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ISBN:1603584250
Author: Madeleine Kunin
ISBN13: 978-1603584258
Title: The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family
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Language: English
Category: Womens Studies
Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing (April 23, 2012)
Pages: 304

The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family by Madeleine Kunin



In this important new book, Madeleine Kunin argues that empowering women to succeed at home and at work is both good economics and good social policy. She presents a convincing roadmap for how we achieve that vision, and calls on all of us to be part of a brighter future. -President Bill Clinton. Must sheepishly admit that I almost passed on The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family as being just another one of those strident and angry books that says nothing new, yet has the endorsement from every pandering politician who wants to get the female vote. 1. Time for a Pro-Family Revolution 2. How different are work/family policies in the United States from the Nordic Countries? 3. How different is the United States from England, Australia and Canada and the rest of the world?

Book Info: leave, and equal pay for equal work remain elusive for the vast majority of working women. In fact, the nation has fallen far behind other parts of the world on the gender-equity front. We lag behind more than seventy countries when it comes to the percentage of women holding elected federal offices. Only 17 percent of corporate boards include women. Sorry! Have not added any format description on The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family! download this book right now! 12115.

Time for a new revolution Back to the family, after all What can we learn from the rest of the world? What can we learn from similar nations: England, Australia, and Canada? American exceptionalism, political divisions, and the states Win/win: workplace flexibility The early years: child care and early education New family portraits How women leaders make a difference What women need to create equal opportunities in the workplace Building a coalition Child poverty How do we win? . ISBN: 0226098214 (pbk. : alk. paper) Author: Cavell, Stanley, 1926- Publication & Distribution: Chicago.

288 pages ; 23 cm. Feminists opened up thousands of doors in the 1960s and 1970s, but decades later, are . women where they thought they would be? The answer, it turns out, is a resounding no. Surely there have been gains. Women now comprise nearly 60 percent of college undergraduates and half of all medical and law students. They have entered the workforce in record numbers, making the two wage earner family the norm. But combining a career and family turned out to be more complicated than expected. While women changed, social structures surrounding work and family remained static.

Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family by Madeleine M. Kunin published APRIL 4, 2012. In this important new book,Madeleine Kunin argues that empowering women to succed at home and at work is both good economics and good social policy. President Bill Clinton. For Women Trying to Do it All, a New Revolution Feminists opened up thousands of doors in the 1960s and 1970s, but decades later, are . women where they thought they'd be? The answer, it turns out, is a resounding no. They have entered the workforce in record numbers, making the two-wage-earner family the norm.

Briayna said: I loved this book more than I thought I would  . Affordable and high-quality child care, paid family leave, and equal pay for equal work remain elusive for the vast majority of working women. Only 17 percent of corporate boards include women members. And just 5 percent of Fortune 500 companies are led by women. It's time, says Madeleine M. Kunin,.

The new feminist agenda. Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family. By Madeleine M. Kunin. 288 pp. Chelsea Green Publishing. Continue reading the main story. campaign: NonsUSGMstUpfrontAssetsNYT52018-01-03-ongoing - 12268515198, creative: Growl, source: optimizely, creator: AS. 4 ARTICLES REMAINING.

She is currently James Marsh Professor-at-Large at the University of Vermont, where she gives guest lectures on feminism and women and politics.

Feminists opened up thousands of doors in the 1960s and 1970s, but decades later, are .

Feminists opened up thousands of doors in the 1960s and 1970s, but decades later, are U.S. women where they thought they'd be? The answer, it turns out, is a resounding no. Surely there have been gains. Women now comprise nearly 60 percent of college undergraduates and half of all medical and law students. They have entered the workforce in record numbers, making the two-wage-earner family the norm. But combining a career and family turned out to be more complicated than expected. While women changed, social structures surrounding work and family remained static. Affordable and high-quality child care, paid family leave, and equal pay for equal work remain elusive for the vast majority of working women. In fact, the nation has fallen far behind other parts of the world on the gender-equity front. We lag behind more than seventy countries when it comes to the percentage of women holding elected federal offices. Only 17 percent of corporate boards include women members. And just 5 percent of Fortune 500 companies are led by women.

It's time, says Madeleine M. Kunin, to change all that. Looking back over five decades of advocacy, she analyzes where progress stalled, looks at the successes of other countries, and charts the course for the next feminist revolution--one that mobilizes women, and men, to call for the kind of government and workplace policies that can improve the lives of women and strengthen their families.

Reviews: 7
Jorius
I will use these ideas in a Forum called Feminism, the Unfinished Revolution.
Her ideas are useable for the next wave of activists.
Doomwarden
Feminism has become such a loaded word. Detractors like to paint feminists as man-haters who want to subjugate anyone whose chromosomes aren't XX. Young, influential stars and singers don't want to declare themselves feminists because they fear losing fans. I've always found this upsetting because the real goal of feminism is to achieve gender parity, a world in which the words, "She's pretty good, for a woman..." are never spoken, where women enjoy the exact same rights as men. What's long surprised me is that gender parity would be beneficial not just for women, but also for men. But those who have a vested interest in maintaining gender inequality don't want anyone to know that. However, as Kunin demonstrates in this book, a real feminist agenda is a family agenda, one that creates benefits for both sexes alike as it ensures that women have equal rights to men.

