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ISBN:076534596X
Author: Glen Cook
ISBN13: 978-0765345967
Title: The Tyranny of the Night: Book One of the Instrumentalities of the Night
Format: lit azw lrf lit
ePUB size: 1533 kb
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Language: English
Category: Fantasy
Publisher: Tor Fantasy (October 31, 2006)

The Tyranny of the Night: Book One of the Instrumentalities of the Night by Glen Cook



Welcome to the world of the Instrumentalities of the Night, where imps, demons, and dark gods rule in the spaces surrounding upstart humanity. At the edges of the world stand walls of ice which push slowly forward to reclaim the land for the night. And at the world's center, in the Holy Land where two great religions were born, are the Wells of Ihrain, the source of the gr Welcome to the world of the Instrumentalities of the Night, where imps, demons, and dark gods rule in the spaces surrounding upstart humanity  . And that, my Tiny Arthropods, is quite an achievement indeed.

Book one of the instrumentalities of the night. A tom doherty associates book new york. NOTE If you purchased this book without a cover, you should be aware bat this book is stolen property. It was reported as unsold and destroyed to the publisher, and neither the author nor the publisher has received any payment for this stripped book. This is a work of fiction. All the characters and events portrayed in this novel are either fictitious or are used fictitiously. They were amongst the most common terrors generated by the Instrumentalities of the Night, known wherever men sat round campfires and looked out at the eyes of the Night They were more dangerous in number than as individuals. Any semicompetent hedge wizard could run a singleton off or keep a pack from breaking into the circle of light. It was reported as "unsold and destroyed" to the publisher, and neither the author nor the publisher has received any payment for this "stripped book. Even a normal, unskilled man could handle a singleton if he kept his wits about him. Powdered wolfbane would chase those spawn of Night.

Welcome to the world of the Instrumentalities of the Night, where imps, demons, and dark gods rule in the spaces surrounding upstart humanity. And at the world's center, in the Holy Land where two great religions were born, are the Wells of Ihrain, the source of the greatest magics. Over the last century the Patriarchs of the West have demanded crusades to claim the Wells from the Pramans, the followers of the Written. Welcome to the world of the Instrumentalities of the Night, where imps, demons, and dark gods rule in the spaces surrounding upstart humanity.

Book 1 of 4 in the Instrumentalities of the Night Series. By the time the book ends, either you've absorbed enough of the irritating trivia or you learned to ignore it enough that you become engrossed in the story. Unfortunately, that's when the book ends. It's not a bad ending for a series. It's just that you finally feel like you're reading a Glen Cook book instead of a history book and then it's gone.

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Usually I love the thing, because I just enjoy the way the man tells stories. But even I have to say this book/series was difficult to get real excited about. However, since Cook wrote it, I finally gave it a try and was glad I did s. ith The Tyranny of the Night, Cook takes us to a thinly concealed 13th century Europe. Sorry, I digressed there

One of the mad daughters of the Walker had been exiled for loving a mortal. The air grew as cold as the land of ice farther north. The blankets of darkness squabbled like sparrows aboard the longship. Mohkam and Akir came running with the falcon, pushing the carriage.

НУЖНА ВЫЧИТКА !!! Welcome to the world of the Instrumentalities of the Night, where imps, demons, and dark gods rule in the spaces surrounding upstart humanity. Over the last century the Patriarchs of the West have demanded crusades to claim the Wells from the Pramans, the followers of the Written

At the edges of the world stand walls of ice which push slowly forward to reclaim the land for the night. And at the worlds center, in the Holy Land where two great religions were born, are the Wells of Ihrain, the source of the greatest magics. Now an uneasy truce extends between the Pramans and the West, waiting for a spark to start the conflict anew. Garrett For Hire is "fantasy noir at its best" (Library Journal), collecting three novels from Glen Cook's classic urban fantasy series.

Welcome to the world of the Instrumentalities of the Night, where imps, demons, and dark gods rule in the spaces surrounding upstart humanity. At the edges of the world stand walls of ice which push slowly forward to reclaim the land for the night. And at the world's center, in the Holy Land where two great religions were born, are the Wells of Ihrain, the source of the greatest magics. Over the last century the Patriarchs of the West have demanded crusades to claim the Wells from the Pramans, the followers of the Written. Now an uneasy truce extends between the Pramans and the West, waiting for a spark to start the conflict anew.

Then, on a mission in the Holy Land, the young Praman warrior Else is attacked by a creature of the Dark-in effect, a minor god. Too ignorant to know that he can never prevail over such a thing, he fights it and wins, and in so doing, sets the terrors of the night against him.

As a reward for his success, Else is sent as a spy to the heart of the Patriarchy to direct their attention away from further ventures into the Holy Lands. Dogged by hidden enemies and faithless allies, Else witnesses senseless butchery and surprising acts of faith as he penetrates to the very heart of the Patriarchy and rides alongside their armies in a new crusade against his own people. But the Night rides with him, too, sending two of its once-human agents from the far north to assassinate him.

Submerged in his role, he begins to doubt his faith, his country, even his family. As his mission careens out of control, he faces unanswerable questions about his future. It is said that God will know his own, but can one who has slain gods ever know forgiveness?

