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ISBN:1841490881
Author: Sean Russell
ISBN13: 978-1841490885
Title: The One Kingdom (Swans' War)
Format: doc lit azw rtf
ePUB size: 1729 kb
FB2 size: 1365 kb
DJVU size: 1825 kb
Language: English
Category: Fantasy
Publisher: Time Warner Books Uk (March 2002)
Pages: 704

The One Kingdom (Swans' War) by Sean Russell



Sean Russell's strength of slowly stitching together a story with crafty and subtle characterization rather than non-stop action almost works to his disadvantage in book one of The Swan's War trilogy. The story meanders and branches mysteriously like the river along which the essential plot elements unfold, with barely a stretch of white water. It teeters precariously but does not quite topple over the precipice of too slow and too unfocused. The One Kingdom is the first book in The Swan’s War trilogy, and I thought it was a solid epic fantasy debut although I thought there were a few holes in the world building that I’m hopeful the author will explore in the remaining novels. While I enjoyed the story, the Kindle formatting was a bit jarring.

Book Information: Genre: High/Epic Fantasy Author: Sean Russell Name: The One Kingdom Series: Book One of The Swan’s War . Sean Russell THE ONE KINGDOM Book One of The Swan’s War. In the moving landscape only the men were still. THEY SAT AT the long table atop Summer's Hill as motionless as stones in a running stream. Driven here by war, Tarn reminded himself. All the most important things you'll do in this life will exact a price in one way or another, his grandfather liked to say. Once you've made up your mind, pay the price and get on with it.

THE ONE KINGDOM: Book One Of The Swans' War is the first thing I've read by Sean Russell. I liked it. It's intricately plotted and the characters are sympathetic and engaging. There's plenty of action and plenty of skullduggery. First, the mysterious business of slipping in and out of alternate physical realms is never really explained. At least, not to my satisfaction. In The One Kingdom, Mr. Russell provides these things quite well. He has produced a beautifully balanced work of fiction that satisfies the interests of an admittedly "seasoned" reader of fantasy. His prose is smooth and descriptive, his main characters are admirable but imperfect, his portrait of the natural world is nothing short of gorgeous.

Russell, Sean - Swan's War 3 - The Shadow Roads. Russell, Sean - Swan's War 3 - The Shadow Roads. Russell, Sean - Swan War 1 - One Kingdom. Russell, Sean - Swan's War 1 - The One Kingdom. com/abclit Russell, Sean - Swan's War 1 - The One Kingdom.

March 2002 : UK Paperback.

Sean Russell has proven himself a master of intelligent fantasy - subtle, exciting, well-crafted. The One Kingdom grew out of two quite separate ideas. For a long time I'd been kicking around the idea of a group of characters travelling down a river by raft, reliving, in very odd forms, many of the events in Huckleberry Finn - but all in a fantasy setting. The second idea was to have two feuding families, like the Montagues and the Capulets, who'd split a kingdom over who would succeed the throne. It took me a long time to realize that these stories actually went together. Of course almost nothing remains of the original ideas.

Sean Russell's voice reminds me of the great fantasies I read in the late 1970's and early 1980's, before everything sounded and looked the same - 800 page novels in 15 book series, where the story never seems to progress and there is nothing to distinguish one character from another. The story in "The One Kingdom" progresses quickly, and each of. the characters has a unique voice and the story is driven as much by the characters themselves, and not by long passages of exposition

Sean Russell is the author of The One Kingdom and The Isle of Battle, previous books in the Swans' War trilogy, plus the River into Darkness books: Compass of the Soul and Beneath the Vaulted Hills; the Moontide and Magic Rise books: Sea Without a Shore and World Without End; and Gatherer of Clouds and The Initiate Brother. He lives on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, with his wife and son. Библиографические данные. The One Kingdom: Book One Of The Swan's War Trilogy Swans' War Series (Том 1). Автор.

Author: Sean Russell. Pages: 704. Publisher: Orbit. Tag: Fantasy/Sci-Fiction. Ebooks list page : 13573.

The One Kingdom - Sean Russell. Driven here by war, Tam reminded himself. All the most important things you’ll do in this life will exact a price in one way or another, his grandfather liked to say. Once you’ve made up your mind, pay the price and get on with it.

From their home in the Vale of Lakes, a group of young traders embark on a quest to make their fortune. Carrying a cargo of ancient artefacts, their journey along the River Wynnd will take them into a world both strange and terrifying. They will meet extraordinary people, witness unforgettable events and discover something that will change their lives for ever. For the world is a far more complex place than the adventurers could have imagined. In the aftermath of a terrible war, political upheaval and family rivalries threaten to plunge the land into a new dark age. The past, it seems, is far from forgotten. And the consequences of that long-ago war are by no means played out. Look out for more information about this book and others on the Orbit website at www.orbitbooks.co.uk
Reviews: 7
Conjuril
“The One Kingdom” is the first book in “The Swan’s War” trilogy, and I thought it was a solid epic fantasy debut although I thought there were a few holes in the world building that I’m hopeful the author will explore in the remaining novels. While I enjoyed the story, the Kindle formatting was a bit jarring. Many times, I found words chopped up, which caused me to stumble. For example, I would be reading along and hit something like “of ten” instead of often and “be a ring” bearing.

