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ISBN:0440236576
Author: Mary Balogh
ISBN13: 978-0440236573
Title: No Man's Mistress (The Mistress Trilogy)
Format: mobi lit docx doc
ePUB size: 1963 kb
FB2 size: 1714 kb
DJVU size: 1105 kb
Language: English
Category: Historical
Publisher: Dell (May 28, 2002)

No Man's Mistress (The Mistress Trilogy) by Mary Balogh



The Secret Mistress book. I would absolutely recommend this book to readers who like gentle, character-driven romances with likable people. Mary Balogh has a very distinct writing style and it just works for me on so many levels. I also think this story could easily be read as a stand-alone due to the fact that it is actually a prequel to the first two Mistress books despite it being labeled as number three in the trilogy.

NO MAN'S MISTRESS is the second book in the Mistress Trilogy. It is the story of Lord Ferdinand Dudley who wins an estate in a card game only to find out that it is already inhabited by Viola Thornhill, who insists that the estate is hers. The two match series over the estate. I'd rate this book .

No Man's Mistress book. Marriage was out of the question, and she would be no man’s mistress. Even as Dudley’s unnerving presence, his knowing smile, threatened to melt her resolve. Against his better judgment, Lord Ferdinand Dudley was beguiled. This maddening beauty had stirred him as no woman had before. And he was bound and determined to make her his ow. .

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No Man’s Mistress, first published in 2001, is the story of Tresham’s brother, Lord Ferdinand Dudley, and Viola Thornhill, with whom he comes into conflict when he wins a country manor in a card game but discovers when he goes to claim it that she is living there and insists the house belongs to he. More than a Mistress. Mary Balogh has a talent for creating lead characters whose conflicts camouflage how right they are for each othe.In Jocelyn and Jane the author has created two of her best–and that’s saying something. ne of the satisfying aspects of the story is seeing how Jocelyn and Jane perfectly complement each other and watching them slowly discover it too. The sexual tension between them builds convincingly–their verbal exchanges are better foreplay than pages of purple physical description. Lesley Dunlap for The Romance Reader.

Readers have fallen in love with Mary Balogh’s sparkling blend of wit and romance No Man’s Mistress. The dark, devastating stranger rode into the village fair and wagered twenty pounds at the throwing booth - for a chance to win the daisies in Viola Thornhill’s hair. The Gypsy fortune teller had warned: Beware of a tall, dark, handsome stranger. He can destroy you - if you do not first snare his heart.

She was unlike any woman he’d ever.

In anticipation of the enticing third book in the Mistress trilogy, The Secret Mistress, here are ed scenes from More than a Mistress and No Man’s Mistress - plus Mary Balogh’s new epilogue for the series. JOCELYN AND JANE: Three new scenes- The Proposal, The Wedding, and Return to Acton Park -spark more fiery passion from charmingly arrogant Jocelyn and spirited Jane. FERDINAND AND VIOLA: Two unpublished scenes- The Wedding and Home to Pinewood Manor -prove once again that this unlikely but perfect couple is made for each other

About No Man’s Mistress. Critics call her a veritable treasure, a matchless storyteller (Romantic Times). Readers have fallen in love with Mary Balogh’s sparkling blend of wit and romance. Now this dazzling writer sweeps us back to Regency England, into a world of dangerous secrets and glittering intrigue, as a dashing lord meets his match in a fiery beauty who vows to b. o Man’s Mistress.

The maypole at the center of the green, its colored ribbons fluttering in the breeze, proclaimed the occasion. It was May Day. Later, the young men would dance about the maypole with the partners of their choice, as they did with great energy and enthusiasm every year. Meanwhile, there were races and other contests to draw attention to the green. Pitched about its perimeter were tented booths with their offerings of appetizing foods, eye-catching baubles, and challenging games of skill or strength or chance

