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ISBN:1931498784
Author: Derrick Jensen
ISBN13: 978-1931498784
Title: Walking on Water: Reading, Writing and Revolution
Format: lit mbr mobi docx
ePUB size: 1427 kb
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Language: English
Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing (April 30, 2005)
Pages: 232

Walking on Water: Reading, Writing and Revolution by Derrick Jensen



Walking on Water book. Walking On Water is primarily about Jensen's experiences as a writer and writing instructor at a prison and a university in Washington state. Those experiences are really only the frame, though, in which he presents his criticisms of the American educational system, where Jensen says we are trained to submit ourselves to a society that turns us into slaves and masters. This book is what I wished Lies My Teacher Told Me would have been.

Read free excerpts from Derrick Jensen's Walking on Water, a startling and provocative look at teaching, writing, creativity, & life in modern civilization. This is Jensen’s great gift as a teacher and writer, to bring us fully alive at the same moment he is making us confront our losses and count our defeats. It is at the center of Walking on Water, a book that is not only a hard-hitting and sometimes scathing critique of our current educational system; not only a hands-on method for learning how to write; but, like Julia Cameron’s book, The Artist’s Way, a lesson on how to connect to the core of our creative selves, to the. miracle of waking up and arriving breathless (but with dry feet) on the far shore. The clarity and force of these.

Personal Name: Jensen, Derrick, 1960-. Publication, Distribution, et. White River Junction, Vt. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Walking on water : reading, writing, and revolution, Derrick Jensen.

Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Walking On Water: Reading, Writing And Revolution. It is at the center of Walking on Water, a book that is not only a hard-hitting and sometimes scathing critique of our current educational system and not only a hands-on method for learning how to write, but, like Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way, a lesson on how to connect to the core of our creative selves, to the.

Walking on Water is a startling and provocative look at teaching, writing, creativity, and life by a writer increasingly recognized for his passionate and articulate critique of modern civilization. Walking on Water - then writing about it. By Thriftbooks. com User, March 4, 2004. Well! Eco-William seems to have summed up all of Walking on Water very nicely. I so desperately would like to toss this book to a few people I have passed by in life that have felt they were somehow wrong in their.

Walking on Water: Reading, Writing and Revolution. Dueling book cover. ay the best design win! Start Voting.

He writes for The New York Times Magazine, Audubon, and The Sun Magazine among many others.

Throughout this book Jensen includes several useful writing tips that offer a unique twist to this book: while a significant diatribe against historical approaches to education, it provides useful methods for self-education and learning through life. Ultimately Jensen achieves Freire’s challenge of sharing with students the goal of reading the word through the world, and in that is Jensen’s greatest success. Thank you, Derrick Jensen, for giving us a roadway to get started. Title: Walking on Water: Reading, Writing, and Revolution. Author: Derrick Jensen. Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing Company (2004).

Walking on Water can be read as a manifesto, but it can also be read as a collection of real stories, a testament to the power of stories. So a manifesto, but fun as well as inspiring. If you write or wish you were writing, you’ll probably appreciate Jensen’s book. If you teach, I bet you’ll find something valuable in Walking on Water. If you never write anything, or never teach anyone anythin. hy not? Jensen asks great questions, tells good stories, and pushes folks outside their comfort zones: Who are you? Who are you, really?

Remember the days of longing for the hands on the classroom clock to move faster? Most of us would say we love to learn, but we hated school. Why is that? What happens to creativity and individuality as we pass through the educational system?

Walking on Water is a startling and provocative look at teaching, writing, creativity, and life by a writer increasingly recognized for his passionate and articulate critique of modern civilization. This time Derrick Jensen brings us into his classroom--whether college or maximum security prison--where he teaches writing. He reveals how schools perpetuate the great illusion that happiness lies outside of ourselves and that learning to please and submit to those in power makes us into lifelong clock-watchers. As a writing teacher Jensen guides his students out of the confines of traditional education to find their own voices, freedom, and creativity.

