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Download Gone to Amerikay epub book
ISBN:1401223516
Author: Jose Villarrubia,Derek McCulloch
ISBN13: 978-1401223519
Title: Gone to Amerikay
Format: azw doc txt mobi
ePUB size: 1780 kb
FB2 size: 1380 kb
DJVU size: 1816 kb
Language: English
Category: Writing Research and Publishing Guides
Publisher: Vertigo; No Additional Printings Listed edition (April 3, 2012)
Pages: 144

Gone to Amerikay by Jose Villarrubia,Derek McCulloch



Gone to Amerikay is a wonderful book to look through. The art by Colleen Doran (creator of the extensive fantasy series A Distant Soil) is exquisite-there is simply no other word for it. The colours added by José Villarrubia couldn’t be improved on. So, for lovers of graphic arts, this book is worth having for that reason alone. The author is Derek McCulloch who has not compromised on content to appeal to young readers.

Genres: Supernatural. Publisher: DC Comics. Writer: Derek McCulloch. Artist: Colleen Doran. Publication date: May 2012. Written by Eisner Award-nominated writer Derek McCulloch (Stagger Lee, Pug), and beautifully illustrated with period detail by Colleen Doran (THE SANDMAN, ORBITER) and color by Jose Villarrubia. TPB. From 2015 ReadComicOnline.

Other authors: Colleen Doran (Illustrator), Jared K. Fletcher (Illustrator), Jose Villarrubia (Illustrator). Weaving three generations of storyline together, Gone to Amerikay showcases the lives of Irish immigrants in New York City. Beautifully illustrated, it is a funky mash-up of ghost story, history lesson and romance. Personally, I would have liked a glossary of Gaelic words, and the use of historical clippings to strengthen the historic aspects and shed light on the named historic figures.

Featured Characters: Supporting Characters: Antagonists: Other Characters: Locations: Items: Vehicles: Synopsis not yet written. Categories: Comics Published by Vertigo. Colleen Doran/Cover Artist. José Villarrubia/Cover Artist. Derek McCulloch/Writer. Colleen Doran/Penciler.

McCulloch ties it all together in 2010, where we learn the way Lewis is connected to Johnny and the way Johnny is connected to Ciara. I Strongly Recommend Gone to Amerikay, if you must know. It has two very nice love stories, an interesting mystery, and while I don't think it's as important in describing the "immigrant experience" as the pull quotes on the back do, I do think it's a good view of America over the centuries and the way people relate to each other in the United States.

Roderick McCullough, Derek McCulloch, Colleen Doran, José Villarrubia.

book by Derek McCulloch. This sweeping, century-spanning graphic novel explores the vivid history of Irish migrs to New York City via three intertwined tales, from a penniless woman raising a daughter alone in the Five Points slum of 1870, to a struggling young artist drawn to the nascent counterculture of 1960, the year America elected its first Irish-Catholic president.

Apple iBooksCheck Availability Check Availability. Barnes and NobleCheck Availability Check Availability. comiXologyCheck Availability Check Availability. Derek McCulloch (Stagger Lee, Pug), and beautifully illustrated with period detail by Colleen Doran (THE SANDMAN, ORBITER) and color by Jose Villarrubia. Colorist Jose Villarrubia, Colleen Doran. Cover Color by: Jose Villarrubia. Finisher Colleen Doran. Layout Colleen Doran. Letterer Jared K Fletcher.

to amerikay mcculloch doran villarrubia novels comics. Jiro Bourdain Rose Foss Villarrubia books .Tooth Lemire Villarrubia Brosseau.

Gone to Amerikay is a graphic novel set in three time periods, telling three, seemingly independent stories. José Villarrubia’s colours are stunning, as detailed and evocative as Doran’s art, complementing it to give the reader a fully-realised recreation of three different periods of New York. McCulloch’s writing is dense and rewards multiple readings. The whole book has a careful structure, with numerous references to historical characters and events, as well as prominent use of Irish folk songs (see here for references by the writer)

Ciara O'Dwyer is a young woman raising a daughter alone in the Five Points slums of 1870; Johnny McCormack is a struggling actor drawn to the nascent folk music movement in Greenwich Village 1960; and Lewis Healy is a successful Irishman who's come to present-day Manhattan on his wife's anniversary-present promise to reveal the connection between him and them. The mystery originates with Ciara's runaway husband, who disappeared after promising to join her in America, and carries into midcentury when Johnny, devastated by an unexpected romance and a lost shot at musical fame, gets a supernatural visitor
Reviews: 7
Pryl
This is a graphic novel about Irish immigrants to America told in three parallel time-streams 1870, 1960 and 2010. Gone to Amerikay is a wonderful book to look through. The art by Colleen Doran (creator of the extensive fantasy series A Distant Soil) is exquisite—there is simply no other word for it. The colours added by José Villarrubia couldn’t be improved on. So, for lovers of graphic arts, this book is worth having for that reason alone. Five stars for that.

