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ISBN:0292725760
Author: Judith E. Grasberg,Araceli Tinajero
ISBN13: 978-0292725768
Title: El Lector: A History of the Cigar Factory Reader (Llilas Translations from Latin America)
Format: mbr azw doc rtf
ePUB size: 1926 kb
FB2 size: 1714 kb
DJVU size: 1272 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: University of Texas Press (November 15, 2010)
Pages: 300

El Lector: A History of the Cigar Factory Reader (Llilas Translations from Latin America) by Judith E. Grasberg,Araceli Tinajero



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El Lector A History of the Cig. Beginning Latin Poetry Reader: 70 Passages from Classical Roman Verse and Drama (Latin Reader Series). Ordinary Places Extraordinary Events: Citizenship, Democracy and Public Space in Latin America (Planning, History and Environment Series). A Cultural History of Cuba during the . Occupation, 1898-1902 (Latin America in Translation En Traduccion Em Traducao). Changing Race: Latinos, the Census and the History of Ethnicity (Critical America Series). Please Don't Wish Me a Merry Christmas: A Critical History of the Separation of Church and State (Critical America Series).

In El Lector, Araceli Tinajero deftly traces the evolution of the reader from nineteenth-century Cuba to the present and its eventual dissemination to Tampa, Key West, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. In interviews with present-day and retired readers, she records testimonies that otherwise would have been lost forever, creating a valuable archive for future historians. Because of the reader, cigar factory workers were far more cultured and in touch with the political currents of the day than other workers. But it was not only the reading material, which provided political and literary information that yielded self-education, that influenced the workers; the act of being read to increased the discipline and timing of the artisan's job. Show more.

of the Cigar Factory Reader. Translated by Judith E. Grasberg. The practice of reading aloud has a long his-tory, and the tradition still survives in Cuba as a hard-won right deeply embedded in cigar factory workers’ culture. In El Lector, Araceli Tinajero deftly traces the evolution of the reader from nineteenth-century Cuba to the present and its eventual dissemination to Tampa, Key West, Puerto Rico, the Domini-can Republic, and Mexico  . Because of the reader, cigar factory workers were far more cultured and in touch with the political cur-rents of the day than other workers.

A History of the Cigar Factory Reader. Written by Araceli Tinajero, Translated by Judith E. Series LLILAS Translations from Latin America Series. University of Texas Press. The practice of reading aloud has a long history, and the tradition still survives in Cuba as a hard-won right deeply embedded in cigar factory workers' culture Learn More. Published: 15th November 2010.

1st ed. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 978-0-292-72175-3 (alk. paper) 1. Oral reading. 3. Tobacco workers- Cuba-History. 4. Tobacco industry-Puerto Rico-History. 5. Tobacco workers -Puerto Rico-History.

Judith A. Weiss (a1). Mount Allison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, Canada. Recommend this journal.

Araceli Tinajero's Documents. El Lector: A History of the Cigar Factory Reader (Llilas Translations from Latin America Series). The Reshaped Mind: Searle, the Biblical Writers, and Christ's Blood (Biblical Interpretation Series). La Autonomia a Debate: autogobierno indigena y Estado plurinacional en America Latina.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Thirteen-year-old Bella wants to be a lector just like her grandfather, who sits on a special platform in the cigar factory. While most children will not know much about lectores, cigar rolling, and Depression-era Spanish Floridian culture, Durbin explains each one clearly, providing tidy translations for all of the Spanish used. In one particularly evocative passage, the wind brings smells from fresh-baked bread, guava, or damp tobacco, depending on its orientation. However, this richly envisioned world sometimes eclipses the rising action of the labor struggles and slows the books pacing, weighing it down with numerous subsidiary plot threads. This book belongs to the corpus of studies about the history of universal reading. I do not mention books banned by the Cuban government, since this study deals with actual public readings in state-controlled cigar factories; I have assumed that such books are never read to the workers. They should be part of a broader study about censorship, a topic that is beyond the scope of my book.

The practice of reading aloud has a long history, and the tradition still survives in Cuba as a hard-won right deeply embedded in cigar factory workers' culture. In El Lector, Araceli Tinajero deftly traces the evolution of the reader from nineteenth-century Cuba to the present and its eventual dissemination to Tampa, Key West, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. In interviews with present-day and retired readers, she records testimonies that otherwise would have been lost forever, creating a valuable archive for future historians.

Through a close examination of journals, newspapers, and personal interviews, Tinajero relates how the reading was organized, how the readers and readings were selected, and how the process affected the relationship between workers and factory owners. Because of the reader, cigar factory workers were far more cultured and in touch with the political currents of the day than other workers. But it was not only the reading material, which provided political and literary information that yielded self-education, that influenced the workers; the act of being read to increased the discipline and timing of the artisan's job.