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ISBN:0765327546
Author: Elizabeth Bear
ISBN13: 978-0765327543
Title: Range of Ghosts (The Eternal Sky)
Format: rtf mobi mbr doc
ePUB size: 1691 kb
FB2 size: 1882 kb
DJVU size: 1927 kb
Language: English
Category: Fantasy
Publisher: Tor Books; 1 edition (March 27, 2012)
Pages: 336

Range of Ghosts (The Eternal Sky) by Elizabeth Bear



Range of Ghosts book. I liked the two main characters very much, the writing was smooth as silk, and probably most importantly, I loved the depth of the mythology. I have a soft spot in my heart for stories within stories, and I have nothing but good things to say about Eternal Night and the Carrion King. The mythology works both as a gorgeous backdrop to the action as well as an excellent world-building tool

Only 20 left in stock (more on the way). Book Riot's List of 50 Best Epic Fantasy Series, Eternal Sky trilogy.

As the sun lowered in the sky and the cold came on, blood froze across his knuckles. He stumbled between bodies still. He would go south, away from the grasslands, perhaps even through the mountains called the Range of Ghosts to the Celadon Highway city of Qeshqer. Qeshqer had been a Rasan city before Temur’s grandfather Temusan conquered it.

In a world where wizards are unable to procreate, Temur, heir to his empire’s throne, flees to avoid assassination info. txt . 9 KBs. Range of Ghosts (Unabridged). jpg 4. 3 KBs. Range of Ghosts The Eternal Sky, Book 1 (Unabridged).

Categories: Science Fiction & Fantasy, Fantasy, Epic. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Eternal Sky 02 - Shattered Pillars.

Range of Ghosts is the opening novel of the Eternal Sky Trilogy. This is a work that blends together different fantasy elements, with traditional epic fantasy stylings such as political intrigue and war mixing with both the historical fantasy of Guy Gavriel Kay and moments of offbeat strangeness that recalls the New Weird (though this is the least of the three influences). The world the book takes place in is reminiscent of our own Central Asia during the Middle Ages, with lands in the book serving as analogues of the Mongol Empire, India, China and Russia. These aren't quite one-for-one. The already-delivered third book, Steles of the Sky, will follow in early 2014. Posted by Adam Whitehead at 16:00.

eBook Description: Temur, grandson of the Great Khan, is walking away from a battlefield where he was left for dead. All around lie the fallen armies of his cousin and his brother, who made war to rule the Khaganate. Temur is now the legitimate heir by blood to his grandfather's throne, but he is not the strongest. Going into exile is the only way to survive his ruthless cousin. Once-Princess Samarkar is climbing the thousand steps of the Citadel of the Wizards of Tsarepheth. She was heir to the Rasan Empire until her father got a son on a new wife

Range of Ghosts (Eternal Sky Temur, grandson of the Great Khan, is walking away from a battlefield where he was left for dead. Temur is now the legitimate heir by blood to his grandfather’s throne, but he is not the strongest. How does this author manage to do this to me every time? What a magnificent fantasy read Range of Ghosts turned out to be for me! I read it slowly because I wanted to savor every single detail on the pages, and I didn't want to miss a single word, nor did I want to lose track of her world building. On the minus side, the first few sentences in this book worried me as they are a bit overdone! Don't let that put you off because thankfully that only lasts for a few sentences and Bear's story telling abilities quickly take over.

2012) (The first book in the Eternal Sky series) A novel by Elizabeth Bear.

The characters of Range of Ghosts are subtle and achingly damaged. Temur and Samarkar, the novel’s two main protagonists, are caught in a war forced on them by the circumstance of their birth. Both of royal blood, Samarkar and Temur both struggle with the duty and responsibility of their elevated place in the world in different manners. This is legend brought to life, with all the grandeur associated with creation stories from the various cultures that Bear draws inspiration from.

Temur, grandson of the Great Khan, is walking away from a battlefield where he was left for dead. All around lie the fallen armies of his cousin and his brother, who made war to rule the Khaganate. Temur is now the legitimate heir by blood to his grandfather's throne, but he is not the strongest. Going into exile is the only way to survive his ruthless cousin.

