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ISBN:0767914791
Author: Chris Colin
ISBN13: 978-0767914796
Title: What Really Happened to the Class of '93: Start-ups, Dropouts, and Other Navigations Through an Untidy Decade
Format: docx lrf doc lit
ePUB size: 1286 kb
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DJVU size: 1351 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Broadway; 1st edition (May 11, 2004)
Pages: 304

What Really Happened to the Class of '93: Start-ups, Dropouts, and Other Navigations Through an Untidy Decade by Chris Colin



Through his classmates' intensely personal stories from a decade defined by Monica Lewinsky, economic downturn and 9/11, Colin presents an arresting picture of an extraordinary era. Get A Copy. The author continues to refer to the pre-trans/high school person he knew with the wrong pronouns and name, which I can imagine many trans individuals will be upset by (and rightfully so - don't deadname anyone!). What Really Happened to the Class of '93? Honestly, nothing that surprising. Some of the weirdos and freaks settled down, the bully learned to handle his emotions better, the busy over-achiever continues to overachieve - exactly the way most high school graduates do, regardless of whatever year they graduate.

How did the Class of 93 of Thomas Jefferson HS in northern Virgina turn out, 10 years later? The writer, himself a TJ 93 grad, focuses on 16 people (out of a class of 404), with himself interwoven throughout the book. The writer's basic premise is that 1993-2003 represents the "real" 90s decade (starting with Clinton's presidency, and ending with the start of the war in Iraq, with the internet Boom and Bubble, Monica Lewinsky and of course 9/11 along the way). The best part of the book is (not surprisingly) to see how people change over a period of 10 years  . Had Chris Colin opted to interview a class of '93 that wasn't his own, it would've worked better. Him knowing his subjects made for awkward scenarios.

Book Description The homecoming queen, the teen mom, the scientist, the wallflower, the flirt, the discipline case, and the homophobe-how did a decade marked by impeachment, a dot-com bubble, 9/11, and war shake their lives? The Thomas Jefferson High Sc. The Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology’s class of '93 graduated into an era of unprecedented optimism. The Soviet Union had collapsed, Clinton was pre-Monica, and rumors were spreading about a thing called the Internet. For youngpeople stepping out into the world for the first time, America hummed with promise. Just ten years later, that promise has collapsed into uncertainty, and the class of '93-nearly in their thirties now-finds itself struggling to make sense of all that's happened.

For the Class of '93, unbridled optimism gave way to bewilderment, peace to war, and happiness sometimes to tragedy. He lives in San Francisco. Библиографические данные.

What Really Happened to the Class of '93: Start-Ups, Dropouts, and Other Navigations through an Untidy Decade, Broadway Books (New York, NY), 2004. SIDELIGHTS: Journalist and author Chris Colin received his secondary education at the Thomas Jefferson School of Science and Technology in Fairfax County, Virginia, graduating in 1993

Chris Colin, author of What Really Happened to the Class of ’93: Start-Ups, Dropouts, and Other Navigations through an Untidy Decade. Paula Kamen, author of Feminist Fatale and Her Way: Young Women Remake the Sexual Revolution.

The book moves briskly from one crisp scene to the next, and ultimately casts a spell as captivating as Rules of Civility, a book that inhales you into its seductively Gatsby-esque. The Cold War: A New History. History Class, Historian, Cold War, John Lewis, My Books, Reading, Products, Foreign Policy, Gift List. When and why did Jesus' followers start saying "Jesus was God" and what did they mean by that? NPR Pins.

Looking for books by Chris Colin? See all books authored by Chris Colin, including What Really Happened to the Class of 93: Start-ups, Dropouts, and Other Navigations Through an Untidy Decade, and This Is Camino, and more on ThriftBooks. ThriftBooks® and the ThriftBooks® logo are registered trademarks of Thrift Books Global, LLC.

Class presentations and group projects are common. Sometimes the teacher hardly says anything. Many of the churches that have grown in membership in the past few decades are the fundamentalist Christian denominations that do require more strict adherence. However, these churches promote a very personalized form of religion. Chris Colin Book - What Really Happened to the Class of 93: Start-ups, Drop-outs, and other Navigations Through an Untidy Decade. Jean Twenge Abstract - Changes in the Need for Social Approval.

The homecoming queen, the teen mom, the scientist, the wallflower, the flirt, the discipline case, and the homophobe—how did a decade marked by impeachment, a dot-com bubble, 9/11, and war shake their lives? The Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology’s class of '93 graduated into an era of unprecedented optimism. The Soviet Union had collapsed, Clinton was pre-Monica, and rumors were spreading about a thing called the Internet. For young people stepping out into the world for the first time, America hummed with promise. Just ten years later, that promise has collapsed into uncertainty, and the class of '93—nearly in their thirties now—finds itself struggling to make sense of all that's happened.In the year leading up to his ten-year reunion, journalist Chris Colin tracked down his former classmates and asked them to pull back the curtains on their lives. Sometimes what he discovered was a swath of American history, other times simply frank and arresting accounts of how people fall in love, or steady their nerves on hills in Kosovo, or fall on their knees before God, or find out biology had handed them the wrong gender, and otherwise lurch into adulthood. And when the Thomas Jefferson class of '93 finally reconvenes for the reunion itself —after the very core of their country seems to have been shaken—Colin finds that maybe he and his classmates never left high school behind in the first place.For all that's been said about the dramatic years straddling the turn of the twenty-first century, little has been observed about those who actually came of age in that time. For the Class of '93, unbridled optimism gave way to bewilderment, peace to war, and happiness sometimes to tragedy. From these stories emerges a picture of an era and the intensely candid story of a few lives taking shape in the midst of it.

