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ISBN:0393079635
Author: Jeff Sharlet
ISBN13: 978-0393079630
Title: Sweet Heaven When I Die: Faith, Faithlessness, and the Country In Between
Format: mbr lrf mobi rtf
ePUB size: 1434 kb
FB2 size: 1748 kb
DJVU size: 1331 kb
Language: English
Category: Religious Studies
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (August 15, 2011)
Pages: 288

Sweet Heaven When I Die: Faith, Faithlessness, and the Country In Between by Jeff Sharlet



He is ingenious, farsighted, and able to excavate the worlds of others, even the flakiest and most fanatical, with uncanny sympathy

Personal Name: Sharlet, Jeff. Geographic Name: United States Religion. Geographic Name: United States Social conditions 20th century. Download Sweet heaven when I die : faith, faithlessness, and the country in between Jeff Sharlet. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags

Sweet Heaven When I Die book. Jeff Sharlet describes his former girlfriend who became a lawyer and a Christian later in life whose liberalism was transformed into Christianity in helping the poor and dispossessed against powerful interest groups.

In Sweet Heaven When I Die, he scours the desert margins of our culture, politics, and religion, training his eye on outlaws, anarchists, fanatics, and saints. In this way, he reveals the unexpected shape of our nation s center, which is to say, our heart. -Peter Trachtenberg, author of 7 Tattoos and The Book of Calamities". He teaches creative nonfiction at Dartmouth College and lives in New Hampshire.

He teaches creative nonfiction at Dartmouth College and lives in New Hampshire. Библиографические данные. Sweet Heaven When I Die: Faith, Faithlessness, and the Country In Between. W. Norton & Company, 2011.

Jeff Sharlet delivers a fine dose of thoughtful skepticism in Sweet Heaven When I Die, his collection of 13 trenchant essays on how we gain, lose, maintain and blindly accept faith. The book belongs to the tradition of long-form, narrative journalism best exemplified by writers such as Joan Didion, John McPhee, Norman Mailer and Sharlet’s contemporary David Samuels. Sharlet contends that this latter faith exists without belief because it operates without understanding. Sweet Heaven When I Die: Faith, Faithlessness, and the Country In Between’ by Jeff Sharlet (Norton). Sweet Heaven goes beyond fringe fundamentalisms and believers’ personal struggles.

Jeff Sharlet is one of the hardest-working journalists I know. He is always hopping on a plane to follow some lead. He is a writer who believes in getting a story directly from the source. It was Sharlet’s work that finally brought the group to the public’s attention. The author’s most recent book, Sweet Heaven When I Die, is a collection of 13 essays about belief, skepticism, and spirituality. Sharlet writes about Brad Will, an anarchist journalist who filmed his own murder by police while covering an uprising in Mexico; BattleCry, an evangelical youth movement devoted to spreading its particular brand of the Christian message; a new-age healer named Sondra Shaye; and renowned intellectual Cornel West

Home All Categories History Books Religious History Books Sweet Heaven When I Die: Faith, Faithlessness, and the Country In Between. ISBN13: 9780393344233. Sweet Heaven When I Die : Faith, Faithlessness, and the Country in Between.

Including extended journeys published here for the first time, Sweet Heaven When I Die offers a portrait of our spiritual landscape that calls to mind Joan Didion's classic Slouching Towards Bethlehem. see all 2 descriptions). He is ingenious, farsighted, and able to excavate the worlds of others, even the flakiest and most fanatical, with uncanny sympathy.

Linked narrative nonfiction from the best-selling author of The Family.

No one explores the borderlands of belief and skepticism quite like Jeff Sharlet. He is ingenious, farsighted, and able to excavate the worlds of others, even the flakiest and most fanatical, with uncanny sympathy. Here, he reports back from the far reaches of belief, whether in the clear mountain air of "Sweet Fuck All, Colorado" or in a midnight congregation of urban anarchists celebrating a victory over police. From Dr. Cornel West to legendary banjo player Dock Boggs, from the youth evangelist Ron Luce to America's largest "Mind, Body, Spirit Expo," Sharlet profiles religious radicals, realists, and escapists. Including extended journeys published here for the first time, Sweet Heaven When I Die offers a portrait of our spiritual landscape that calls to mind Joan Didion's classic Slouching Towards Bethlehem.
Reviews: 7
Tiv
Full disclosure: I've known Jeff since college. But I've never read more than a few pages of his previous books, for various reasons.

But this book. I cannot put it down. He is such a beautiful writer. I would read his description of a rock if he wrote one.

