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ISBN:0330375288
Author: Alexander Frater
ISBN13: 978-0330375283
Title: Tales from the Torrid Zone: Travels in the Deep Tropics
Format: azw mbr lit docx
ePUB size: 1377 kb
FB2 size: 1801 kb
DJVU size: 1763 kb
Language: English
Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Publisher: Picador; Unabridged edition edition (May 21, 2004)
Pages: 400

Tales from the Torrid Zone: Travels in the Deep Tropics by Alexander Frater



Personal Name: Frater, Alexander, 1937-. Varying Form of Title: Travels in the deep tropics. Publication, Distribution, et. London Includes bibliographical references (p. 379-380). Personal Name: Frater, Alexander, 1937- Travel. Geographic Name: Tropics Description and travel. Geographic Name: Tropics Social life and customs. Geographic Name: Tropics Social conditions. Rubrics: Voyages and travels. 95 Author: Gibbons, Gail.

When my husband bought his book, Tales from the Torrid Zone, 2nd hand for me I didn’t know what to expect but feeling like a change after reading about the Arab world, I decided to try it. The Tropics are fascinating and it seems that Frater is perfectly placed to write about them because he was born in Iririki, Vanuatu and spent his journalistic life travelling to and writing about the tropics. Fra I must admit that despite being a big fan of travel writing I had never heard of Alexander Frater. Grandson of a Scottish Presbyterian minister who was the first Frater to travel into the deep tropics, and son to parents that set up both hospitals and schools there, Alexander retraces his family's roots in the region. Surprisingly to the author, the locals still remember his missionary grandfather with great fondness and gratitude, though the still running church is in need of a new bell.

Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Tales from the torrid zone : travels in the deep tropics Alexander Frater. Book's title: Tales from the torrid zone : travels in the deep tropics Alexander Frater. Library of Congress Control Number: 2006049552.

But, as becomes plain, the torrid zone is not just a geographical phenomenon, it’s also a state of mind. The result is a witty, entertaining and immensely readable book from a fine storyteller. ru - Part memoir, part travelogue, Tales From the Torrid Zone is rooted in Alex Frater's birthplace, the tiny tropical republic of Vanuatu where his father ran its hospital and his mother, in her front garden, built its first school. from the Torrid Zone.

Travels in the Deep Tropics. The Washington Times - Ann Geracimos. Alexander Frater's Tales from the Torrid Zone is a book to treasure on many levels. The wealth of knowledge revealed on its pages scientific, sociological, geographical, linguistic and more plus the astounding mix of characters and incidents, should put this volume at the top of any list for those interested in making a thorough exploration of the author's special world Be prepared to be fascinated and frustrated. Boston Globe - Barbara Fisher. Alexander Frater has contributed to various UK publications and, as chief travel correspondent for the Observer newspaper, has won an unprecedented number of British Press Travel Awards. Miles Kington calls him 'the funniest man who wrote for Punch since the war'.

Frater made several television documentaries, but admits in Tales from the Torrid Zone that his career in front of a camera was destined to be short lived. A BBC and ABC Discovery Series documentary recreating Africa's flying boat journeys from Cairo to Mozambique was filmed in difficult conditions in 1989 aboard a Catalina flying boat. Tales from the Torrid Zone: Travels in the Deep Tropics. London: Pan Macmillan.

beautifully written book. Library Journal Tales from the Torrid Zone jagged edge of authenticity. Part memoir, part travel yarn, a hymn to the solar lands where people ‘wear their shadows like shoes’. The structure of Frater's book is built around his birth to a missionary family in the South Pacific, the love of the tropics that never left him despite many years in rainy England, and his purchase of a new bell for the church founded by his grandfather. A long time travel writer for a British newspaper, Frater has many good stories to tell, and they surface in this book in strange ways; a moment in, say, Fiji, wil remind him of a previous moment, in Mozambique for example, which will remind him of yet another story.

Alexander Frater, son of a Scottish Presbyterian missionary couple (and grandson of one of the first European missionaries to many of the islands in Melanesia), was born on the small island of Irikiki and flitted around the tropics for many of his early, formative years. He later relocated to the UK, where he became travel correspondent for an award-winning British newspaper, The Observer. Frater’s writing is of the highest quality. Perhaps his most endearing literary trait is his ability to capture interesting dialogue. On his travels, he seems to unabashedly mix with anyone and everyone, and is evidently an attentive listener. He relates countless stories told to him by a wide variety of characters he meets - indigenous locals, other travelers, and ex-pats putting down roots in some tropical clime.

Alexander Frater was born to a family of Scottish expatriates on the tiny island of Irikiki in the South Seas. Part memoir, part travelogue, all passionate appreciation,Tales from the Torrid Zonebegins in Iririki, Alexander Frater's birthplace.

His travels take him to nearly all of the eighty-eight countries encompassed by this remarkable, steamy swath of the world. He delves deeply into the history and politics of each nation he visits, and into the lives of the inhabitants, and of the flora and fauna. He is, at once, tourist, explorer and adventurer, as fascinated with-and fascinating about-the quotidian as he is with the extraordinary. Part memoir, part travelogue, Tales From the Torrid Zone is rooted in his birthplace, the tiny tropical republic of Vanuatu, where Alexander Frater's father ran the hospital and his mother, in her front garden, built the first school.

