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ISBN:0684811944
Author: Edward Humes
ISBN13: 978-0684811949
Title: No Matter How Loud I Shout: A Year in the Life of Juvenile Court
Format: lit docx azw txt
ePUB size: 1517 kb
FB2 size: 1879 kb
DJVU size: 1695 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (March 5, 1996)
Pages: 400

No Matter How Loud I Shout: A Year in the Life of Juvenile Court by Edward Humes



Dewey Decimal Classification Number: 36. /6/09794 20. Personal Name: Humes, Edward. Publication, Distribution, et. New York On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book No matter how loud I shout : a year in the life of Juvenile Court, Edward Humes.

In an age when violence and crime by young people is again on the rise, No Matter How Loud I Shout offers a rare look inside the juvenile court system that deals with these children and the impact decisions made in the courts had on the rest of their lives. Weaving together a poignant, compelling narrative with razor-sharp investigative reporting, No Matter How Loud I Shout is a convincingly reported, profoundly disturbing discussion of the Los Angeles juvenile court’s failings, providing terrifying evidence of the system’s inability to slow juvenile crime or to make even a reasonable stab at rehabilitating troubled young offenders. Humes draws an alarming portrait of a judicial system in disarray.

That said, No Matter How Loud I Shout is very well-written, and it comes off like a series of stories rather than a simple piece of investigative journalism. This book’s style made it easy to read, even when the content made it a challenge.

Used this book for a class on the inadequacies of the juvenile legal system in rehabilitating youth. It was a wonderful book that gave a first hand description of going through the judicial system and incarceration of youth. 3 people found this helpful. I was not expecting to become so emotionally attached! This book is amazing but terribly sad. It sheds light on some of the glaring problems in the juvenile justice system.

The book begins by explaining that prior to the 1960s juvenile offenders were almost entirely at the mercy of the judge before which they appeared-they were not entitled to the same rights as adults. These conditions allowed an Arizona judge to sentence a teenager-without allowing him to plead the fifth and without his accuser appearing in court-to a six year term for making an obscene phone call. Three years later the Supreme Court intervened and overturned the conviction, ruling that juveniles could not face sentences more severe than those faced by adults. This book is a in depth look at the juvenile court system from many different perspectives including the children, who are children in age only.

Humes is most involved in the juvenile court of Judge Roosevelt Dorn, whose controversial ideas about how to run juvenile cases cause serious conflicts between his court, the district attorney's office and the public defender's department. Many juveniles are sent directly to adult court rather than being tried as juveniles. Political controversy surrounds all of the policies in the juvenile justice system. In the conservative resurgence of the mid-nineties, a number of "get-tough" laws and regulations are passed in California that send a number of juveniles to adult court that didn't deserve it. However, the laws were prompted in part by another one of the juveniles, Ronald Duncan, a sociopath who brutally murdered two of his co-workers and showed no remorse.

This book represents a year of observation of-and, at times, participation in-the juvenile justice system. It is the story of children, families, and professionals who inhabit the juvenile courthouses of Los Angeles, where the courses of young lives are profoundly altered every day, mostly in secret and only occasionally for the better. No facts have been changed. Two factors made this book possible. But a foot in the door is only a start; I also relied upon the courage, insight, and generosity of many people who labor within the system and who have come to believe that secrecy is harming, not protecting, their life’s work.

again on the rise, No Matter How Loud I Shout offers a rare look inside. This book is fast-paced, eye-opening and so very well written that I just couldn't put it down. Edward Humes takes you on a marvelous, often maddening, trip inside the secret world of juvenile court. In another writer's hands, this could have been a dull story. But No Matter How Loud I Shout swept me up from the very first page.

Edward Humes’s book, No Matter How Loud I Shout, follows the life of seven teenage boys who are working their way through the juvenile justice system and also serving time for their crimes. No Matter How Loud I Shout provides a clear and vivid picture in readers mind about the juvenile system and how it operates. In this book, No Matter How Loud I Shout, certain questions come to the readers mind such as, Is Judge Dorn being authoritative enough with the punishments he gives to the juveniles? and other questions such as Where should prevention efforts come from?

