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ISBN:0939464160
Author: Adolf von Harnack,John E. Steely,Lyle D. Bierma
ISBN13: 978-0939464166
Title: Marcion: The Gospel of the Alien God
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ePUB size: 1710 kb
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Language: English
Publisher: Labyrinth Press (April 1, 1990)
Pages: 182

Marcion: The Gospel of the Alien God by Adolf von Harnack,John E. Steely,Lyle D. Bierma



Harnack, Adolf von, 1851-1930. Uniform Title: Marcion. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Marcion : the gospel of the alien God, Adolf von Harnack ; translated by John E. Steely and Lyle D. Bierma.

Harnack's book is a great read on the subject. And if you enjoy that, be sure to check out R. Joseph Hoffman's Marcion: On the Restitution of Christianity: An Essay on the Development of Radical Paulinist Theology in the Second Century. So begins Professor Adolf Harnack's definitive work on the early church character of Marcion. Indeed, the parallels between the 16th century reformers and Marcion are many and intriguing. At times Marcion is even a model in that Professor Harnack cannot help but wonder if the reformers did not go far enough and should have completely divorced Christianity from the old testament and it's Jewish roots entirely.

a b Adolf von Harnack: Marcion: The Gospel of the Alien God (1924) translated by John E. Semler, Johann (1783). Thomas Townsons Abhandlungen über die vier Evangelien. Marcion and the New Testament: An Essay in the Early History of the Canon. Chicago: Chicago University Press. Jesus, the Gospels, and the Church: Essays in Honor of William R. Farmer. Macon: Mercer University Press.

The Gospel of Marcion, called by its adherents the Gospel of the Lord, was a text used by the mid-2nd-century Christian teacher Marcion of Sinope to the exclusion of the other gospels. So many Christian apologists wrote treatises against Marcion after his death that it has been possible to reconstruct almost the whole of Marcion's Gospel of the Lord from their quotations. Its reconstructed fragments now appear among the New Testament apocrypha. Relationship to the Gospel of Luke. Adolf von Harnack: Marcion: The Gospel of the Alien God (1924) translated by John E. Book: Semler, Johann. Johann Salomo Semler.

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Lyle D Bierma has contributed to Marcion: The Gospel of the Alien God as a translator. Duke University) is professor of systematic theology at Calvin Theological Seminary. Charles D. Gunnoe Jr. (P. University of Virginia) is associate professor of history at Aquinas College. University of St. Andrews) is director of the Meeter Center at Calvin College. Carl Gustav Adolf von Harnack (7 May 1851 – 10 June 1930) was a German Lutheran theologian and prominent church historian. He rejected the historicity of the Gospel of John in favor of the Synoptic Gospels, criticized the Apostles' Creed, and promoted the Social Gospel. Books by Adolf von Harnack.

According to Harnack, Marcion believed there could be only one true gospel, all others being fabrications by pro-Jewish elements, determined to sustain worship of Yahweh. Furthermore, he believed that the true gospel was given directly to Paul the Apostle by Christ himself, but was later corrupted by those same elements who also corrupted the Pauline epistles.

Von Harnack writes that: :"For this task he did not appeal to a divine revelation, any special instruction, nor to a pneumatic assistance From this it immediately follows that for his purifications of the text - and this is usually overlooked - he neither could claim nor did claim absolute certainty. Gospel of Saint John - Gospel of St. John † Catholic Encyclopedia Gospel of St. John This subject will be considered under the following heads: I. Contents and Scheme of the Gospel; II. Distinctive Peculiarities; III. Authorship; I.

John E. Labyrinth Press, 1990. The outlines of Harnack's landmark monograph on Marcion are well known from summaries and discussions of it as well as through the German original. But it is an event worthy of note for the work to appear in English, where the complexities and nuances of Harnack's presentation are now opened up to a wider readership. It is to be hoped that this fresh look thus provided may bring some of Harnack's neglected arguments and insights back into the contemporary discussion where they belong. Even with the regret table omission of the extensive appendices of the original, the book still offers a feast.

Reviews: 7
Narim
Paul had no more devoted pupil than Marcion, claims Harnack in this impressive monograph. Many readers may feel that some aspects of the study are very outdated, in particular Harnack accepts too much from Paul whereas more recent research would claim the opposite, that Paul's letters have been extensively reworked on by Marcion and his followers. It seems that Marcion added considerably more to Paul's letters than what he removed. Harnack had obviously not solved the problem of Paul's apparent dual theology and restricts Marcion's action to Biblical theology, devoid of any speculative theology. Harnack misses Marcion's doctrine by claiming everything speculative to be Pauline.