In The Tyranny of the Night, Glen Cook introduces a new fantasy epic for the ages.

Reviews: 7
Rayli
First thing, this book will not appeal to everyone. Without at least a basic knowledge of Middle Ages Europe, the Middle-East, and the Crusades; most of what is being written (and not being written) will pass over the reader's head. The countries, mountains, seas, religions, and religious figures all have different names; but almost everything has a real or historical counterpart from our own history.

Second warning, if you have read Glen Cook's other works; especially the Dread Empire series and the Black Company; this entire series is rife with tropes from his other writings. Else Tage might as well be Bragi Ragnarson except he was raised as a Sha-Lug in Dreanger (Mameluk in Egypt). Most of the characters from this series have analogies in his other books; though the Ninth Unknown (does not appear in this first book) is refreshing and interesting. Other well-hashed themes include an extremely jaded view of religion, creepy pedophilia, MERCENARIES!!!!!, and lots of grandmas sucking eggs.

The side-story characters from the End of Connec are well-written and original; but also are left holding the bag on most of the less action-packed parts of the series. The reader gets a real "meanwhile, back at the ranch" feel whenever it cuts to them. Though writing is of good quality from the viewpoint of the good-hearted, long suffering people on the opposite end of the war the protagonist is involved in; it also doesn't really seem to add to the book. One could cut out all the Brother Candle parts from the series; and still have an interesting (if much abbreviated) book.

Likewise, the main character's viewpoint changes in some ways that are very well-planned and written; and others that don't follow logically. Else Tage is alternates from dangerously saavy and wise; to naive and the victim of a narrow-world view. It seems that when it comes to survival instincts, he's a genius; but is mentally slow to a fault in personal matters.

In the later books, much like the Black Company characters they are expys of; Heris (Sleepy), Vali and Lila (Shukrat and Arkana) become very interesting later in the series and have the capability to steal the show and make things interesting.

Now, if you are still reading, this is still a good book and Cook's writing always pulls you in. Forearmed and forewarned about the need of a historical context, the reader should be able to put 2 and 2 together in regards to places and Gods. In fact, figuring them out at times takes on a side activity to the book. Even with a pretty good knowledge of history and geography I'm not sure where Grolsach is.
The fact that no one is black and white or even a static character keeps things interesting and keeps things from getting too dry.
Buge
This volume resembles the writing style found in the Dread Empire series, The Dragon Never Sleeps, and The Tower of Fear, with some emphasis on politics and political intrigue, though nothing to the degree in Shadowline. Cook has described this series as taking place in a political map roughly that of 12th century europe, but in a world where both the black sea and the mediterranean sea are landlocked, and thus those seas are substantially shallower than in our world (evaporation rate of both would be higher than replacement without the atlantic influx), as well as the notable factor that magic is real and gods are active in this world. I will note that the huge number of kingdoms named in this book make lack of any geographic reference impossible. Even in Dread Empire there were only a handful of named major kingdoms, with a few more salted in over time. A handful of references to major historical events in the roman ('brothen') period (Teutoberg Forest, Hannibal Barco's years in Italy, the backdrop of several Crusades in preceding centuries) provide some roadmarks, but you are pretty much on your own.

This book follow 3 viewpoints, the primary being an agent sent into the realm of the vatican to try to gain intelligence useful to agents of a client kingdom of the caliphate (you finally get a clue to where Draegnar is 3/4's of the way through the book as an indirect historical aside, why bother at all). In this world magic and gods are quite real, and the latter play a major role behind the scenes in the plot. As with the books I mention above, Cook provides a brutal story with little of the fluff that much modern fantasy contains, though else's identity not being more widely disseminated seemed dubious, given who knows it.

Great book, looking forward to the next one.
Gerceytone
If you sort these reviews by Lowest Rating First, you'll get a good idea of what's wrong with this book. Essentially, it reads like a text book on Medieval History with all the names changed (except Iceland, oddly). Plus, it has WAY too much geographical, historical, genealogical, political, and religious information in it. After a while, your eyes sort of glaze over and you end up skimming through things. Even after reading the 500 pages in the book, I still couldn't keep the players straight. Also, the secondary characters aren't consistent in their behavior. This is especially bad because it's hard enough to pull up any one name out of the dozens presented. If the characters don't even act the same from appearance to appearance, you're not sure you're thinking of the right person. Having said that, I've got to say there's an excellent story buried in there. By the time the book ends, either you've absorbed enough of the irritating trivia or you learned to ignore it enough that you become engrossed in the story. Unfortunately, that's when the book ends. It's not a bad ending for a series. It's just that you finally feel like you're reading a Glen Cook book instead of a history book and then it's gone. Oh, well. For the story alone, I'd give this a four star rating. But, because of the extraneous baggage Cook adds, I'm reducing my rating by one star to an OK 3 stars out of 5.

The books in Glen Cooks "Instrumentalities of the Night" series are:

1. The Tyranny of the Night: Book One of the Instrumentalities of the Night
2. Lord of the Silent Kingdom (Instrumentalities of the Night)
3. Surrender to the Will of the Night (Instrumentalities of the Night)
4. Working God's Mischief (Instrumentalities of the Night)