Critics call her “a veritable treasure, a matchless storyteller” (Romantic Times). Readers have fallen in love with Mary Balogh’s sparkling blend of wit and romance. Now this dazzling writer sweeps us back to Regency England, into a world of dangerous secrets and glittering intrigue, as a dashing lord meets his match in a fiery beauty who vows to be ... No Man’s Mistress.The dark, devastating stranger rode into the village fair and wagered twenty pounds at the throwing booth — for a chance to win the daisies in Viola Thornhill’s hair. The Gypsy fortune teller had warned: “Beware of a tall, dark, handsome stranger. He can destroy you — if you do not first snare his heart.”Recklessly Viola flirted, then danced with him around the Maypole. And then came his delicate, delicious kiss. Viola did not regret that she had let down her guard — until the next morning, when he appeared at her door to claim her beloved Pinewood Manor. Lord Ferdinand Dudley won her home in a game of cards!Viola hated him for trying to take everything, including her soul. She was mistress of Pinewood Manor. Yet Dudley refused to leave, even as his conscience rebelled at compromising this beautiful innocent whose only proof of ownership was a dead earl’s promise. Dudley held the deed, but at what cost? Each day under the same roof brought its share of temptation, intimacy, and guilt. But Viola knew it was a battle she could not afford to lose. Marriage was out of the question, and she would be no man’s mistress. Even as Dudley’s unnerving presence, his knowing smile, threatened to melt her resolve.Against his better judgment, Lord Ferdinand Dudley was beguiled. This maddening beauty had stirred him as no woman had before. And he was bound and determined to make her his own.At once sensuous, whimsical, and wonderfully romantic, Mary Balogh’s new novel holds us in thrall, bringing to life a love story that sizzles with passion and originality.
Reviews: 7
Dead Samurai
This was my favorite for a 'fun" read. The heroine Judith seemed to me to be the primary focus of the work, rather than Rannulf, which was a little disappointing since I prefer stories of "heroes". Judith's character is a typical & standard character - a penniless middle daughter of a lower member of the gentry with a spoiled only son who hasn't a clue about life and is bankrupting the family. She is sent off to be a poor relation/unpaid servant in an aunt's household that consists of the quintessential ton females and males- scheming, self-centered and soulless. One of the things which makes this a memorable story is the one character "flaw" Judith has; an inherited acting talent acquired by her grandmother that no one in the family wants known about. Although she is paired with Ranulf - the "fun" member of the family that looks like a viking warrior & who also has been "wandering" through life not certain of where he fits in or what his destiny holds, there are large segments of the story that do not include him except as a support character. They met when her coach has an accident and he rescues her. She pretends to be someone she isn't in a last ditch try to create a positive memory that will carry her through the long years of spinsterhood she foresees as her future. a fantasy week-end neither expects to continue beyond the moment. The fun begins when it is made known that Rannulf is the man chosen by his grandmother to marry Judith's self-serving cousin. There are four different stories working through this one chapter- Rannulf & Judith, Judith vs her Aunt and Cousins, Judith & reckless brother and Judith allied with her grandmother, the actress, which leads to complex interactions, a steady pace and jumping from one situation to another- although for me, much of the story line was predictable.
Another of the things that made this a fun read were the facets of Rannulf's life the writer lets us see. His acceptance of his unsettled lifestyle; his ability to find humor in some weird situations; his personal knowledge that something out there is waiting for him, he just has to find it; and his strong sense of right and wrong, of self and of family support which is characterized through Ms. Balogh's work. I adore "bad boys" who make real "good men".
Gholbimand
I've been a fan of Mary Balough's work for some time now and have read several of her books because she can generally be relied on to write emotionally satisfying books. The first book in the Bedwyn Saga, Slightly Married, was quite good with a nice mix of tension and romance between an angst ridden war hero and a strong, assertive, self-possessed widow living in straightened circumstances. In fact, I so enjoyed the first book, I quickly bought this book, the second in the series about the 6 Bedwyn siblings.

Oh, how I wish I could say that I enjoyed this book as much as the first, but I cannot. The hero was fairly well adjusted if a bit aimless and undisciplined. The heroine, was too willing to accept the judgements, strictures dictates and demands of others, especially those of her father and her aunt. Yes, I understand that times were such that women hand almost no personal or political rights, but they had still voices and some marginal degree of self determination. Any woman who is willing to have a consensual sexual encounter over a period of 2 days with a total stranger is surely capable of being more assertive with those who treat her like a disliked poor relation and glorified servant.

There was nothing in the dialog that convinced me of the 'chemistry' between Rannulf (Ralf) and Judith. There was little in the action that created tension and for this reader, the near absence of tension resulted in boredom. The resolution to the bit of tension around Bran, Judith's brother, was too easily handled and quickly forgotten. I found Ralf entirely too willing to allow Judith to run from him time and time again without so much as cross word or hurt feelings. Finally, I wearied of Judith's self-flagellation over the problems she encountered. Many of her problems were not of her making but she persisted in blaming herself. That is a trait that I cannot abide.

Bottom line: I found this book very "putdownable." Had this book been the first in the series, I'm fairly certain I wouldn't not have moved to the second book. Whether or not I read the third book in the series is still up for debate.
VAZGINO
I've been in "Reader's Desert" lately, began searching backlists and happened upon this one I hadn't read. Nice find.

Judith is on her way to life as a poor relation. Rannulf is on his way to visit his grandmother who is backing him into a marriage he doesn't want. Rainy, muddy, stagecoach overturns, along comes a knight who carries Judith away for a day and two nights of fantasy. She's now Claire Campbell, actress, and he's Ralph. After their dreamy interlude, it's back to the real world.

They're both shocked to find they are now neighbors and the chick who Rannulf's grandmother has lined up for him is Judith's relative. There have to be a number of twists and turns enroute to an hea. Otherwise, there would be no story. And the story was entertaining. I liked it.

Enjoy your reading! :)
energy breath
I enjoyed this book in series but I just couldn’t buy heroine’s totally throwing herself into an affair with no thought of consequences or possibility of conception occurring. This is Regency England and she is a self effacing rector’s daughter. I’m not saying it’s inconceivable, I just found this a weak part of plot. On the other hand, the author must be found of the Brontes as we have a poor parson living in country surrounded by vast open country with a son named Bamwell who is a spoiled wastrel of a spendthrift. This along with 4 sisters...... shades of Bronte home life!