With these restrictions in mind, and considering that we have here a university theses from the early nineteen twenties, the amount of careful research is to be valued. Readers will find many precious references not readily found in other publications based on Tertullians' Contra-Marcion.

Although the translation from German is occasionally difficult to fully understand, the book is well worthwhile our efforts.

I would nevertheless suggest that unprepared readers should first go for more recent studies on Marcion, such as Tyson's "Marcion and Luke-Acts, a Defining Struggle, as well as Hermann Detring's "Fabricated Paul" that holds wide-open the doors to Marcion (even too wide) and gives a lively account on the extent of Christianity's debt toward heretics.
Leniga
Harnack's study of Marcion provides a critical view into the most formative period of early Christianity. Marcion, who created the first New Testament, consisting of a stripped-down version of the Gospel of Luke and 10 letters of Paul, would have made Christianity a religon of love -- rather than a mixture of judgment and grace. Harnack knew why that wouldn't ultimately work (he had written the History of [Christian] Dogma in four editions earlier), but from his earliest to his latest writing, Harnack rather wished that Marcion could have won. This was the 20th century master treatment of Marcion. Great to have it available in an inexpensive edition.
Ance
Despite the fact that this is a rather difficult read, and I'm sure there are many discoveries in research on Marcion since the time of its writing, I stuck with this book and really enjoyed it as a whole. The organization of its analysis and the clarity of explanation of the topics covered is phenomenal, whether you read it out of interest in Marcions relation to the early church and its theology and canon, or interest in Marcion in and of himself. The only other negatives are that the Appendices of the original are referenced constantly but not included in this iteration and the printing quality isn't great. The quality of the content more than makes up for these drawbacks. Thank you.
Cells
Marcion's greatest contribution is the recognition that the god depicted in the Old Testament is not the one true god, nor the Father spoken of by Jesus.

For that, he is regarded as the greatest of heretics, or the wisest of the early Christian writers, who almost single handedly put the Apostle Paul on the map.

Harnack's book is a great read on the subject. And if you enjoy that, be sure to check out R. Joseph Hoffman's Marcion: On the Restitution of Christianity: An Essay on the Development of Radical Paulinist Theology in the Second Century
Steelraven
Marcion was a controversial teacher in the early church. He rejected the Old Testament and its angry God, seeing a more loving God in the testimonies of Jesus and Paul. I have not found many books about him, especially no primary, original sources. Marcion was considered a heretic and with heretics you generally get the writings of their enemies. It is good to find a book that truly gets into Marcion's head and that tells his story.
Hra
"[T]here stood before the presbyters a man who expounded to them the difference between law and gospel and interpreted their Christianity as a Jewish kind. Who does not think here of Luther?" So begins Professor Adolf Harnack's definitive work on the early church character of Marcion. Indeed, the parallels between the 16th century reformers and Marcion are many and intriguing. And Professor Harnack, from the Protestant tradition himself, does not hesitate to praise Marcion's consistency and passion in separating law and gospel. At times Marcion is even a model in that Professor Harnack cannot help but wonder if the reformers did not go far enough and should have completely divorced Christianity from the old testament and it's Jewish roots entirely.

Despite Professor Harnack's enthusiasm for his subject (perhaps inevitable of biographers), the detailed information that the Professor was able to glean from the existing sources is still the standard background for this fascinating period in the early church. A few areas that Professor Harnack could have explored more seem to be Marcion's rejection of church Tradition is practically ignored but obvious in his rejection of the texts accepted for liturgy. Marcion's views of the Eucharist would not have meshed well with the early church fathers who used language extremely suggestive of the real presence. See for instance, Ignatius of Antioch, concerning the Docetists with whom Marcion had so much in common concerning a true presence of Jesus.

Marcion is a reminder of the results in rejecting the authority and tradition of the church in favor of one's own presuppositions ending with an interpretation (and even acceptance) of scripture based on those presuppositions. He is an important topic of the early church, the disunity he sparked led to the church defining itself further in doctrine and in the formation of a canon of scripture. This is the definitive work in the original German language. In this English form it is missing some of the source material referred to throughout the book. It is a shame that the material was left out. At points in the text Professor Harnack's style can be difficult to follow and may require re-reading but there is no text more thorough in coverage of this important topic.