» » No Fire Next Time: Black-Korean Conflicts and the Future of America's Cities
Download No Fire Next Time: Black-Korean Conflicts and the Future of America's Cities epub book
ISBN:0801439418
Author: Patrick D. Joyce
ISBN13: 978-0801439414
Title: No Fire Next Time: Black-Korean Conflicts and the Future of America's Cities
Format: lit lrf rtf lrf
ePUB size: 1240 kb
FB2 size: 1168 kb
DJVU size: 1870 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Cornell University Press (July 22, 2003)
Pages: 240

No Fire Next Time: Black-Korean Conflicts and the Future of America's Cities by Patrick D. Joyce



Why did Black-Korean tensions result in violent clashes in Los Angeles but not in New York City? In a book. In a book based on fieldwork and on a nationwide database he constructed to track such conflicts, Patrick D. Joyce goes beyond sociological and cultural explanations. No Fire Next Time shows how political practices and urban institutions can channel racial and ethnic tensions i Why did Black-Korean tensions result in violent clashes in Los Angeles but not in New York City? In a book based on fieldwork and on a nationwide database he constructed to track such conflicts, Patrick D.

Why did Black-Korean tensions result in violent clashes in Los Angeles but not in New York City? In a book based on fieldwork and on a nationwide database he constructed to track such conflicts, Patrick D. No Fire Text Time shows how political practices and urban institutions can channel racial and ethnic tensions into protest or, alternatively, leave them free to erupt violently. Few encounters demonstrate this connection better than those between African Americans and Korean Americans

Few encounters demonstrate this connection better than those between African Americans and Korean Americans. Cities like New York, where politics is noisy, contentious, and involves people at the grassroots, have seen extensive Black boycotts of Korean-owned businesses (usually small grocery stores).

Personal Name: Joyce, Patrick D. Publication, Distribution, et. Ithaca. Cornell University Press, (c)2003. Black-Korean conflict in American cities Explaining Black-Korean conflicts Comparing New York City and Los Angeles New York City : heat without fire Los Angeles : fire without smoke No fire next time. Geographic Name: New York (. Geographic Name: Los Angeles (Calif.

In No Fire Next Time, Patrick Joyce offers another possible approach to conflict resolution: He asks the unasked question, what is wrong with conflict? Overall, Joyce offers a fresh perspective on an old, yet unresolved issue that continues to shape relations among native-born and immigrant minority groups in America. Joyce's book is a long-awaited study that finally offers a complex analysis of community activism among Black Americans within the context of local politics in New York and Los Angeles.

In No Fire Next Time, Patrick D. Joyce offers another possible approach to conflict resolution by asking the yet unasked question: what’s wrong with conflict? Overall, Joyce offers a fresh perspective on an old yet unresolved issue that continues to shape relations among native-born and immigrant minority groups in America. Scholarly discussion on Korean-Black conflicts has been primarily focused on Korean immigrant entrepreneurship and has rarely provided a developed analysis on the Black-led boycotts themselves with a few major exceptions

Patrick D. Joyce's book not only has a provocative title but also says something important about the future of America's cities.

Published by: Cornell University Press.

Cornell University Press, 2003. Volume 63 Issue 4 - Pyong Gap Min. Ad. Do you want to read the rest of this article? Request full-text. No Fire Next Time shows how political practices and urban institutions can channel racial and ethnic tensions into protest or, alternately, leave them free to erupt violently.

Why did Black-Korean tensions result in violent clashes in Los Angeles but not in New York City? In a book based on fieldwork and on a nationwide database he constructed to track such conflicts, Patrick D. Joyce goes beyond sociological and cultural explanations. No Fire Next Time shows how political practices and urban institutions can channel racial and ethnic tensions into protest or, alternately, leave them free to erupt violently. Few encounters demonstrate this connection better than those between African Americans and Korean Americans.Cities like New York, where politics is noisy, contentious, and involves people at the grassroots, have seen extensive Black boycotts of Korean-owned businesses (usually small grocery stores). African Americans in Los Angeles have sustained few long-term boycotts of Korean American businesses―but the absence of "routine" contention there goes hand in hand with the large-scale riots of 1992 and continuous acts of individual violence.In demonstrating how conflicts between these groups were intimately tied to their political surroundings, this book yields practical lessons for the future. City governments can do little to fight widening economic inequality in an increasingly diverse nation, Joyce writes. But officials and activists can restructure political institutions to provide the foundations for new multiracial coalitions.