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ISBN:0822317362
Author: C. Eric Lincoln
ISBN13: 978-0822317364
Title: Coming through the Fire: Surviving Race and Place in America
Format: rtf lrf azw mobi
ePUB size: 1992 kb
FB2 size: 1616 kb
DJVU size: 1961 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Duke University Press Books; 1st edition (March 12, 1996)
Pages: 168

Coming through the Fire: Surviving Race and Place in America by C. Eric Lincoln



Personal Name: Lincoln, C. Eric (Charles Eric), 1924-. Publication, Distribution, et. Durham . Duke University Press, (c)1996. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Coming through the fire : surviving race and place in America, C. Eric Lincoln.

In Coming through the Fire, prominent scholar and writer C. Eric Lincoln addresses the most important issue of our time with insights forged by a lifetime of confronting racial oppression in America. Born in a small rural town in northern Alabama, raised by his grandparents, Lincoln portrays in rich detail the nuances of racial conflict and control that characterized the c In Coming through the Fire, prominent scholar and writer C. Others will simply find C. Eric Lincoln’s personal story and his exploration of survival and race in America to be absorbing and compelling reading. Born in a small rural town in northern Alabama. He felt that the Black church and Black preacher kept the system in place and tended to support the oppression (pg67). I wondered where he would have put the Black minister in his triad of "Good, Bad, and Smart Nigers". I felt that the few paragraphs that he gave to Christianity were inadequate, considering the role that the Black and White church played in abolishing slavery and in the civil rights movement.

Eric Lincoln (June 23, 1924 – May 14, 2000) was an African-American scholar. He was the author of several books, including sociological works such as The Black Church Since Frazier (1974) and Race, Religion and the Continuing American Dilemma (1984), as well as fiction and poetry. Coming Through the Fire: Surviving Race and Place in America (1996). C. Eric Lincoln Lecture Series Collection, Audio-Visual Recordings from Atlanta University Center.

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surviving race and place in America. Published 1996 by Duke University Press in Durham, NC. Written in English. African American authors, American Authors, Authors, American, Biography, Race relations, Racism. Eric Lincoln (1924-).

Duke University Press. Lincoln, now emeritus at Duke where he taught religion and culture, did pioneering academic work in race relations and is noted for his The Black Muslims in America, published more than twenty years ago. The present book is in some respects a memoir about being black in America, and mostly an exhortation to interracial trust and cooperation. It bears witness to one man's determination to resist the siren songs of racial separatism, regardless of the race of the singers. All God's People: A Theology of the Church.

Charles Eric Lincoln was born on June 23, 1924. By the time he was four, his mother, Bradonia Lincoln, had married Ernest Blye and moved to Pittsburgh, and his father had moved to Nashville, Tennessee. Lincoln remained in Athens, where he was raised by his maternal grandparents Mattie Sowell Lincoln and Charles Less Lincoln. The New York Times reported that the book was unsurpassed as a sociological study. From 1962 to 1972, Lincoln served as adjunct or visiting professor at several American colleges and universities, including Portland State College (now Portland State University, Oregon), Union Theological Seminary (New York City), and Fordham University (New York City). Additional Resources. Flora, Joseph . Amber Vogel, and Bryan Albin Giemza.

Educator and Sociologist C. Eric Lincoln was born June 23, 1924 in Athens, Alabama. After he was abandoned by his parents, Lincoln was raised by his maternal grandparents. He attended the Trinity School in Athens, an institution created by the New England-based Congregational Church to meet the secondary education needs of African Americans in that community. While there Lincoln picked cotton to earn money to purchase his books and pay the three dollar per year tuition for his studies.

In Coming through the Fire, prominent scholar and writer C. Eric Lincoln addresses the most important issue of our time with insights forged by a lifetime of confronting racial oppression in America. Born in a small rural town in northern Alabama, raised by his grandparents, Lincoln portrays in rich detail the nuances of racial conflict and control that characterized the community of Athens, personal experiences which would lead him to dedicate his life to illuminating issues of race and social identity. The contradictions and calamities of being black and poor in the United States become a purifying fire for his searing analyses of the contemporary meanings of race and color. Coming through the Fire, with its fiercely intelligent, passionate, and clear-eyed view of race and class conflict, makes a major contribution to understanding—and thereby healing—the terrible rift that has opened up in the heart of America. Lincoln explores the nature of biracial relationships, the issue of transracial adoption, violence—particularly black-on-black violence—the “endangered” black male, racism as power, the relationship between Blacks and Jews, our multicultural melting pot, and Minister Louis Farrakhan.Without sidestepping painful issues, or sacrificing a righteous anger, the author argues for “no-fault reconciliation,” for mutual recognition of the human endowment we share regardless of race, preparing us as a nation for the true multiculture tomorrow will demand. Readers familiar with Lincoln’s earlier groundbreaking work on the Black Muslims and on the black church will be eagerly awaiting the publication of Coming through the Fire. Others will simply find C. Eric Lincoln’s personal story and his exploration of survival and race in America to be absorbing and compelling reading.