Jensen's great gift as a teacher and writer is to bring us fully alive at the same moment he is making us confront our losses and count our defeats. It is at the center of Walking on Water, a book that is not only a hard-hitting and sometimes scathing critique of our current educational system and not only a hands-on method for learning how to write, but, like Julia Cameron's The Artist's Way, a lesson on how to connect to the core of our creative selves, to the miracle of waking up and arriving breathless (but with dry feet) on the far shore.

Reviews: 7
Walianirv
Book Review: Walking on Water by Derrick Jensen

Derrick Jensen teaches writing at Eastern Washington University and a high security prison. He invites us into his coaching mind and classrooms. I missed at first that it was really a college level class, thinking he was addressing a group of high school kids or dropouts. It quickly becomes apparent however, that some language or comments could be inappropriate for certain of these groups. I do not mind so much the expression he employs, more to the point and very simply, the style will probably only be relevant to particular audiences. His passion challenges the boredom one encounters at school with entertainment and wit. I am no longer in the school system he criticizes, not in jail either, not bored, and I have self-motivation. Can I still be interested in reading this book? Jensen covers a wide range of subjects that do not exactly fall within the rubrics of READING, WRITING, AND REVOLUTION, as indicated by the subtitle.

His main contention is with the traditional education system. True, this system can be stifling. However, is it really why there is such a level of illiteracy in American schools and universities? Traditional education in other industrialized nations is perhaps just as stifling, and probably even more so in some instances. But with less recreation and sports and more instructional hours, the level of literacy is higher. I also speak from experience since I am an educator working in a public university system in the U. S. and consider as alarming the current level of remedial help needed. Data evidence shows a clear decline in literacy in the last decade. From this standpoint, if Jensen’s quirkiness and spirit can motivate a creative form of learning, we need more people like him.

Most of us I believe can remember long hours in school, bored, and just waiting for recess. Here Jensen’s investigations are absolutely relevant: “What else did I learn? I learned to not talk out of order, and to not question authority—not openly, at least—for fear of losing recess time, or later of losing grade points. I learned to not ask difficult questions of overburdened or impatient teachers, and certainly not to expect thoughtful answers. I learned to mimic the opinions of teachers, and on command to vomit facts and interpretations of those facts gleaned from textbooks, whether I agreed with the facts or interpretations or not.”

These few lines trigger some memories of my own; learning facts, lots of facts, learning by rote instead of developing critical thinking skills. I recognize how this applies at all levels of study, and how one needs to stay critical of one’s learning processes.

“I learned how to read authority figures, give them what they wanted, to fawn and brownnose when expedient. In short, I learned to give myself away.” Is there any possibility that we may do this as well in other areas of our life, beyond school? Giving ourselves away just like that? How vigilant are we? Could my own contributions lean in a particular direction, follow a particular opinion, just to satisfy what I think is expected? I believe this can be continually examined in one’s work, one’s writing, whatever creative pursuit one is engaged in. Vigilance can be invited in this manner throughout one’s life. It also questions how one is committed to developing a life of personal meaning and support the unfolding of an authentic voice. From this standpoint, I find Jensen’s questioning to be relevant beyond what I thought was directed to a particular audience needing “rehabilitation.”

“We hear, more or less constantly, that schools are failing in their mandate. Nothing could be more wrong. Schools are succeeding all too well, accomplishing precisely their purpose. And what is their primary purpose? To answer this, ask yourself first what society values most. We don’t talk about it much, but the truth is that our society values money above all else, in part because it represents power, and in part because, as is also true of power, it gives us the illusion that we can get what we want. But one of the costs of following money is that in order to acquire it, we so often have to give ourselves away to whomever has money to give in return. Bosses, corporations, men with nice cars, women with power suits. Teachers.”

What society values most is money, Jensen writes. He points to schools preparing minds, from a very young age, to become the future earners, the cogs in the big money machine. This perspective creates some discomfort for sure as there is more to life than just harvesting achievement through money. We do read that liberal education is fast disappearing. Education concedes knowledge and the development of critical abilities, to money which becomes its directive agent, and primary purpose.

