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ISBN:1565844823
Author: Adolph L. Reed
ISBN13: 978-1565844827
Title: Class Notes: Posing As Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene
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ePUB size: 1768 kb
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: The New Press (May 1, 2000)
Pages: 320

Class Notes: Posing As Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene by Adolph L. Reed



Class Notes sparkles with wit and wisdom. Reed’s essay on the political and intellectual left since the 1960s is the best analysis of American radicalism in print. Judith Stein, professor of history, The City University of New York. Opening Adolph Reed’s Class Notes is like boarding a roller coaster. What follows is an opinionated, headspinning loop, brilliantly executed, through the controversies of the recent past and immediate future. I strongly recommend taking the ride.

Hailed by Publishers Weekly for its forceful and bracing opinions on race and politics, Class Notes is critic Adolph Reed J. s latest blast of clear thinking on matters of race, class, and other American dilemmas. The book begins with a consideration of the theoretical and practical strategies of the . left over the last three decades: Reed argues against the solipsistic approaches of cultural or identity politics, and in favor of class-based political interpretation and action. Class Notes moves on to tackle race relations, ethnic studies, family values, welfare reform, the so-called.

Reed's work on American politics is notable for its critique of identity politics and antiracism, particularly of their role in Black politics. Reed had been a harsh critic of the policies and ideology of Black Democratic politicians In an article in The Village Voice dated January 16, 1996, he said of Obama:. ISBN 978-0-8133-2051-9. Class Notes: Posing as Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene (2000). ISBN 978-1-56584-675-3. Stirrings in the Jug: Black Politics in the Post-Segregation Era (1999). ISBN 978-0-8166-2681-6. Du Bois and American Political Thought: Fabianism and the Color Line (1997). ISBN 978-0-19-513098-0.

Personal Name: Reed, Adolph . 1947-. Publication, Distribution, et. New York Introd. Geographic Name: United States Politics and government 1993-2001. ISBN: 1566771064 (pb.

Adolph L. Reed, Jr. is a professor of political science at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in race and American politics. Race, Politics, and Culture: Critical Essays on the Radicalism of the 1960s (Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies) by Adolph Reed Jr. (1986-10-16). Class Notes: Posing As Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene. left over the last three decades: Reed argues against the solip Hailed by Publishers Weekly for its forceful and bracing opinions on race and politics, Class Notes is critic Adolph Reed J.

Hailed by Publishers Weekly for its "forceful" and "bracing opinions on race and politics," Class Notes is critic Adolph Reed J.

Hailed by Publishers Weekly for its “forceful” and “bracing opinions on race and politics,” Class Notes is critic Adolph Reed Jr.’s latest blast of clear thinking on matters of race, class, and other American dilemmas. The book begins with a consideration of the theoretical and practical strategies of the U.S. left over the last three decades: Reed argues against the solipsistic approaches of cultural or identity politics, and in favor of class-based political interpretation and action.

Class Notes moves on to tackle race relations, ethnic studies, family values, welfare reform, the so-called underclass, and black public intellectuals in essays called “head-spinning” and “brilliantly executed” by David Levering Lewis.

Adolph Reed Jr. has earned a national reputation for his controversial evaluations of American politics. These essays illustrate why people like Katha Pollitt consider Reed “the smartest person of any race, class, or gender writing on race, class, and gender.”

Reviews: 3
Wild Python
A compendium of insightful essays regarding the social construct "race," ethnic studies, class distinctions, gender, etc. and the politics, both Democrat and Republican, that feed it. Should be mandatory reading in our educational system!
Wal
Highly recommended reading whether you agree with the author or not. A revealing quote from this book: "I do not want to hear another word about drugs or crime without hearing in the same breath about decent jobs, adequate housing and egalitarian education." Those are all addressed together, from the opposing point of view, in Heather MacDonald's "The Burden of Bad Ideas." Read them together and form your own opinion as to the cause of failure in urban America. Reed argues well but I think MacDonald wins in this debate.
GEL
These essays are compulsively readable, and (for the most part) they have aged well. Essays like "Tokens of the White Left," "What Are the Drums Saying, Booker?", "Liberals, I Do Despise," and "The Underclass Myth" are classics. They should be required reading for all students of the U.S. left and African American politics. Reed is a deeply knowledgeable, trenchant, and often witty (sometimes uproariously funny) social critic. I particularly admire his principled critique of the Democrats' move to the right, his skewering of culture of poverty discourse, and his impatience for cant and pieties of all kinds (especially about race). I don't agree with him about everything. I think his take on hip hop is a bit reductive, and he's sometimes excessively harsh toward other black left academics. But, in addition to being an enjoyable read, this book is also an important document of 1990s politics that remains relevant in many ways today. Because this is a more accessible introduction to Reed than Stirrings in the Jug, I recommend it to those new to his work.