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ISBN:0941188973
Author: Ken Atchity,Marisa D'vari
ISBN13: 978-0941188975
Title: Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets
Format: mobi azw lit lrf
ePUB size: 1790 kb
FB2 size: 1755 kb
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Language: English
Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions (July 1, 2005)
Pages: 233

Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets by Ken Atchity,Marisa D'vari



Marisa D'Vari does not disappoint the reader/writer with Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets. The first chapter provides a quick, but thorough, examination of Personality Types using the author's own More Personality System(tm), the ancient Enneagram system of personality typecasting, Hippocrates' humorous philosophy, and Carl Jung's theory. If you've ever met someone and felt you'd met his type before (as is mentioned in the book), Chapter One might give you the answer as to why you felt that way. Chapter Three: How to Summon Characters from Their Magical Spheres is something to be experienced. Obviously, it's of interest to me as I'm fully into fantasy stories and movies, but this chapter is not a dance through the spring fairy rings. It's serious business.

Personal Name: D'Vari, Marisa. This new system gives you the power to capture the personality traits of each character - their mental fixations, unconcious thoughts, and defense mechanisms - to write deeper, more authentic characters. Rubrics: Motion picture authorship Characters and characteristics in literature.

Creating Characters book. Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets.

Story consultant and former studio executive D'Vari explains her trademarked system for writing and developing characters for fiction and film based on the idea that characters tend to be Movers, Observers, Relaters and Energizers. She describes the ways each personality type relates to the others, how many of each personality type differen. ISBN13:9780941188975.

Table of Contents Foreword by Ken Atchity Introduction: 3 Encouraging Characters to Whisper Their Secrets Chapter 1: 5 Creating Richer Characters Through Personality Types Chapter 2: 41 Maximizing Conflict Through Personality Types Chapter 3: 61 How to Summon Characters from Their Magical Spheres Chapter 4: 94 Techniques to Discover Your Character's Inner World Chapter 5: 110 Telegraphing Information Via a Character's. Outer World Chapter 6: 131 Coloring Dialogue Via Personality Type Chapter 7: 162 Insider Secrets to Get Past the Gatekeeper Epilogue Appendix 1 Appendix 2 Resources

by Marisa D'vari Book Views: 6. Author. Find & Download Book - Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets.

Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets. Writing the Character-Centered Screenplay. Characters, Emotion & Viewpoint. Characters & Conflict: The Cornerstones Of Screenwriting. I hope you’ll take a look. It’s the culmination of two decades of teaching and three decades as a professional TV and screenwriter. 6839/ref sr 1 1?ie UTF8&qid 1407910412&sr 8-1&keywords process+to+product+brian+herskowitz. Leave a Reply Cancel reply.

At home among the many worlds of communications, he was labeled a "story merchant" by a visiting ambassador to the United States

Subconscious Techniques to Conquer Writer's Block. Advanced Screenwriting. Raising Your Script to the Academy Award Level. Creating Unforgettable Characters. A Practical Guide to Character Development. At a glance, you will discover how to: Brainstorm and endless variety of character traits that correspond to your character's personality style. Find the right mix of personality styles for your story. Contrast personality styles to maximize conflict between characters.

Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets 12 copies. Marisa D'Vari is currently considered a "single author. If one or more works are by a distinct, homonymous authors, go ahead and split the author. Marisa D'Vari is composed of 1 name.

Fresh, invigorating, and jam-packed with solid how to advice this amazing desktop resource reveals the secrets highly paid screenwriters and best-selling novelists furiously fight to keep under wraps.
Reviews: 7
Thetalen
While this book may be useful to the novice writer or one unfamiliar with personality assessment tools, I found it more irritating than helpful and not particularly original. Ms. D'vari has adapted the Myers-Briggs, Enneagram and the DISC to create her own, very simplistic, MORE system which she uses to help the writer develop the personality traits of the imagined characters.

