» » The Lady in Gray (Signet Regency Romance)
Download The Lady in Gray (Signet Regency Romance) epub book
ISBN:0451195000
Author: Patricia Oliver
ISBN13: 978-0451195005
Title: The Lady in Gray (Signet Regency Romance)
Format: mbr azw lrf lrf
ePUB size: 1115 kb
FB2 size: 1764 kb
DJVU size: 1371 kb
Language: English
Category: Historical
Publisher: Signet; First Edition edition (February 1, 1999)

The Lady in Gray (Signet Regency Romance) by Patricia Oliver



I picked up The Lady in Gray and remembered it as one I enjoyed before. I found the characters interesting and the plot different than most other Regency novels. The mystery surrounding the former Lady Longueville's death and her rather risque behavior was very unusual. There are few books that show what happens to a woman after her fall from grace. Sylvia was sent to a loving relative's home and seemed to be well treated - I am sure that was NOT the outcome for most disgraced girls.

The Lady in Gray book. The Art of Love Lady Sylvia Sutherland was a young woman of many. Patricia Oliver is a pen name of Patricia De La Fuente. Between 1993 and 2002 she wrote for the Signet Regency Romance imprint and for Jove under her other pseudonym Olivia Fontayne. Books by Patricia Oliver. Mor. rivia About The Lady in Gray.

Patricia Oliver, born a Britisher but now a self-styled Texas native, has a P. in Comparative Literature and teaches English at the university level. She grew up in Argentina and Uruguay, speaks Spanish, and loves horses, cats, gardens, and books. Her Regencies have been Golden Heart and RITA finalists, appeared on Dalton’s and Waldenbooks’ bestseller lists, and have been listed as a Publishers Weekly Recommended Read. The Scandalous Wager won the 1993 Romantic Times Award for Best First Regency Romance. Her Roses for Harriet won the 1995 Romantic Times Award for Best Regency Romance. Her latest Regencies from Signet include The Lady in Gray, February 1999, Scandalous Secrets, December 1999, and Lady Jane’s Nemesis, July 2000. Series: Signet Regency Romance.

1999) A novel by Patricia Oliver. January 1999 : USA Mass Market Paperback. Science Fiction Fantasy Horror Urban Fantasy Paranormal Romance Young Adult Fantasy.

Published February 1, 1999 by Signet. Great Britain, England. 19th century, George III, 1760-1820. Signet Regency Romance.

Download Fortunes Lady (Signet Regency Romance) or any other file from Books category. So perhaps there's something. Regency Romance by Evelyn Richardson; originally published by Signet. Download from free file storage. Скачать с помощью Mediaget. com/Fortune's Lady (Signet Regency Romance).

Publication date 1999. Publisher New York : Signet. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AltheaB on July 13, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Her Regencies have been Golden Heart and RITA finalists, appeared on Dalton's and Waldenbooks' bestseller lists, and have been listed as a Publishers Weekly Recommended Read. Her latest Regencies from Signet include The Lady in Gray, February 1999, Scandalous Secrets, December 1999, and Lady Jane's Nemesis, July 2000.

Lady Jane's Nemesis - Signet Regency Romance Author: Patricia Oliver. A Voluptuous Challenger - Since her birth, Lady Jane Sinclair has been unofficially betrothed to Roger Hastings, heir to Trenton Abbey. But at twenty-five, Jane remains unmarried - and the rumors of Roger's liaison with the immodest Lady Horton have spread like wildfire. more ers - and need not see the face of his lover to recognize the unlaced corset of Lady Horton. Jane is cut by his scandalous behavior, but Roger's roguish figure.

A talented, passionate artist spends her days at the Cornish white cliffs, yearning to recreate nature's beauty on her humble canvas, until the Earl of Longueville threaten to remove the lady from his estate. Despite the gossip surrounding the Earl's tragic past, she gives him the benefit of the doubt, and when he asks her to paint his portrait, she is aghast. The scandalous proposition demands hours of close intimacy, staring into each other's eyes, and feeling the fire of secret passions within their hearts.
Reviews: 4
romrom
Lord Nicholas Morley made a disastrous marriage in 1804. He brought his dazzling, and possibly nymphomaniac, bride to his estate in Cornwall where they lived only a few months before she died under mysterious circumstances. He took his mother and aunt and boarded a ship for India where they lived for the next 10 years.

At about the same time in 1804, Lady Sylvia Sutherland, a headstrong young woman, stymied the marriage plans her father had arranged by running away with another beau whom she loved and found both handsome, and charming. Two weeks later when she was retrieved by her father she discovered her marriage lines were phony, her "husband" had deserted her, and she was irretrievably ruined. She was shipped off to an isolated estate in Cornwall to live with a flamboyant, unconventional, artistic aunt who had lived unmarried with her Italian lover for 10 years. For the next 10 years Lady Sylvia poured all of her passion and energy into her art, becoming a professional-grade artist.

Nicholas and Sylvia meet shortly after the Morley family returns to their estate in Cornwall, and re-enter the social round (which rather amazingly includes the unmarried aunt, her paramour, and the ruined Lady Sylvia). At this point the story develops into a who-done-it mystery around the death of Nicholas's wife 10 years earlier.

There are a number of lost opportunities in this story. For example, Sylvia's aunt and her paramour are an undeveloped secondary romance. After a 20-year love affair which still sizzles after-all-these-years (we are never told why they never married), we are told several times that the Italian lover wants to marry Sylvia's aunt. She refuses but we are never really told why, and her continued refusal appears to cause no strain in their relationship. In another vein, Lady Sylvia always wear gray. Why? This idiosyncrasy is never addressed, though Nicholas near the end has a vision of her by the entry door of his castle wearing a green dress. Perhaps gray was for half-mourning--though it had usually been trimmed with pink--and green for new life).

Finally, Lord Nicholas was thoroughly humiliated by his late wife (so much so that he moved to India for 10 years and only returned to Cornwall due to concerns about his mother's health), and yet Lady Sylvia is offended by his pride and feels he needs to be taken down a couple of notches. I thought it a shame that Nicholas fell in love with Sylvia.

This is my first story from Patricia Oliver. I read reviews of several of her books here and so went to my public library to find one of her works. The Lady in Gray was a disappointment. Cousin Kate, or The Quiet Gentleman by Georgette Heyer are along the same lines, but much better written.
Rainshaper
I was stuck re-reading some Regency novels at a relative's house - ones I had loaned them and had already read before. I picked up The Lady in Gray and remembered it as one I enjoyed before. As I write my review, I am surprised by the other reviews. I found the characters interesting and the plot different than most other Regency novels. The mystery surrounding the former Lady Longueville's death and her rather risque behavior was very unusual. There are few books that show what happens to a woman after her fall from grace. Sylvia was sent to a loving relative's home and seemed to be well treated - I am sure that was NOT the outcome for most disgraced girls. The flashbacks from the Earl's point of view about his marriage to Angelica added very positively to the storyline. He did seem to change his tune very quickly from wanting Sylvia to be his mistress to wanting her as his wife. I am not sure the story showed the emotional connection to have pulled that off as quickly as it did. But this book held my attention and I was happy to have spent an afternoon reading it again.
Onetarieva
I read a lot of regencies because they calm my world. Yes, most are predictable and all reflect a time very unlike our own. This book is very poorly written and is one of the few books I didn't bother finishing. What a waste of time. It is very jumbled, repetitive, predictable and disjointed. In my opinion. I just skimmed the last 100 pages of the book and found that almost painful.