Part memoir, part travelogue, Tales From the Torrid Zone is rooted in his birthplace, the tiny tropical republic of Vanuatu where his father ran its hospital and his mother, in her front garden, built its first school. From this obscure South Seas group he ranges over the hot, wet, beautiful swathe of the world that has haunted him ever since - dines with a tropical queen in a leper colony, makes his way across tropical Africa (and two civil wars) in a forty-four-year-old flying boat, delivers a new church bell to a remote Oceanian island and visits scores of countries to learn about their history, politics, medicine, flora and fauna (including the remarkable role of the coconut in tropical life). But, as becomes plain, the torrid zone is not just a geographical phenomenon, it's also a state of mind. The result is a witty, entertaining and immensely readable book from a fine storyteller.Part memoir, part travelogue, Tales From the Torrid Zone is rooted in Alex Frater's birthplace, the tiny tropical republic of Vanuatu where his father ran its hospital and his mother, in her front garden, built its first school. From this obscure South Seas group he ranges over the hot, wet, beautiful swathe of the world that has haunted him ever since - dines with a tropical queen in a leper colony, makes his way across tropical Africa (and two civil wars) in a forty-four-year-old flying boat, delivers a new church bell to a remote Oceanian island and visits scores of countries to learn about their history, politics, medicine, flora and fauna (including the remarkable role of the coconut in tropical life). But, as becomes plain, the torrid zone is not just a geographical phenomenon, it's also a state of mind. The result is a witty, entertaining and immensely readable book from a fine storyteller.
Reviews: 7
IGOT
If you've ever hung out in bars or pubs, you'll recognize the type---full of stories, knows everyone and their cousin too, seems too raffishly quaint to be true. And probably is. If there's such a thing as a chain smoker, there's also a chain raconteur. Frater starts another story before finishing the first; like one of those Chinese boxes inside boxes all made from one piece of ivory, his tales lie in the belly of another. I have to say his writing is not unpleasant. It may keep your interest, but I developed a serious case of doubt. I like to know if I'm reading fact or fiction, but I couldn't quite find the line here. I know very little about Vanuatu, a Pacific island nation where Frater's family lived in colonial days. I couldn't judge the truth of what he said. But when I did know something about the subject, the book played very lightly with the facts, to be kind.

Muhammad changed his tune---30 years after he'd died ! When the Chinese arrived in Japan, there was no Shogun and no Zen Buddhism. Bartolome de las Casas was entirely different from what we read here. The story of Ishii, the last of his California tribe, is attributed to Levi-Strauss. The `rial' was never a Brazilian currency. Portugal never controlled half the world, though it did a good job on a series of forts and ports from Lisbon to Timor. Did any Brazilian governor ever flatten a million square miles of forest ? He writes of a Malagasy king with a very long name deposed by the French---but they deposed a queen! Did the Seychelles have a team at the 1924 Olympics ? Were there ever leopards in Zanzibar ? And dude ! I'm only scratching the surface here.

All right, TALES FROM THE TORRID ZONE may be entertaining. We can quote the author who says he's writing "a series of vignettes, fastidiously, almost lovingly choreographed" (p.95) Maybe they actually happened too. You can read 26 pages about the epic voyage of Ferdinand Quiros, there's a good section about a boat trip down the Irrawady in Burma, and a trip by flying boat across Africa to Mozambique at the time of its civil war. The foreigners he meets (wow ! you actually do meet some besides the Anglo-American chappies) all have similar accents in English. They all drop their articles. That's a laugh. At last I felt that this book had been bunged together and the author was relying on charm to see him through. If you read it, you'll judge whether that is enough.
Cktiell
The structure of Frater's book is built around his birth to a missionary family in the South Pacific, the love of the tropics that never left him despite many years in rainy England, and his purchase of a new bell for the church founded by his grandfather. A long time travel writer for a British newspaper, Frater has many good stories to tell, and they surface in this book in strange ways; a moment in, say, Fiji, wil remind him of a previous moment, in Mozambique for example, which will remind him of yet another story. Although this is certainly a change from itinerary-based travel writing, I would have liked to at least have footnotes saying when exactly a set of events took place. I often had to re-read paragraphs and sections after I realized that he was in Vanuatu, reminiscing about someplace like Burma.
Modifyn
Somehow this book simply didn't appeal to me. It meanders all over the place, with no dates so you're often left to guess the chronology. Occasional reminiscences about bygone missionaries, their wives, church bells and so on. Not a travel book by any means. Although to be fair, the parts about flying boats and tropical diseases were quite interesting. If you are interested in the South Pacific, I'd reccomend as light fare "The Sex Lives of Cannibals: Adrift in the Equatorial Pacific" by J. Maarten Troost and the best I've ever read "The Fatal Impact: The Invasion of the South Pacific, 1767-1840"
Blacknight
My first reaction to Frater's "Tales" was mildly negative. He offers digressions within digressions, often jump cutting from place to place with only the mildest narrative logic. After a while, though, I adjusted to the pace and style and became thoroughly engrossed with his account of a life-long passion for the tropics. The book is filled with interesting detail, and thoughtful musings on a wide variety of subjects. I would love to travel with Frater, and reading this book is the next best thing.
Reggy
This is my kind of book.
Abywis
unparalleled travel writing...
Thomeena
Tales from the Torrid Zone is an eclectic series of yarns than span the centuries before the voyages of Ferdinand Quiros to the late 1990s and circle the equator. Its focus is however mainly in the Pacific and builds upon the childhood experiences of the author to provide insights into the history of the myriad of islands that support as many cultures. Although offspring of Presbyterian missionaries/doctors he approaches the impact of this unsympathetic facet of European culture with an unbiased eye that celebrates the resilience of islanders as much as it reveals his own inevitable ties with the places of his youth. Built around the story of a church bell the author's humorous stories and reflections take a few chapters to pull you in, but by the second half of the book the storytelling, interspersed with anecdotal paragraphs, will keep you absorbed and fill you with regret when the last page is read. This book was a great companion for my daily winter commute. Dipping into its storyline bathed my body in tropical warmth and left me debating about an afternoon siesta in my office (with the door closed). This author is on my hit list for other titles.