He studied literary nonfiction at our college and at the time, I thought, what the hell is that? But it's this book - a collection of his essays previously published in Harper's & Rolling Stone. It's every sentence he writes. You feel richer for having read each one.

Even if you don't care about religion and politics, buy this book and read it. Even on your iPhone, like I've been doing.

Yes, it's that good.
Ffleg
I've read a lot of what Jeff Sharlet has written for the information - I wanted to learn what he had found out about C Street, for example. This is the first opportunity I have had to read him for his writing and for his insight into the human beings he writes about. His prose is clean and elegant. His profile are both clear-eyed and sympathetic. Very beautifully done.
Iseared
I selected 3 stars because I prefer Jeff's investigative reporting. It was an interesting read but tended to be a bit depressing to me. Someone else may have a different perspective!
Nikohn
This is a good book which is at times almost too tightly written. But then the meaning of life can only be approached obliquely. Sharlet uses life stories as metaphor and it works.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
A beautiful writer of odd and interesting subjects.
Viashal
"Sweet Heaven When I Die" is, for the observer of American religion, either a shock or a relief. Thank God, I say--the American spiritual landscape is not, after all, captured in Gallup polls (much less Barna or Pew), in percentages of church (or other "places of worship") attendance, which are the preferred measurements of tone-deaf newspapers and political strategists. As he has been doing for well over a decade, but here better than ever, Jeff Sharlet shows that, and how, the heart of this country's spiritual life is in its supposed fringes. A New Age snake-oil saleswoman greases the engines of New York's high-end real estate market. A UFO enthusiast becomes one of Washington's chief fundamentalist power-brokers. A huge media monopoly corners the market on the underground punk scene. What do punks have to do with "faith"? By the time you get to them you'll know.

For the non-observer of American religion, however, "Sweet Heaven" is even better, because you won't be clouded by all the dumb hang-ups. This is, above all, a book of stories, and a book about people--mainly extraordinary "ordinary" people whom the author encounters by accident or intention. Each story holds its own, and where there are points to be made, they're made only by implication, through the lives of those we meet. It's about radical aspirations, and the creep of big money into small communities, and it's about music, frustration, land, and desire. Two chapter titles include the same expletive.

This book reminds me why, when I discovered Sharlet's first book, "Killing the Buddha," I was almost afraid to read it. He exposes us to ourselves in a way that's uncomfortably dead-on, yet also so pleasurable, and funny, that you'll want it never to end.
Tygrarad
Such a pleasure to finally hold a hard-bound book of Sharlet's essays in my hands, the true stories he's held closest to his heart, collecting on the side as he worked on The Family and C Street. Knowing Jeff, I've read some of these before, on screen at KillingTheBuddha.com (a site he founded and I continue to help edit) and amid the ephemeral pages of Rolling Stone and Harper's. But between the covers of Sweet Heaven When I Die, on thick stock, they're richer with the re-reading. For the many essays that were new to me, I got a fresh look at what I've always loved about his writing, the anti-scripture of a man who is crazy about a world that drives him mad, in love with ordinary people around us that he can see are larger than life. The comparison to Joan Didion is apt. He writes passages like this, from the tale of a college love from Colorado and a return visit to see her years later:

"She thought she might study religion. She bought herself a concordance. She would sit cross-legged on the floor, the concordance's giant pages spread on her lap like the wings of a gull, a cup of wine or a bottle of whiskey in one hand and a Marlboro in the other. Her back curved like calligraphy--she had worn a brace as a girl, and her legs were a bit crooked, and her toes wrapped onto one another because when she was little she'd refused to abandon a pair of shoes that she'd loved--and she would parse scripture."

Read Sweet Heaven because you love words and stories. Read because you long and love. Read Sweet Heaven because you believe, or wish you did.

Buy the book, for yourself and a friend.
Woah. This book was dope. The essays really -are- great. So many layers, and sweet on the ear. I just picked it up for a second to check out the latest and ended up reading the whole thing through the first two days I had it. Even though the prose is rich and intricate and lovely, the stories somehow feel very raw. Like I'm getting them firsthand. So it feels like I was just picked up by this crazymaking funnel cloud with Jeff Sharlet and sucked up and dropped in these weird pockets of America and beyond, each for just long enough to see some scene-to-be-reckoned-with before being pulled up and sucked over to the next place. And now, having finished the book and having been finally deposited back into my freshly windtorn home sweet home, I'm not quite sure what to make of it yet and I'm slowly standing up, stunned, in the wreckage, making certain my limbs are intact before I begin picking my way out of the busted up boards and reassembling my house, or maybe just making a new one.