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ISBN:0824827457
Author: Bruce I. Yamashita USMCR
ISBN13: 978-0824827458
Title: Fighting Tradition: A Marine's Journey to Justice (Intersections: Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies)
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ePUB size: 1675 kb
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Language: English
Category: Sociology
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (September 30, 2003)
Pages: 256

Fighting Tradition: A Marine's Journey to Justice (Intersections: Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies) by Bruce I. Yamashita USMCR



by Bruce I. Yamashita USMCR (Author). I am currently receiving my GI BILL and my major is Asian American Studies. I am writing my senior paper on Asian American Marines. This book is a real realistic and honest look into modern racism in the Marines. REAL marines that have seen a combat deployment will be able to decypher fact from fiction and this is the real deal. Asian America needs REAL patriots like this author, and some SELLOUTS who remain nameless need to go home with their fictional world of a level playing field. YOU sir are a good marine! Semper FI.

Marine Corps officer, Bruce Yamashita enrolled in Officer Candidate School, where he was the target of persistent racial harassment by officers and staff. Fighting Tradition is Yamashita's own story of his courageous struggle to expose a pattern of racial discrimination against minorities that has existed at various levels of the Corps. With the support of a broad coalition of community and civil rights organizations, the Hawai'i-born law school graduate fought a five-year-long legal, political, and media battle against the military establishment that ended in his commissioning as a captain and the revision of Marine Corps policies and procedures.

Asian American studies, religionLIEWThis is the first single-authored book on Asian American biblical interpretatio. Blues and Greens: A Produce Worker’s Journal Alan Chong Lau Music through the Dark: A Tale of Survival in Cambodia Bree Lafrenier Tomorrow’s Memories: A Diary, 1924–1928 Angeles Monrayo Fighting Tradition: A Marine’s Journey to Justice Captain Bruce I. Yamashita, USMCR The . Generation: Becoming Korean American in Hawai‘i Mary Yu Danico This Isn’t a Picture.

Determined to be a . Marine Corps officer, Bruce Yamashita enrolled in Officer Candidate School, where he was the target of persistent racial harassment by officers and staff. After enduring nine weeks of emotional and physical abuse, Yamashita was "disenrolled" in April 1989 - kicked out of the Marine Corps because of the color of his skin

Words Matter: Conversations With Asian American Writers (Intersections, Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies). Download (pdf, 836 Kb) Donate Read.

Fighting Tradition is Bruce Yamashita’s own story of his struggle to expose a pattern of racial discrimination against minorities that has existed at various levels of the Corps. Determined to be a . Marine Corps officer, Yamashita enrolled in the 140th Officer Candidate School at Quantico (VA), where he was the target of persistent racial harassment by officers and staff. On the first day, a sergeant instructor yelled: You speak English? Well we don’t want your kind around here, go back to your own country!

The Blind Writer Stories and a Novella Intersections Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studie.

When Bruce Yamashita arrived at Marine Corps Officer Candidate School, one of the first things he heard was a staff sergeant yelling, "You speak English? We don't want your kind around here. When Bruce Yamashita arrived at Marine Corps Officer Candidate School, one of the first things he heard was a staff sergeant yelling, "You speak English? We don't want your kind around here. Go back to your own country. Another sergeant ridiculed him, saying, "We have no tea and sushi here, Yamashita. Another spoke to him only in broken Japanese  . Fighting Tradition: A Marine's Journey to Justice (Intersections Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies).

Intersections: Asian and Pacific American Transcultural Studies. xiii, 342 pp. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press in association with UCLA Asian American Studies Center, Los Angeles, 2014. Positions, over the last few years, has published groundbreaking articles on questions of colonialism and modernity in East Asia, and explored the distinct perspectives post-structuralist and postcolonial theory might bring to area studies. Across both studies, Asian Americans referred to American customs and traditional behavior more than European Americans.

Determined to be a U.S. Marine Corps officer, Bruce Yamashita enrolled in Officer Candidate School, where he was the target of persistent racial harassment by officers and staff. After enduring nine weeks of emotional and physical abuse, Yamashita was "disenrolled" in April 1989―kicked out of the Marine Corps because of the color of his skin. Fighting Tradition is Yamashita’s own story of his courageous struggle to expose a pattern of racial discrimination against minorities that has existed at various levels of the Corps.

