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ISBN:124084252X
Author: Samuel Doolittle
ISBN13: 978-1240842520
Title: A sermon occasioned by the late earthquake which happen'd in London and other places on the eighth of September, 1692 / Preached to a congregation in Reading by Samuel Doolittle. (1692)
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Language: English
Publisher: EEBO Editions, ProQuest (January 3, 2011)
Pages: 44

A sermon occasioned by the late earthquake which happen'd in London and other places on the eighth of September, 1692 / Preached to a congregation in Reading by Samuel Doolittle. (1692) by Samuel Doolittle



Samuel Pepys (1633-1703) – Samuel Pepys is most famous for keeping a diary for most of the 1660s, so he wrote a lot about the Great Fire in 1666. He also played an important part in helping to fight the fire by warning King Charles II that more needed to be done on the day the fire broke out – so, the King himself and the Duke of York took charge. King Charles II (1630-1685) – King Charles II ruled from 1660-1685, and was king during the Great Fire of London.

What is an Earthquake? Earthquakes are natural disasters that happen on our planet. An earthquake happens when the earths plates shift and slide, sometimes resulting with catostrophic results First I will explain how earthquakes on plates happen earth The earth has a couple plates, they are separated as continental and oceanic plates. Normal faults are rocks that are moving up or down from each other. Reverse faults are caused by two rocks pushing against each other. Strike-slip faults are two rocks that are moving past eachother, they are not going up or down, they are moving left and right from each other. The San andreas fault in California is a strike-slip fault.

However, in September 1666, he stayed in London and took charge of the operation to save the city. His plan was to create fire- breaks. This required knocking down perfectly good buildings but starving the fire of the wood it needed to burn. As with the Great Plague of 1665, a great deal of information we have about the Great Fire comes from Samuel Pepys who kept a diary of the event poor people staying in their houses as long as till the very fire touched them, and then running into boats or clambering from one pair of stairs by the waterside, to another.

Reading: The great fire of London. For the question 1-5 chose the correct answer. The great fire of London. The London of the middle of the 17th century was a city of narrow, dirty streets. Indeed, the streets were so narrow that it was often possible for a person at a window on one side of the street to shake hands with a neighbour on the otherside. It broke out late on a Saturday night in a street not far from London Bridge. The summer had been dry, a hot east wind blew and the fire spread quickly. This is what we read in the diary of John Evelyn, who saw the terrible fire with his own eyes. The Thames was covered with boats full of people. On the other side one could see carts carrying out the saved goods out into the fields and people putting up tents. At night the fire could be seen ten miles away. The fire burned for five days and destroyed the greater part of the city.

that a permanent, year-round site was necessary B. as well as field trips focused on the natural world C. many hours of service to wildlife care and fundraising D. that had been injured or orphaned because of intense E. that needed public attention and a new building F. as well as teach children and adults about nature G. through education programmes. and on-site tours Прочитайте текст и выполните задания 7-13. Shape it up: tips you can follow for a healthier campus diet.

Because of the flourish with which John Hancock signed the Declaration of Independence, his name become synonymous with signature. 18. Segregation in public schools was declare unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in 1954. 19. Sirius, the Dog Star, is the most brightest star in the sky with an absolute magnitude about twenty-three times that of the Sun. 20. Killer whales tend to wander in family clusters that hunt, play, and resting together. 21. Some of the most useful resistor material are carbon, metals, and metallic alloys

At this time, most London houses were of wood and pitch construction, dangerously flammable, and it did not take long for the fire to expand. The fire leapt to the hay and feed piles on the yard of the Star Inn at Fish Street Hill, and spread to the Inn. The strong wind that blew that night sent sparks that next ignited the Church of St. Margaret, and then spread to Thames Street, with its riverside warehouses and wharves filled with food for the flames: hemp, oil, tallow, hay, timber, coal and spirits along with other combustibles.

This book represents an authentic reproduction of the text as printed by the original publisher. While we have attempted to accurately maintain the integrity of the original work, there are sometimes problems with the original work or the micro-film from which the books were digitized. This can result in errors in reproduction. Possible imperfections include missing and blurred pages, poor pictures, markings and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world's literature. ++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:++++A sermon occasioned by the late earthquake which happen'd in London and other places on the eighth of September, 1692 / Preached to a congregation in Reading by Samuel Doolittle.Doolittle, Samuel.36 p.London: Printed by J.R. for J. Salusbury ... 1692.Wing / D1880EnglishReproduction of the original in the Bodleian Library++++This book represents an authentic reproduction of the text as printed by the original publisher. While we have attempted to accurately maintain the integrity of the original work, there are sometimes problems with the original work or the micro-film from which the books were digitized. This can result in errors in reproduction. Possible imperfections include missing and blurred pages, poor pictures, markings and other reproduction issues beyond our control. Because this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment to protecting, preserving and promoting the world's literature.