Kunin offers up sensible suggestions for changes to society and the workplace that would benefit everyone, and she provides evidence to back up the legitimacy of these suggestions. One thing we do know from study after study is that societies fare much better when women wield some economic power, yet the U.S. is far behind the rest of the world when it comes to the creation of family-friendly policies that would enable both men and women to devote themselves to both career and family. For a nation that talks a lot about the importance of family, the U.S. takes a whole lot less action. Kunin draws comparisons to other countries with more liberal policies on things like free preschool education, state-subsidized child care, and extended paid maternity--and sometimes even paternity--leave. Yes, these changes do require a change in philosophy but, as Kunin shows, things like paid paternity leaves are gaining traction in places like Scandinavia, where employers are gradually coming to not only expect their male employees to take some time off after a baby is born, but to recognize the value in it.

Free preschool education is another area of great importance--there's a reason why it figured so prominently in President Obama's State of the Union speech. Regardless of where one falls on the political spectrum, studies prove that early childhood is critical to the development of children, both emotional and education. Children who attend preschool are better prepared and fare better in their later school careers, which means they score better on the all-important standardized tests upon which the U.S. has become so dependent. This has broad-reaching economic implications, as areas that have a highly educated population are attractive to the high-tech industries that form the backbone of 21st century economics. In order to be competitive with the rest of the world, the U.S. will need to get serious about education, and providing every American child with a preschool education is the first step. Even for those Americans who don't have children, there will be benefits in the form of better availability of high-quality jobs and a better economy for the country as a whole.

One of the other interesting areas Kunin explores is how diversity influences the profitability of businesses. On the face of it, this shouldn't come as such a surprise. When you have a company that tends to be homogenous, it stands to reason that their views will also be homogenous, which means they will be missing out on huge swaths of potential business. By diversifying company staffs and especially company leadership, businesses open the door to a wider range of ideas and opinions, which can only help them to better understand the clientele they serve.

The domestic sphere is another area addressed in the book whose importance I think is underestimated. Studies show that households with more equitable divisions of labor enjoy greater levels of martial satisfaction, which only makes sense. How can women feel they're valued by their partners if they're treated as unpaid household servants? Happier, more peaceful marriages would likely mean less divorce, and greater involvement in their children's lives on the parts of fathers would mean happier children. Looked at from another perspective, how does it serve men to tell them that their desire to spend more time with their families is of no value, and that they are meant only to be chained to their desk, working away while their children grow up without them?

I strongly recommend this book to anyone who wants a clearer picture of what feminism is all about, because it will help them to understand that the structure of our society is not only harmful to women, it's harmful to men in ways that we, as Americans, haven't fully acknowledged. By treating people like people with their own hopes, wishes, dreams, and desires, we will be doing a far greater service than lumping them into "male" and "female" and assigning certain characteristics to everyone who falls within those categories. By reaching gender parity, we can also reach a new definition of "manhood", one that's far more inclusive of men who don't fall within the traditional, stereotypical definitions of what it means to be a man.
Blackbrand
Must sheepishly admit that I almost passed on The New Feminist Agenda: Defining the Next Revolution for Women, Work, and Family as being just another one of those strident and angry books that says nothing new, yet has the endorsement from every pandering politician who wants to get the female vote. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 46.2% of female citizens 18 and older reported voting in the 2010 congressional election, whereas 45% of their male counterparts cast a ballot, and pollsters have reported these numbers to these politicians, who know that even 0.1% counts in an election... a powerful constituency indeed.

But then I noticed that the author was none other than Madeleine Kunin, and it was like slamming on the brakes of a speeding car; I had to grab the book, and am glad that I did. But more on this later.

Madeleine Kunin's writing here is almost commonplace; there are no huge, attention-grabbing explosions of theoretical ideas here. She systematically analyzes what we in America need, why we've never attained it, and how we may have some hope of succeeding in bringing about change in the future. In her typically understated fashion, she recognizes that while many individual women have achieved quite a bit since the beginnings of the women's liberation movement of the 1970s, our collective society has not recognized these accomplishments and responded to the needs of families that have changed so much since World War II.

Today only about 20% of American families with children aged fifteen and under are now composed of the old standard of a working father and a stay-at-home mother. The United States is now the only country among its advanced industrialized peers in the world to not offer any guaranteed paid leave for families with newborns, which ranks us in line with Papua New Guinea, Liberia and Swaziland.

Add to that, we are the only one of the world's 21 wealthiest nations in which paid sick days aren't mandatory by law. In comparison, the UK minimally offers mothers a full year of paid family leave, and six months of those can be transferred to fathers... along with a policy guaranteeing employees the right to request flexible work schedules. Add to this the fact that there are no other industrialized nations that can rival us for our low quality, underfunded, and largely unregulated day care and early childhood education systems. Author Kunin reports that 12% of them are so poor in quality that childcare experts actually consider them to be harmful to the children who manage to experience them.