The author asks his students, if they were given a million dollars, would they stay in school. They want a little more than a million, but even with that, most of them answer they would leave. They would have better things to do with their life. Similarly, if people who work in my college department were given a million dollars, would they remain in their current position? I do not believe they would.

What is wrong with this picture? Traditional education can be blamed for failing to meet the creativity and liveliness students need. Similarly, the traditional workplace continues in the same vein, falling short to satisfy basic human needs: feeling valued, having a sense of purpose, worthiness, and making a contribution.

Jensen’s book raises ideas that make one think. It is a mixed bag at times, even longwinded, as I caught myself skimming entire pages or sections. However, we witness a creative mind hooking the interest of his students, at times breaking into their psyche in whichever way he can, all of it meant to inspire and give confidence.

Derrick Jensen has written a number of other books: A Language Older than Words, The Culture of Make Believe, Listening to the Land, Strangely Like War, Welcome to the Machine, and Walking on Water. He also writes for The New York Times Magazine, Audubon, and The Sun Magazine among many others.
jorik
What does the question, "Who am I?" have to do with learning? According to Derrick Jensen, "the only real job of any teacher is to help students find themselves." Using classroom anecdotes in his experience teaching young adults and inmates, reflective prose, bold political commentary, and humorous yet compassionate insights about what it is to be human, Jensen illustrates how self-discovery awakens our inner knowing and ignites the learning process.

Jensen is a skillful storyteller and harsh critic of "industrial education" in which teachers seat their students in neat rows and deliver information that will later be regurgitated, and of modern civilization which, in an analogous manner, seeks to cultivate citizens who fulfill their role dutifully and do what they're told. In Jensen's classroom, however, questioning authority, showing up authentically, exploring creativity and demonstrating respect for self and others are essential; grades, obedience, and "getting the right answers" are not.

"Walking on Water," is not a "how to" guide for teachers, nor, as he admits, is his approach right for everyone. Ultimately this book is a graceful yet urgent call for us all to wake up, think for ourselves, and passionately dedicate our lives to what is meaningful. Similar to Edward Abby's "Desert Solitaire," Jensen reminds us that our planet is in danger and time is short. "In this deathly culture the most revolutionary thing anyone can do is follow one's heart" and guide others to do the same.
Voodoosida
Another amazing book, or should I say manifesto, from our modern-day Thoreau. An investigation into American industrial civilization and education, and the repercussions thereof. Of the many highlights I could share, here are a few:

"Here is what I do know: I hate industrial civilization, for what it does to the planet, for what it does to communities, for what it does to individual nonhumans (both wild and domesticated), and for what it does to individual humans (both wild and domesticated). I hate the wage economy, because it causes - forces is probably more accurate - people to sell their lives doing things they do not love, and because it rewards people for harming each other and destroying their landbases. I hate industrial schooling because it commits one of the only unforgivable sins there is: it leads people away from themselves, training them to be workers and convincing them it's in their best interest to be ever more loyal slaves, rowing the galley that is industrial civilization ever more fervently - enthusiastically, orgiastically - to hell, compelling them to take everything and everyone they encounter down with them. And I participate in the process. I help make school a little more palatable, a little more fun, as students are trained to do their part in the ongoing destruction of the planet, as they enter the final phases of trading away their birthright as the free and happy humans they were born to be for their roles as cogs in the giant industrial machine, or worse, as overseers of the giant factory/enslavement camp we once recognized as a living earth. Doesn't that make me, in essence, a collaborator? Hell, drop the in essence."
- Derrick Jensen -

"Mathematics, science, economics, history, religion, are all just as deeply and necessarily political. To believe they're not - to believe, for example, that science (or mathematics, economics, history, religion, and so forth: choose your poison) describes the world as it is, rather than acting as a filter that removes all information that does not fit the model and colors the information that remains - is in itself to take a position, one that is all the more powerful and dangerous because it is invisible to the one who holds it."
- Derrick Jensen -