My biggest complaint with this book was that all of the question marks were upside down and backwards! This, along with numerous typos and/or misspelled words, indicates a lack of care in either the writer, the publisher or the editor. If you can overlook these, which I found to be more grating than nails on a chalkboard, perhaps you will discover more of interest than I did.
Dugor
Basically, what the author has done is to group the various related types in the Enneagram (or Myers-Briggs or Jung) into just 4 types and uses a scoring system to weight each one.

Movers - driven, goal-oriented 'Type A'

Observers - factual, aloof, and insecure

Relaters - romantic "people" person

Energizers - charming, flamboyant storyteller

(Hence "M.O.R.E.")

(There's a danger to this kind of oversimplification. If we were to divide up the world into, say, "Hispanic" and "Not Hispanic" it would simplify the categories, but a lot of nuances and depth of cultures would be lost. It seems to be counterproductive if depth is what you're looking for.)

I've tried using this book with my 3 main characters in my current project. And I find that by applying this methodology, they're more likely to be alike than different. There's not nearly enough on distinguishing characters *within* these 4 types once you have them. For example, let's say I have two Movers. They shouldn't be exactly alike, so how do I make them different? If she scores 27 for Mover and Relater, how do I balance those? If he scores 26 as an Observer and 22 as an Energizer, how do I factor in the latter?

After your characters are categorized, the book seems to fizzle and the discussion on M.O.R.E types appears to be over. The author gets into "channeling," character goal-setting (and not just for the story but for a lifetime), determining a character's wardrobe, and visualizing a character's "autopsy." It would seem that types would drive something like wardrobe choices and goals, but it's not even mentioned.

I was hoping for more.
Longitude Temporary
Of all the types of writing books to read, my favorites are those that deal with characters. Marisa D'Vari does not disappoint the reader/writer with Creating Characters: Let Them Whisper Their Secrets.

The first chapter provides a quick, but thorough, examination of Personality Types using the author's own More Personality System(tm), the ancient Enneagram system of personality typecasting, Hippocrates' humorous philosophy, and Carl Jung's theory. If you've ever met someone and felt you'd met his type before (as is mentioned in the book), Chapter One might give you the answer as to why you felt that way.

Chapter Three: How to Summon Characters from Their Magical Spheres is something to be experienced. Obviously, it's of interest to me as I'm fully into fantasy stories and movies, but this chapter is not a dance through the spring fairy rings. It's serious business. All writers experience that moment when a character comes to them, fully-fleshed, ready to fill the blank pages with his story. Chapter Three touches all too briefly on the subject of the collective unconscious, but makes up for it with a lesson on how to nurture your ability to let your characters come to you.

Though Chapter Three is good, Chapter Four: Techniques to Discover Your Character's Inner World, is even better. Many writers prefer to allow a character to develop while his story is being written, and often this creates problems when characters act in ways that don't work. Chapter Four helps you get past this. It also helps you with the backstory so that you not only have enough to work on, but there's enough there for others involved--i.e., actors and directors--to carry the character's personality further.

Another nice thing about this book is that it doesn't have to be read cover to cover; you can pick and choose the chapters. But once you start reading, it's hard to put down. D'Vari has an easy style that reads well. Some of the information included you already know, not because you've read it elsewhere, but because it's so logical that it falls into the category of Collective Memory. For instance, Chapter Six: Coloring Dialogue Via Personality Type is so very accurate. Yet, it offers ideas authors don't always pay attention to. One little trick she mentions is to think of an everyday question, such as "How are you?" and then have a character/personality type answer it. Not everyone is going to mutter the usual "uh, fine ..."

There are, of course, summaries and assignments at the end of chapters. Even if you're someone who doesn't like to do the exercises or assignments in a writing book, don't skim over these pages. Be sure to read them. D'Vari has worded her assignments in such a way that they get you thinking about your characters. Even when you've put the book down, the questions prick at you until you have to give them more time.

Just when you think you've read all you can read about coming up with characters to people your stories, a book comes out to let you know there actually is more information out there.