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ISBN:080186688X
Author: Norman Scott Henderson
ISBN13: 978-0801866883
Title: Rediscovering the Great Plains: Journeys by Dog, Canoe, and Horse (Creating the North American Landscape)
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ePUB size: 1814 kb
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Language: English
Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (November 16, 2001)
Pages: 232

Rediscovering the Great Plains: Journeys by Dog, Canoe, and Horse (Creating the North American Landscape) by Norman Scott Henderson



Rediscovering the Great Plains: Journeys by Dog, Canoe, and Horse (Creating the North American Landscape). Dr. Norman Henderson. Download (pdf, 999 Kb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Rediscovering the Great Plains book. In this study, Norman Henderson, a scholar of the world's great temperate grasslands, revives these traditional modes of travel, journeying along 200 miles of Canada's Qu'Appelle River valley by dog and travois (the wooden rack pulled by dogs and horses used by Native Americans to transport goods), then by canoe, and finally by horse and travois.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-202) and index

In Rediscovering the Great Plains, part of a series on North American landscapes from Johns Hopkins Press, Norman Henderson tries to put himself in the minds of nomadic natives and European explorers by matching the pace and methods of their original journeys across the plains. Choosing Saskatchewan’s Qu’Appelle Valley for his experiments, he borrows a dog, recreates an Indian travois (a V of wooden poles for carrying cargo) for the dog to pull, and sets out on foot. The next summer he repeats the route by canoe, and, a year later, on a horse. Along the way, he blends passages from historical.

Rediscovering the Great Plains: Journeys by Dog,Canoe, and Horse, drawings by Robert Cook, Johns Hopkins University Press (Baltimore, MD), 2001. Contributor to scholarly journals and newspaper columns in Canada, Australia, and the United States. SIDELIGHTS: Norman S. Henderson is an environmental specialist, one of the world's leading experts on great temperate grasslands, and author of numerous journal and newspaper articles focusing primarily on the Great Plains.

In Rediscovering the Prairies, Norman Henderson, a leading scholar of the world’s great temperate grasslands, revives the earlier modes of prairie travel. He journeys along 325 kilometres of Saskatchewan’s Qu’Appelle Valley by dog and travois (the wooden rack pulled by dogs and horses used by First Nations to transport belongings), then by canoe, and finally by horse and travois. Henderson’s often humourous descriptions of his attempts to find and train a dog and a horse highlight the difficulties involved in recreating traditional travel methods. Henderson interweaves his own adventures with.

In Rediscovering the Great Plains, Norman Henderson, a leading scholar of the world's great temperate grasslands, revives these traditional modes of travel, journeying along 200 miles of Canada's Qu'Appelle River valley by dog and travois (the wooden rack pulled by dogs and horses used by Native Americans to transport goods), then by canoe, and finally by horse and travois. Henderson interweaves his own adventures with the exploits of earlier Plains travelers, like Lewis and Clark, Francisco Coronado, La Vérendrye, and Alexander Henry.

Norman Scott Henderson The North American Plains are one of the world's great landscapes. Today, the most intimate experience most of us have of the great grasslands is from behind the window of a car or train. It was not always so. In the earliest days, Plains Indians travelled on foot across the vastness, with only the fierce, wolf-like Plains dogs as companions. Henderson interweaves his own adventures with the exploits of earlier Plains travellers, like Lewis and Clark, Francisco Coronado, La Verendrye, and Alexander Henry.

In Killing Ground, John Huddleston embarks on a photographic odyssey through the modern-day landscape of the Civil War. He pairs historical images of the conflict from sixty-two battle sites across the nation- battlefield scenes, soldiers living and dead, prisoners of war, civilians, and slaves-with his own color photographs of the same locations a century and a half later, always taken at the same time of year, often at the same hour of the day. Sometimes Huddleston's lens reveals a department store or fastfood restaurant carelessly built on hallowed ground; other images depict overgrow.

The story of the Great Society Subway sheds light on the development of metropolitan Washington, postwar urban policy, and the promises and limits of rail transit in American cities. 2018-01-27 Bison and People on the North American Great Plains: A Deep Environmental History (Connecting the Greater West Series). 2017-03-10Bison and People on the North American Great Plains A Deep Environmental History. 2018-01-27 Japanese Prostitutes in the North American West, 1887-1920 (Emil and Kathleen Sick Book Series in Western History and Biography). 2018-01-09 Food in the Civil War Era: The North (American Food in History). 2018-01-08 The First Immigrants from Asia: A Population History of the North American Indians.

The North American Plains are one of the world's great landscapes―perhaps the signature landscape of the continent. Today, the most intimate experience most of us have of the great grasslands is from behind the window of a car or train. It was not always so. In the earliest days, Plains Indians traveled on foot across the vastness, with only the fierce, wolflike Plains dogs as companions. Later, with the arrival of the Europeans, horses and canoes appeared on the Plains. In Rediscovering the Great Plains, Norman Henderson, a leading scholar of the world's great temperate grasslands, revives these traditional modes of travel, journeying along 200 miles of Canada's Qu'Appelle River valley by dog and travois (the wooden rack pulled by dogs and horses used by Native Americans to transport goods), then by canoe, and finally by horse and travois.

Henderson interweaves his own adventures with the exploits of earlier Plains travelers, like Lewis and Clark, Francisco Coronado, La Vérendrye, and Alexander Henry. Lesser-known experiences of the fur traders and others who struggled to cross this strange and forbidding landscape also illuminate the story, while Henderson's often humorous description of his attempts to find and train old Plains breeds of dogs and horses highlight the difficulties involved in recreating archaic travel methods. He also draws on the history of the world's other great temperate grasslands: the South American pampas and the Eurasian steppes. Recalling the work of Ian Frazier and Jonathan Raban, Henderson's captivating account of his three journeys of exploration will foster a better appreciation for, and deeper understanding of, the natural and human history of the North American Plains.

Reviews: 2
Cyregaehus
Here's the Table of Contents:
Preface
1 - Night Vision: Of the Moonlit Plains by Train
2 - Dog: Of the Dogs of the Old Plains and of Building a Travois
3 - "Mush!": Of Plains Journeys through Heat, Snow, and Mosquitoes with a Remarkable Husky
4 - Canoe: Of the Extraordinary River Voyages of Plains Navigators
5 - "En Avant!": Of Coyotes, Cattle, and Wire, and of the Many Wonders of the Prairie River
6 - Horse: Of the "Great Gift" of the Spanish and of What-Might-Have-Been
7 - "Gee up!": Of a Final Journey in the Great Valley and of Adventures with a Philosophical Horse
8 - Day Flight:Of Home and the View from Above
Acknowledgments
Biographic Notes
Chapter Notes
References
Index

This book really struck home for me. There are so many long distance hiking, or even horseback riding, adventure-logs, but this is one of the few with a focus on history rather than heroic struggle.
Ttexav
I read library copy of 'Rediscovering The Great Plains' and knew I had to have a copy for myself. The book is so beautifully written and evokes the prairies as I know them. On every page there is something to make the reader pause, or grin, or nod in agreement. My father was born and grew up in Northern Saskatchewan, so this book helps me better grasp his early life. It will be a book I read often.