Reviews: 7
Yggdi
I found that I just really didn't care about any of these people. There was nothing really intriguing or surprising. People change, or don't. It probably would have been more interesting if I'd known them.
Jake
The 1990's saw the USA pull out of a recession, then came the internet revolution, and the indie film craze, the young dot-com millionaires, grunge rock, etc. There were dark spots too, like the Oklahoma City Bombing, Columbine, more school shootings, etc. But I always have good memories of the 90's. After al, 9/11 hadn't happened yet, and neither had the invasion of Iraq.

1993 was the start of the Clinton years. The internet revolution was still two years away, and so was the archetype 90's movie "Pulp Fiction". But high school students in the 1990's (at least according to this account) seemed more concerned about activism; gay rights, abortion rights, racial equality, and other left-wing causes. Things that we take for granted, such as a girl's right to wear a tux to the prom and bring a same-sex date, were not yet considered entitlements.

As far as the writing is concerned, it's great. The author lets his former classmates tell their stories without judging them, though he does wonder openly about their goals and results. One of his classmates got pregnant at 16, at a time when she was coming out as bisexual. She says that her life was not as hopeless as the media claims it was for teen moms. But she also admits to being depressed for years afterward, and you wonder if it was natural of a result of her lost opportunities?

I wonder how today's teens would view this book. These were the days before internet access, so you would have had to do your research at the library. CD burners weren't available yet, so you'd have to be content with floppies and cassette tapes. No DVD's either.

But MTV had music videos.
Granijurus
When I read the inside flap of this book, I knew right away that I would love this book, and I did. I basically ready it cover to cover, non-stop, one recent weekend. How did the Class of 93 of Thomas Jefferson HS in northern Virgina turn out, 10 years later? The writer, himself a TJ 93 grad, focuses on 16 people (out of a class of 404), with himself interwoven throughout the book. The writer's basic premise is that 1993-2003 represents the "real" 90s decade (starting with Clinton's presidency, and ending with the start of the war in Iraq, with the internet Boom and Bubble, Monica Lewinsky and of course 9/11 along the way).

The best part of the book is (not surprisingly) to see how people change over a period of 10 years. In fact, it would appear that may, if not most, of the '93 TJ grads turn out very different after 10 years than their HS graduation would have lead most to believe or expect. One of the best stories involves Karen Taggert (yes, the reviewer right below me), who ends up teaching inner-city schools in DC. Another compelling story is John Doyle, the rigid military-reared (with accompanying strong views) kid who goes to West Point and undergoes a major change after doing his 5 yr duty in the military. I equally disagree with David Jacobs' review that the inclusion of the chapter on Sean Bryant (who took his life in college) was disrespectful or exploitative.

If there is one common thread throughout the stories of these now 27-28 yr olds looking back at high school, it's that many of them don't really seem all that happy! "We were prepared to be successful but not to be happy" is a statement that comes back more than once. Wow, that worries me (having 2 kids in HS now).

The last chapter, on the actual 10 year HS reunion, is somewhat of a letdown, after reading so many fascinating stories. But then again, isn't any HS reunion a letdown? It doesn't diminish the value of the book. Ultimately, the writer did an excellent job in making a bunch of strangers into compelling persons. Highly recommended! (And a sequel 10 years from now would be most welcome...)
Umor
I was interested in reading this book when I heard about it, but ended up being thoroughly disappointed. This book tries to marry a social study/commentary together with what seems to be a memoir, and it doesn't work. Had Chris Colin opted to interview a class of '93 that wasn't his own, it would've worked better. Him knowing his subjects made for awkward scenarios. Also, I felt Colin tried to insert himself and his opinions into the subjects' stories too many times, yet ironically, I still know nothing of him and where he fit into his high school social strata.

Where Colin also fails is where he tries to make larger cultural milestones and tragedies, such as Clinton/Lewinsky, the dot.com boom and 9/11 ham-fistedly fit into how it affected his classmates. With all the alcohol and drug consumption mentioned in this book, I'd be surprised if any of them were sober long enough to care.

I felt it was exploitative at parts, such as mentioning the suicides of two classmates (and acting as if one was more tragic than another) and the story of his Mormon classmate, a guy struggling with depression and feeling like he's not succeeding. I felt Colin was patronizing in his chapter on him.

Also, it was hard to like anyone who was interviewed. Out of all the people in his graduating class, what made these specific people interesting? You have the black woman who seems to distrust white people yet she marries a white man to the white woman who was raised in clueless privilege yet is trying to save the "po' black chilluns" by teaching in one of DC's impoverished neighborhoods. Gag me with a spoon. You've also got someone trying (blandly) to make it as an actress in NYC, a man who came out of the closet but was a straight horndog in high school, and the most annoying subject was the girl who was one of those overachievers who liked everybody (i.e., but only stuck to popular people) who now sanctimoniously lectures people on why they should use only fair-trade coffee. Not one person interviewed sounded intriguing or likable enough to warrant interest in wanting to know more about them.

Would this group be more interesting in 2013? I doubt it. I'm glad I only borrowed this book from the library (its pages were grossly covered in chicken wing hot sauce, at least that's what I hope that was) and didn't buy it. There are more poignant and intriguing stories about more interesting people out there.