Wholesale by Neil Gaimen - be careful what you ask for...
Fire Catcher by Richard Kadrey - Whose finger is really on the button?
Not with a Bang by Howard Fast - What if you knew for a fact the sun would never rise again?
Lost and Found by Connie Willis - bizarre twist on the search for the Holy Grail
The Wind and the Rain by Robert Silverberg - Long after pollution suffocates and kills off earth, people from other planets will take tours of the destruction left behind.
The Year of the Jackpot by Robert A Heinlein - Potiphar Breen has been studying the cycles of the earth, not the seasons but more the human lemming cycles as the earth strives to cleanse itself. Can you plot against the end of the world? Will you be able to escape it or hide from it?
Expendable by Philip K. Dick - If insects could talk and you could hear them, would you really want to know what their plots were?
Finis by Frank L. Pollack - A new sun is born and its warming light reaches the earth. Is it too warm?
A Guide to Virtual Death by J.G. Ballard - Futuristic TV Guide
Emissary from a Green and Yellow World by Robert Sheckley - If another race from another planet really did want to help us earthlings out, would we believe them?
The Portable Phonograph by Walter Van Tilburg Clark - When the only comfort left is doled out from a battery operated phonograph.
Fermi and Frost by Frederik Pohl - As the bombs fall a prestigious doctor is offered a seat on an escape flight, and takes a sick, orphaned young boy with him.
Ultimate Construction by C.C. Shackleton - Who will the last man on earth be?
The Manhattan Phone Book (Abridged) by John Varley - Were you in New York City when the bombs fell?
The Man Who Walked Home by James Tiptree, Jr. - An accident at a Particle Acceleration Facility causes a man to start walking home, but in what dimension does he walk and how long will it really take him?
Interview With A Lemming by James Thurber - What would these furry creatures have to say?
The Last Question by Isaac Asimov - Can entropy be reversed? Mans best computer evolves as it contemplates this question for over 100 billion years.
blac wolf
These stories of the apocalypse or resulting dystopia that occur from either man-made or naturally occurring phenomena are drawn from across the twentieth century. From Frank L Pollack's 1906 "Finis" (which is considered to be one of the classics of short stories in any genre) to Robert Sheckley's 1998 "Emissary from a Green and Yellow World" we are treated to a plethora of ways to destroy a world.

My two favorites just happen to be the first and last tales in the book. Arthur C Clarke's 1951 "The Nine Billion Names of God" is a haunting tale of what happens when technology gets involved with the metaphysics of religion. Isaac Azimov's 1956 "The Last Question" goes to the other side of the coin and asked what happens when technology becomes a religion.

In between there are stories about little people visiting from other planets, super-bugs, atomic wars and their aftermaths and other stupidities that man perpetrates on their fellow man. Some are funny and others are silly (when compared to the current technology and situation in the world) but they are all interesting.

Zeb Kantrowitz
nadness
This is an anthology of some of the best apocalyptic short stories, by the best authors around. If "the end of the world (as we know it)" is your bag, you'll certainly want to read this one.

Beginning with Arthur C. Clarke (The Nine Billion Names of God) and ending with Isaac Asimov (The Last question), all the great ones are here--yes, Heinlein, too (The Year of the Jackpot). Even James Thurber (Interview With a Lemming.)

Nineteen of the best apolcalyptic short stories ever to appear in print.

Of course I recommend it.

Joseph Pierre
Fordg
I was amazed at the quality of writing in this book. Each story was as brilliantly constructed as anything Hemingway, Roth, or Faulkner has done. And, since I review over 200 books a year for various publications, that, I think, says a lot. I especially liked this collection because the theme, shall we say, is timeless, and to see 50 years of perspectives on what our problems are and the potential solutions we have is somwhat sobering though enlightening. A must read for any fiction short story lover.
Tuliancel
At turns funny, sad, triumphant, poignant and everywhere in between, this anthology is probably the best I've ever read. Just great stuff.
Highlights are Nine Billion Names of God, Manhattan Phone Book (abridged) and We Can Get Them For You Wholesale.