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ISBN:0722147457
Author: Lin Carter,L. Sprague de Camp
ISBN13: 978-0722147450
Title: Conan the Buccaneer
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ePUB size: 1785 kb
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Language: English
Category: Science Fiction
Publisher: Time Warner Books UK; paperback / softback edition (June 25, 1987)

Conan the Buccaneer by Lin Carter,L. Sprague de Camp



Conan The. Buccaneer. Prologue: DREAM OF BLOOD Two hours before midnight, the princess Chabela awoke. Drawing the filmy coverlet about her naked body, the buxom daughter of King Ferdrugo of Zingara lay tense and trembling. Conan had made sure of this when he had formed his appointment with Ninus, for he did not wish news of the treasure chart to pass current among the crew until he was ready to tell them himself. It is thought that there are but three copies of the book in existence: one in a crypt beneath the royal library of Aquilonia, in Tarantia; one in a secret temple in Vendhya; and the third here. The Stygian tapped the chart with his fingernail. Zarono asked: "Why, if this damned book is so precious, has none taken it yet from the Nameless Isle?"

Conan Saga 06 - Conan the Buccaneer - L Sprague de Camp (odt)/06 - Conan The Buccaneer. Two hours before midnight, the princess Chabela awoke.

I rather enjoyed Conan the Buccaneer, though it isn't a standout. And, it does fill in Zaronos' background. This book is written solely by Carter and de Camp and it shows in its style, treatment of Conan (he is way too tame or besotted, or even inept at times), and also in the rather lackluster, almost mechanic details that describe mysterious places, creatures, and practices. Robert Howard's style is vivid with action and energy, with fantasy and suspense, while de Camp and Carter create a predictable and fairly subdued adventure tale with less than half the usual vigor we find in RHE's stories and novellas.

Camp Lyon Sprague De, Carter Lin, Howard Robert E. Скачать (epub, 186 Kb).

by L. Sprague de Camp and Lin Carter. The hunt for a beautiful princess and a king's treasure bring Conan to the edge of the world, where he must battle the hell-fed powers of the sorcerer Thoth-Ammon.

Conan the Barbarian is a 1982 fantasy novel written by L. Sprague de Camp, Lin Carter and Catherine Crook de Camp featuring Robert E. Howard's seminal sword and sorcery hero Conan the Barbarian, a novelization of the feature film of the same name. It was first published in paperback by Bantam Books in May 1982.

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Moreover, my colleagues Lin Carter and Bjorn Nyberg and I have collaborated on several Conan pastiches, based upon hints in Howard's notes and letters. The Conan stories are laid in Howard's fictional Hyborian Age, about twelve thousand years ago between the sinking of Atlantis and the beginnings of recorded history. Following the events of the story The Snout in the Dark, Conan, dissatisfied with his accomplishments in the black countries, wanders northward across the deserts of Stygia to the meadowlands of Shem.

Conan the Buccaneer, by L. Sprague de Camp and Lin Carter is the sixth book in the Ace series by de Camp and Carter (and that Howard fello. In William Galen Gray’s chronology it is the seventy-fifth Conan tale, following Robert E. Howard’s The Pool of the Black One and taking place before Howard’s Red Nails. When I read one of these books from the De Camp/Carter corpus, I try to remember that these were unusual

Reviews: 7
Fohuginn
Weeeellll, Lin, it ain't so. What you need is strong characterization, great action sequences, strong plotting, more great action sequences, and believable people who aren't anti-heroes/anti-villains/wimps. Great writing means keeping faith with the readers. It also means not boring them to death (Yawn!). Try really examining Howard's writing. Note the consistency of his story flow, characters, plots, action sequences, world-view, emotional constancy, spareness with words, and powerful feel. Cut and cut and cut excess verbiage. Write clean, mean, and lean! Meanwhile, just don't attempt to ape the writing of your betters. Stick to emulating tripe instead. Tripe is what you're best at. Moooooo!!!!!
Yahm
Nope. Patently poor, boring copycats Carter and De Camp, the de-facto trustees of the Howard literary estate, with none of the page-turning, authentic Conan adventures one would expect of the TRUE author of Conan the Cimmerian: Robert E. Howard! This book was just lifeless and mediocre, I'm sorry to say, because it seems that Carter and De Camp both admired Howard....either that or they were milking the estate for all it's worth. Read Conan the Adventurer instead, most of which is vintage Howard.
thrust
Excellent!!!!! There is nothing else to say. Great adventure story of the greatest barbarian to journey through the fantasy world.
Nilabor
What can you say, its Conan
Wal
A replacement that was falling apart
Bearus
Typical of Sprague DeCamp novels, well written, and actually fairly well researched. Very enjoyable.
Anaginn
Not written by Howard, this novel was done by Carter and de Camp to fill in the story somewhat. Conan is in his late thirties and the captain of a Zingaran privateer. The story involves a long sea voyage to a nameless Isle, and Thoth Amon is reintroduced as a villain to bear watching in future tales. I enjoyed reading it when I was a child, though I admit it was not one of those that kept me coming back for rereads. Still worth a look for Conan and Hyborean Age fans.
Conan the Buccaneer, by L. Sprague de Camp and Lin Carter is the sixth book in the Ace series by de Camp and Carter (and that Howard fellow...). In William Galen Gray's chronology it is the seventy-fifth Conan tale, following Robert E. Howard's The Pool of the Black One and taking place before Howard's Red Nails.

When I read one of these books from the De Camp/Carter corpus, I try to remember that these were unusual. The glut of pastiches available to us today weren't written yet. Fans of Conan only had Robert E. Howard's original tales. The sword-swinging Cimmerian wasn't yet quite the fantasy icon he is today (now THAT is understatement). So they were doing something new. The library of Conan tales was small and they were plowing relatively virgin soil.

Interestingly enough, he's not a pirate this time out, and his buccaneering activities as a privateer for King Ferdrugo don't really come into play much, except that he has a ready crew and ship available (which is certainly handy).

A nice aspect is the inclusion of Zarono and Thoth Amon, characters from Howard's tales. Also, Sigurd and Juma are characters that appear in other de Camp and Carter stories. Bearing in mind that there weren't very many Conan tales and the now prolific cast of characters, this was a treat to the fan.

On the Conan sex scale, this one is pretty modest. He becomes the love slave of an amazon queen (yes, seriously), but that's about it.

What we do have is the standard quest for treasure and a damsel in distress. Basically, it's a chase book. Conan chases a boat. Then he is chased. Then he chases it some more. Then he chases somebody else. There's also a hurried voyage that is sort of a `chase after the fact.' If you like Conan hurrying to and fro, you've got it here. Combat-wise, I'd say, for 90% of the book, it's got the lowest body count of any novel-length tales in the entire saga. Possibly so even after the climax.

I rather enjoyed Conan the Buccaneer, though it isn't a standout. Perhaps because it reflects a time before a relentless publishing schedule buried us in plot-thin Conan books (my last review was Conan the Indomitable: ugh). And, it does fill in Zaronos' background. The fallen count is key player in Howard's The Black Stranger, which was renamed (for the better)The Treasure of Tranicos by Carter/de Camp.

This one is definitely worth a read, but it doesn't quite feel `weighty' enough; though that certainly does not make it unique in that regard among stories of the muscle bound barbar.