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ISBN:0299171345
Author: Peter F. Murphy
ISBN13: 978-0299171346
Title: Studs, Tools, and the Family Jewels: Metaphors Men Live By
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ePUB size: 1657 kb
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: University of Wisconsin Press; 1 edition (April 7, 2001)
Pages: 184

Studs, Tools, and the Family Jewels: Metaphors Men Live By by Peter F. Murphy



These metaphors men live by, Murphy contends, reinforce the view that relationships are tactical encounters that must be won, because the alternative is the loss of manhood. Murphy also believes, however, that awareness of these metaphorical power plays is the basis for behavioral change: "How we talk about ourselves as men can alter the way we live.

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These metaphors men live by, Murphy contends, reinforce the view that relationships are tactical encounters that must be won, because the alternative is the loss of manhood.

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This book presents the findings of a 3-yr ethnographic study between 1990 and 1992, which investigated the social construction and regulation of masculinities in a state secondary school. Most of the material in Chapters 1–4 comes from a cohort who were year 11 students during the 1990–91 school year. On many fronts, men and women are actively redefining what it means to be male.

The making of men: Masculinities, sexual-ities, and schooling. Buckingham, Great Britain: Open University Press. Schnarch, D. M. (1991). epartment of Family and Consumer SciencesWestern Michigan UniversityMichigan.

Andreas G. Philaretou. Published: 1 October 2004. by Springer (Kluwer Academic Publishers). With following keyword. Metaphors Men. studs. Andreas G.

Peter F. Murphy's purpose in this book is not to shock but rather to educate, provoke d. Show more.

Reveals the insidious effects of the language men use to speak about manhood. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Peter F. Murphy's purpose in this book is not to shock but rather to educate, provoke d
Reviews: 2
Nagor
I thank the author for writing this book, and believe the topic is very valuable. My one disappointment with the book is that (and I am still reading it) I am finding the tone to be more academic and dry than I expected. Almost as if it were written as a dissertation or scholarly article.....to be fair though, the author does (bravely) give us examples from his own life and upbringing, and stories - so he does try to balance out the more scholarly statistics and language.. However, as a man, you probably have to be seeking out this type of subject in order to even bother reading. Many men will likely be offended by the very subject. Unlike one of the reviewers, I did not take this as male-bashing at all, and I am very sensitive to that. What the author is trying to do, is examine how our collective language and typical male-bonding experiences both reflect and perpetuate a kind of socially-manufactured idea of masculinity that in some cases is not healthy nor even good for us as men. If you miss that point then you will just see the book as a sort of pro-feminist rallying cry, which it is not. For instance, much of our sexual culture - including pornography, T.V., movies, locker room talk and the like - push men into a type of mold that strips love and intimacy from sex and instead makes sex more about performance, conquest, and domination. You may not see this or accept it as a premise, but that is what the author is trying to make us recognize and take a closer look at. I wish there were more books like this, just a little less dry in writing style with less statistics, less author quotes, and more stories.
Ffyan
Peter F. Murphy's Studs, Tools, and the Family Jewels: Metaphors Men Live By, is a readable, provocative, and courageous book assessing one critical aspect of male discourse, the metaphors of masculinity which shape the way many men live their lives. What makes Murphy's book exceptional is that he goes beyond mere documentation of the widely-recognized fact that men's discourse involves many sexist and homophobic metaphors and commendably probes the influence these metaphors have in shaping the prevailing, albeit limited, view of manhood. In doing so, he addresses the usual suspects and includes discussions of metaphors such as "hard-on," "pecker," "family jewels," "jock," "blue balls," "faggot," and "pussy." This engaging book also features chapters on the use of these metaphors in most aspects of men's lives, including work, play, war, sports, humor and even in some males' revealing defensive defense of exclusive heterosexuality.
Murphy maintains these metaphors are often employed politically to distinguish privileged masculinity from its alleged inferiors, femininity and non-heterosexuality. He provocatively concludes that these metaphors while revealing much about men's relationships with women and non-heterosexual men, tell, ever so sadly, still more about the detachment, fear, distrust, and anxiety reflected in the desperate lives of many men. Murphy admirably seeks to mitigate the negative consequences of this phenomenon by offering an alternative version of the meaning of manhood, an alternative boldly calling, in part, for new metaphors by which men can be encouraged and influenced, by the language they use, to lead more humane, sensitive, fulfilled and fulfilling lives.
Not all readers will agree that dramatic changes in gender and male-to-male relationships will be fostered by Murphy's proffered revision of the many metaphors in male discourse. As Murphy is aware (see p. 5), he is likely dealing with a symptom of dysfunctional masculinity and not its primary or major cause. And yet, his response to that criticism is well- reasoned as he maintains that while language does not "determine" men's objectification of women (and homophobia, for that matter) "it describes it in a way that gives it legitimacy. How we talk about ourselves as men can alter the way we live as men."
Finally, some readers might find this book disturbing. Murphy throws down a dual challenge to males to both question their privileged status sustained by the continued use of traditional metaphors and to adopt a more "non-hard," tender and embracing discourse. Meeting the latter challenge must involve men willing to champion the use of new metaphors which might, in turn, make these non-traditional males easy preys, vulnerable and open to ridicule by those traditional males still trapped by the old metaphors underlying male dominance. Murphy boldly asks us to join him in meeting this challenge, noting:
"[I]n proposing alternative metaphors that are "unhard,' I open myself up to mockery. Men need to take these kinds of risks, however, risks that women in the feminist movement have been taking for decades (even centuries) as a way to confront what is touted as natural and normal. If men are to participate authentically in the struggle to change the way we think about masculinity and femininity, to move the discourse beyond the oppressive and the demeaning, we too must take some risks."
In the quest for saner and richer relationships between and among men and women, heterosexuals and homosexuals, all challenges calling us to that noble end are to be commended and that is decisively so regarding Murphy's challenge.
John Massaro
Professor of Politics, SUNY Postdam
SUNY Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1996