Once-Princess Samarkar is climbing the thousand steps of the Citadel of the Wizards of Tsarepheth. She was heir to the Rasan Empire until her father got a son on a new wife. Then she was sent to be the wife of a Prince in Song, but that marriage ended in battle and blood. Now she has renounced her worldly power to seek the magical power of the wizards. These two will come together to stand against the hidden cult that has so carefully brought all the empires of the Celadon Highway to strife and civil war through guile and deceit and sorcerous power.

The Eternal Sky Trilogy#1 Range of Ghosts#2 Shattered Pillars#3 Steles of the Sky

Reviews: 7
Ariseym
You have to love a man who names his heroic horse "Dumpling".

You have to love a princess who trades her broodmare status for the hope of power.

You have to love a quest group that consists of three women and a dude who respects them all.

If you go to describe this story, it is easy to get tangled in the A plot and the B plot and trying to figure out what's about to go on, but when you're reading it, it's very seamless. As you realize that all these plotlines are converging, the story seems to pick up speed and momentum, tumbling to a not-quite-conclusion.

As usual, Bear's writing shows the toolmarks of master craftsmanship, and once in a while has showstopping images:

"As the sky dimmed, the glow they twinkled in was cast by candles, fixed in glass jars to the shells of ambling tortoises, so as the sun set, the whole of the garden was filled with a moving light. Birds sang themselves to sleep in the tree branches, and the twilight made a canopy overhead."

And one that would be a spoiler, but eek, hungry ghosts!

One of the things I enjoyed most was the exploration of fertility and the consequences of chosen infertility. There were so many details that bespoke long thought about how this could be made to work in a pre-industrial era. There are apples studded with nails to build up iron, and an emphasis on the consumption of soy to provide phytoestrogens. The real chance of death by infection. But the beautiful payoff for all of this is here:

"She folded her legs one atop the other and brought her hands before her groin, where the center of creation had once lived and lived no longer. There was the essence of wizardry. It was an act of creation; it was a pure delight in defiance of hunger, and thirst, and sorrow, and the inevitability of death and devouring. As she had sacrificed the power of creation with her body, so she gained the power of creation with her mind."

As a woman and a mother, I thought this was immensely moving, to take all the iconography of childbearing and turn it into magic available only to those who choose not to bear.

The story is obviously headed toward the second book, but I feel ok about that. In the meantime, I keep having moments where I forget I've finished the book and I look forward to reading more about Samarkar and Temur and Bansh. Will they defeat the rakh-rider? Is Temur about to have some 'splainin to do? Where will they travel next? I'm looking forward to finding out.
in waiting
This story is way too slow. It was literally 1/3 of the book before any of the protagonists decided to take strong action--around 112 pages of 334. It's hard to like characters that are walking with no plan (Temur) or waiting to see if they have magic power (Samarkar).

And then the rest of the story is pretty much traveling. They have a few fights on the road and share some backstory with each other. But until the very last 5% of the book no real progress is made.

And the ending isn't one at all. It's not even a pause. It's just a break until book 2.

Why it's not 1 or 2 stars is the wonderful cultural descriptions. It's an Eastern to Middle Eastern medieval world, not European, and it's subtle and nuanced. But that's pretty much it. Some good scenes but lots of reacting rather than pursuing a goal.
Tiainar
I just finished reading this wonderful fantasy by Elizabeth Bear and at first I decided not to review it. I was not sure how to describe it, or how to explain exactly why I loved it. However, I wanted to pass the word along with the other reviewers, because I feel as if this is a book that should not be missed.
This book is so different than the normal fantasy books I am attracted too. However, this was a recommended book on a review web site, and it just caught my eye. I am so glad I gave it a chance. There is magic, sorcery, action, romance and an array of cultures and world building that was outstanding. I was not sure if I would like it when I first started it, but once I got into the flow of the writing and the names of the characters, it was such a joy to read. I never knew what was around the corner and I got so attached to the characters. Even the villains are so interesting, I just could not stop reading it.
There was a cliff hanger ending, so if you are looking for something that is stand alone, this may not be for you, but I cannot wait until the next book to see not only what happens to the characters, but what the author is going to come up with. It is beautifully written, just a wonderful read.