The novel was light on detailed battle scenes, but it did include several small conflicts that kept the plot moving along. The author chose to spend a lot of time focusing on the political maneuverings of the Wills and Renne families that are battling one another for the right to rule the entire kingdom. Mixed into this struggle is the journey of three young men – Tam, Fynnol, and Baore, as they travel down the mystical Wyrr river in search of a little adventure.

The young men found their adventure and more!

The three young men reminded me of Robert Jordan’s “Wheel of Time” series especially since one of the boys is quiet and seems to be destined for leadership, one is a jokester, and the other is a big, heavily muscled young man. They boys are decent archers and come from a small, distant village. One aspect that is different is the author putting them into a setting where there is mention of sorcerers and magic, but the system is not explored or understood much in this first novel. At most, there is a hint of some mystic powers associated with the Wyrr River.

One aspect I liked about this story is that it was a clean read. I think the story holds its own against the likes of George R.R. Martin’s “A Song of Ice and Fire”, but does so without language, brutality, and sex scenes.

The main female character, Elise Wills, seems a bit weak, but I’m guessing her role will expand immensely in the next novel. Her story slowly builds to a climax and ends in a bit of a cliff hanger at the end of the first book.

I mentioned there were some perceived holes in the world building. I may have missed it in the story, but I don’t recall the source of the original conflict between the two warring families. I also don’t recall much detail on the betrayals with the “Knights of the Vow” and the Renne family. I would have also appreciated more backstory on Wyrr, the ancient enchanter, and what exactly is the deal with his three children who seem to be some kind of water spirits. I will gladly push on to the next novel in the series in hopes I can find answers to these questions.
Rich Vulture
I'm not as widely read in the fantasy genre as many other people out there. I've read and loved Tolkien and I've also read stuff by Brooks, Kay, Donaldson, Martin and others, but I haven't yet gotten around to Hobb, Goodkind, Jordan or many other popular fantasy writers. Tolkien is my standard. THE ONE KINGDOM: Book One Of The Swans' War is the first thing I've read by Sean Russell. I liked it. It's intricately plotted and the characters are sympathetic and engaging. There's plenty of action and plenty of skullduggery.
So, why four stars and not five? After thinking over that question for a while, I concluded that THE ONE KINGDOM fell a little short for me in a couple of ways. First, the mysterious business of slipping in and out of alternate physical realms is never really explained. At least, not to my satisfaction. Second, I don't yet know what some of the main characters are doing in this story. Tam and his friends are deeply enmeshed in what's going on, but it isn't clear why. In THE LORD OF THE RINGS (and other favorites) everyone's role is clearly defined, even though you don't know how they'll end up. Here, major characters just seem to have gotten caught up by accident, although there are hints at deeper connections. There's no clear motivation for risking necks outside of getting what's owed and getting home again. That doesn't seem quite adequate, somehow.
THE ONE KINGDOM is fun. For me it was a page-turner. I enjoyed it and will definitely read the next book in the series. It's not, however, quite on a par with Tolkien or some other fantasy novels I've read. I recommend it, but there are others I would recommend ahead of it.
Bludworm
Different people come to fantasy looking for different things. Some want action and suspense. Some want escape. Some want the visual experience of rich, descriptive prose. Others enjoy the aesthetics of the medieval age.

Different readers also bring differing preconceptions. They have varying levels of prior knowledge in friendship, romance, athletics, philosophy, medieval history, linguistics, anthropology, and other subjects that are frequented by fantasy authors.

Readers who purchase The One Kingdom by Sean Russell will therefore differ in their reactions. Some will enjoy it, others may dislike it. It all depends on what they're looking for and what they bring to the work.

Personally, I enjoyed the book very well. Here are some of the things I look for in a work of fantasy: descriptive prose, sympathetic and complex main characters, a rich portrayal of nature, plausible action, moderate pacing, and a passing realistic portrayal of feudal society. I suppose, in essence, I look for grown-up fantasy. I prefer works that are sophisticated in their understanding of people and politics, but nevertheless an escape from the boredom and dross of the ordinary world.

In The One Kingdom, Mr. Russell provides these things quite well. He has produced a beautifully balanced work of fiction that satisfies the interests of an admittedly "seasoned" reader of fantasy. His prose is smooth and descriptive, his main characters are admirable but imperfect, his portrait of the natural world is nothing short of gorgeous. There is plenty of action, and his portrayal of feudal society is far from romantic. In these respects, Mr. Russell's book is more than adequate.

In fact, his book is excellent. There are moments when his prose verges on poetry, when his characters come vividly alive. To immerse yourself in his world is to take a long journey down a glittering river at dawn. And though you journey for what seems like hours, or days, the harsh sun never ascends. You are always adrift in that new hour, that soft light, when the dew is still fresh on the ground, and the mist still clings to the air. There are wonders on his river. Enjoy the journey.