The author is Derek McCulloch who has not compromised on content to appeal to young readers. This is adult fare in language and content but not overly crude or gruesome. Homosexuality, murder and criminality—including the involvement of a wealthy Jewess—are important story elements. But there is a lot of sensitivity and sentimentality. Lots of song lyrics, some might say too many but the theme of the book revolves around singing, and one song in particular. McCulloch ties the three time-streams together with a ghostly supernatural interlude which I felt ambivalent about. Up to that point I admired the realism the author was portraying and that this was compromised by the incursion of the supernatural. Personally I wish he had found a different way to conclude the book. I would give three and a half stars for the story but with my bias for the outstanding artistic production I have given the book five stars.
Envias
Lovingly crafted by writer Derek McCulloch and artist Colleen Doran, Gone to Amerikay details the experience of the Irish immigrant to America across three time periods. From the struggles and shattered dreams of 1870, the prejudice and exploitation of 1960, to the bright horizons of 2010, a tale is woven, part history, part mystery with just a hint of the supernatural. And, be sure, the Irish love of song is not forgotten: music almost becomes a character in its own right. This is a book that deserves a soundtrack.

McCulloch writes with a deftness of touch that staggers, providing each character with a distinctive voice and strong motivation. These characters get under your skin, their quiet strength in the face of adversity stays with you long after you've put the book down. And, although the stories in the three periods seem separate at first, the author neatly ties everything together at the end.

Doran's art has never been better. Each page is a mini-masterpiece of story-telling brilliance, and the eye-popping detail brings each period to life in a way that's never confusing for the reader. It's often the small incidents she shows in the background that impress most, especially the antics of the children. Doran has always had great felicity in her depiction of the young, and the relationship between Ciara and Maire O'Dwyer, as shown in the pitch perfect body language, will tear your heart out. A word of praise too must go to José Villarrubia, whose subtle colors -- he uses a different palette for each time period -- add immeasurably to the art's overall success.

A simply beautiful book.
Liarienen
This is one of those books where after you read it you sit back and think about it, and try to put it all together. It doesn't go away after you close the back cover. You pick it up again a little later and reread it, and the little things you missed the first time you catch on the second, and so on. This is a two dimensional world built so three dimensionally that you fall into it in the beginning and don't fall back out till the end, despite the seemingly haphazard, nonlinear story progression. There's three narratives woven back and forth across three lives and three centuries, bound together by the music of a people and a shared dream of a better life. There's a method to the madness.

I compared it to Watchmen to a friend, who said "but there's no superheroes in it." No, there aren't. That's not what I meant. I meant that I can still to this day reread Watchmen and find something I missed the previous 37 times I read it. And like that book, "Gone To Amerikay" has so many layers so skillfully interconnected I can't even begin to parse them all.

I think this book will be recognized as one of those benchmark books, a standard for others to aspire to, where the story and the art not only compliment each other, each individually displays the creator (Derek McCulloch, Colleen Doran) at peak performance; neither overshadows the other. It's a perfect fit.

I think I'm going to go read it again.
zzzachibis
In 1870, 1960 and 2010, three different people come to America for three different reasons, but their stories are destined to intertwine in this excellent graphic novel. Derek McCulloch, who's already shown his ability to intertwine storylines to good effect in his award-winning Stagger Lee, tops himself in this look at the Irish in America through many different eyes; he captures what it's like to be an outsider in an unwelcome land. And Colleen Doran's art, saturated in period detail and Jose Villarrubia's great color work, has never looked better. Recommended.
Erienan
This is a beautifully drawn graphic novel that recounts the tale of an Irish mother and her young daughter who leave for New York in 1870 to stay with an cousin while waiting for her husband to follow. However the book also tells the story of a young man from Ireland who sails for New York in 1960 and becomes involved in the Greenwich Village arts scene of off-Broadway plays, coffee houses, and folk music. And, yes, there is a third story of a wealthy Irishman whose wife, as a present her husband, tracks down a mystery involving the 1870's mother and the 1960's lad.

Disconcertingly at first, the novel as it progresses switches between these three stories about Irish people in New York. You the reader can see them eventually merging, but it left me a bit confused at first. The stories are richly rewarding and worth any trouble the sudden changes in settings may cause.

The artist excels at portraits of his characters both visually and in character development. I fell in love with the good heroes and even the villains of this richly rewarding portrait of the immigrant experience.