With the support of a broad coalition of community and civil rights organizations, the Hawaii-born law school graduate fought a five-year-long legal, political, and media battle against the military establishment that ended in his commissioning as a captain and the revision of Marine Corps policies and procedures. Fighting Tradition not only is a moving story of personal sacrifice and vision, but contributes also both directly and indirectly to our understanding of the complexities of institutional racism in a politically conservative, demographically shifting society. It is a unique window into the dynamics of race, government, and the law and a stirring reminder of the importance of political mobilization by the individual to achieve justice.

Reviews: 5
Tinavio
As a woman and minority, I found this book tremendously empowering. The companion documentary, A Most Unlikely Hero: A Film by Steve Okino (2003), was equally invigorating and encouraging. Like one of the reviewers stated, “Bruce won his case,” through his integrity and firm determination to correct the wrong. In some aspects, his five-year ordeal was more enduring and painful, if not equally, than his 9-week of OCS training with bullying and racial discrimination. It even took a toll on his health at some point. Sure, he might have been a naïve young man at Georgetown Law School prior to this experience of blunt anti-Asian hostility at the Marine Corps. But these periods of trials and tribulations transformed him into a man of strength, who had willingly put his “neck on the line” and sticking to the end for the cause of civil rights for all of us. That record shows that Bruce I. Yamashita has overcome the mental and physical stress he was subjected to in those years. Another great message the reader can take home is the importance of community support. His story of victory tells us we shouldn’t think we didn’t just there by ourselves; never forget the time and effort those supporters make for you. Whatever huge accomplish we make in life, we don’t get there alone.

The book is rife with humor and is written in accessible language. Each chapter ends with a lead to what to come in the next chapter. Although I’m just a civilian, his story is still relatable as a minority living in the United States. The story is not about to become a hero; it’s about good citizenship, becoming grateful for what previous generations sacrificed for our generation, and most importantly, stepping up to a place of self-sacrifice and endurance for fellow citizens when your time comes. You don’t need to be a military person or a Japanese American to appreciate his story. I highly recommend this book for anyone, especially college-age minority students!
xander
Several years after Bruce Yamashita, I also entered OCS. My Gunny and some of the other Sgt’s at OCS were among the best people I have ever met in my life. However, you should have no doubt that in the 1980s, there was discrimination, sometimes blatant, against Asians. At the time, the U.S. had most recently been involved in conflicts in Korea and Vietnam, and for decades, the face of “the enemy” had been Asian. Also consider that Bruce was in the PLC Law program, which would commission him eventually as an O-3 Capt rather than an O-1 2ndLt. OCS staff members understandably applied greater scrutiny to candidates to be commissioned with advanced rank. The bottom line was that if they did not like you, they would use every tool in the book to set you up for failure, sometimes unfairly. And sometimes, race became part of the equation.

Lastly, keep in mind that Bruce won his case. Ask yourself honestly whether you think it is easy winning a case against the U.S. government, a branch of the military, or any governmental entity? It is extraordinarily difficult to fight Uncle Sam, even with a rock solid and righteous case. Bruce has my respect and admiration for fighting the fight, and then chronicling why and how he did so.
MegaStar
I am a American marine and served as an 0311 rifleman in the Marine Corps 5th infantry regiment and i would like to say I love this book. I am currently receiving my GI BILL and my major is Asian American Studies. I am writing my senior paper on Asian American Marines. This book is a real realistic and honest look into modern racism in the Marines. REAL marines that have seen a combat deployment will be able to decypher fact from fiction and this is the real deal. Asian America needs REAL patriots like this author, and some SELLOUTS who remain nameless need to go home with their fictional world of a level playing field. YOU sir are a good marine!
Semper FI
komandante
There was no tradition of discriminating against Asians in the USMC...I would refer you to Navy Cross recipient Maj Chew-Een Lee USMC - what do you think he underwent being a AA Marine officer in the 50s! I was at OCS the same time Bruce was there...no big deal - some racial remarks but nothing I would call institutionalized discrimination. I and a Vietnamese-American graduated the same summer he was there - why weren't we dropped? Maybe because we performed to acceptable standards while Bruce did not. OCS is meant to subject candidates to mental and physical stress - if you can't hack someone calling you names - how will you take combat?? Most of my Sgt Instructors were minorities themselves - if anything I think they were glad to see that a minority was becoming an officer. I've been a Marine officer for 15 years and can only say - I think he's made himself famous at the expense of other AA Marine officers who have graduated OCS without having to file a lawsuit.

Semper Fidelis