Though at its core this is a feminist manifesto, it's not a diatribe. It reads like a real-world guide, one that's brimming with case studies and examples. The titles of the chapters illustrate this:

1. Time for a Pro-Family Revolution
2. How different are work/family policies in the United States from the Nordic Countries?
3. How different is the United States from England, Australia and Canada and the rest of the world?
4. Workplace Flexibility--a Win-Win Policy
5. The Importance of the Early Years: Child Care and Early Education
6. New Family Portraits
7. Female Leadership Makes a Difference
8. How to Begin
9. Building a Coalition
10. Addressing Child Poverty
11. How Do We Win?

In the beginning of the second chapter, Ms. Kunin states:

"It may seem a retrograde step to suggest that feminists like me, who strove to liberate ourselves from the limited roles of wife and mother, have come full circle to focus, once again, on the family. At the start of the feminist revolution, we did not dwell on the question of who would take care of the children. We assumed things would fall into place. Childcare centers would spring up like flowers and workplaces would be magically transformed to meet our needs. The catch phrase became "we can have it all." Not everyone agreed."

Author Kunin goes on to explain that efforts to make the term "feminist" less provocative have not been successful, and that for some, it still remains "radioactive." She identifies herself as a feminist because it stands for equality, yet that has yet to be achieved, and notes the following regarding the term:

"This generation is not the first to distance itself from the word. It is one of the ironies of our time that every woman in America, regardless of her age, race, earnings, or political beliefs, has been affected by the modern feminist movement--whether she is a supervisor on the factory floor or a physics professor at a university; or whether she is Sarah Palin or Hillary Clinton. Without Title IX, Sarah Palin would probably not have played college basketball and Hillary Clinton may not have been admitted to Yale Law School. Neither one of them would have been able to campaign for president or vice president of the United States. My generation helped make it happen, but we should not expect gratitude."

There's a lot of good food for thought in this book, and Ms. Kunin doesn't beat us to death with angry and harsh rhetoric to make her points. She uses facts to note that as a country, we have the uppermost rate of child poverty in the developed world, test scores that lag far behind those of other nations, an appalling incarceration rate and an American dream that's failing. She notes that this is "not only an unjust waste of human potential, it is a dangerous economic policy that will impact the well-being of every American."

None of this is new ground for the author. I had the pleasure of meeting Madeleine Kunin when she was Governor of Vermont in the '80s. A friend and client had moved his manufacturing business from Connecticut to Stockbridge, VT, and had relocated all of his employees who wanted to make the move... and over 90% of them did. But she was speaking on family values and good corporate examples at the business opening, and afterwards we were introduced, and had a chance to chat for a few minutes. I walked away from that conversation quite impressed.

Madeleine Kunin was elected to the first of three terms as governor in 1984, and is the first woman in U.S. history to be elected governor three times. While in office she focused on education, children's issues and on the environment. Her book Living a Political Life (1995) is a narrative of her career prior to joining the U.S. Department of Education in the '90s. Her later book, Pearls, Politics, and Power: How Women Can Win and Lead (2008) set the pace for what we find in this book, noting that women are not a political monolith, but are citizens and voters who make a priority of children, family, education, health care, and the environment, among other issues.

Her focus when I met her was on family values, as it is now, and it's not just a woman's issue; we need a societal change in our values. There must be a way to turn public opinion, which Ms. Kunin feels is more favorable to just paid sick days and family and medical leave, into something like a campaign for the rights of all, and especially for families. She wisely asks: "Could we hold a march for family/work policies in Washington? Would anybody come? Or would they be too tired, too busy, too scared of losing their jobs to attend?"

8/8/2012
Maximilianishe
Madeleine M. Kunin, the author of this excellent book, was one of the first women governors in our country. She's probably uniquely qualified to bring this topic to the forefront in our minds once again. Contrary to what many people may believe, the women's movement was not just something for the 1960s and 1970s. We can all agree some great strides were made then. There is still much work remaining to be done. Without turning her work into a political rant, she brings many important topics to our attention, and gives all Americans something to think about, whether they are men or women. For example, for most of us, our family and economic needs take a major percentage of our time, work and concern. Families and single people today tend to struggle financially, and financial survival is a major concern for all. However, she points out that about 44 percent of the members of Congress are millionaires, many of them several times over. They are woefully out of touch with the average American family. We all are deserving of a fair shake and some peace of mind. Extremely eye-opening and well written, this book will meet you where you live, and teach (or remind) you of what is still needed, regardless how far we may have come.

The author has a rare gift, the ability to share a somewhat dry and uninteresting topic with wit and grace, while imparting good solid information for all of us. The goals before us all are achievable, and her ideas and information show us the way to make a better future for our families and ourselves. Highly recommended reading, especially in an election year!