A journalist's profile of a juvenile court and its judges, lawyers, probation officers, and children focuses on five specific troubled minors and reveals the system's impact on their lives and their prospects. 25,000 first printing.
Reviews: 7
watchman
Much like Mr. Humes' "Monkey Girl," he combines great writing and outstanding investigative work to produce a must read book. To say that the current approach in dealing with children is disfunctional would be putting it mildly. A chronically underfunded juvenile system, a short-sighted or unaware populace and no political will to fix this huge cancer is very well depicted in the author's book. Most of the repeat offenders, identified in the system as Sixteen Percenters, know full well how laughably arbitrary and ineffective justice is meted out to them. Though the scenes depicted are about the Los Angeles' juvenile court system, it is indicative of a national problem. Even in my very low crime-rate state of Maine, people who have worked within our juvenile-court system have said that Mr. Humes analysis is right on the money. Though it was published in 1996, his reporting holds up to today's zeitgeist. The book was extremely compelling, but so infuriating that I could barely see straight. If you'll excuse me, I'm going to go hug my two young sons, now.
Slowly writer
Used this book for a class on the inadequacies of the juvenile legal system in rehabilitating youth. It was a wonderful book that gave a first hand description of going through the judicial system and incarceration of youth
Androlhala
this book is an eye-opening and honest look at how the juvenile justice system works and its many failings. humes really examines all the pieces of the puzzle and gives unbiased portrayals of how it all plays out. he deals with specific cases and then follows the children through out the process. some get lost and some make it, but many never escape the system despite the work they do. it is riveting and hard to read- especially knowing that there is little that can be done without a lot of hard work and funding. i highly suggest everyone read it; whether they are going into politics, criminology, psychology, or just interested in the process.
Keramar
I got this book for a class. We didn't read the whole thing (just excerpts) but it was an eye opening look at the complexity of our juvenile system. It's not simply because they are bad kids thus they are where they are. As in most things in life... what's at the surface does not begin to describe the real core issues that toss kids from system to system. Definitely recommend this book to anyone working with kids and those interested in understanding social issues!
Wnex
Great book. Good for high school level
Reighbyra
NMHLIS was written back in 1996. I don't know how much things have changed since, but I can't imagine they're that much better. The difference is that nowadays, a kid who habitually beats up adults and steals their handbags isn't going to be protected by juvenile barriers. They'll try him as an adult and he'll do time.

The justice system in this portrayal is torn between adult and child attitudes. If the kid is tried as a juvenile for theft, he'll end up in a youth facility until adulthood, so if he's 16, he could be in there until he's 21, and that's 5 years! In the adult court, he'd get 6 months, but at the risk of being in an adult prison, where he can be severely exploited or killed.

Around this time, Judge Judy Sheindlin wrote "Don't Pee On My Leg and Tell Me It's Raining," about her experiences as a juvenile court judge. The NYC family court was a "criminal college" where kids committed violent crimes, went to youth facilities, came out, went back to their terrible neighborhoods, and back to where they started. NYC had a string of out-of-control killings committed by teenagers, all of whom were repeatedly in trouble. But for murder, the cases had to be moved to adult court, and these kids eventually ended up in adult jail.

In "Scared Straight" a convict tells the kids "you're like a dog that keeps pissing on the carpet, after a while the judge doesn't know what to do with you anymore." These kids in NMHLIS would eventualy end up serving long sentences in jail. The judges had thrown up their hands and said "I don't know what to do with you anymore!"
Kazigrel
Needed it for my college sociology class. Cheaper than buying in bookstore. It's a good read, but when you read about Judge Dorn, you want to strangle him. If you do more research on him and see what he's been up too since this book has been written, a little justice for him has been done.
I purchased this book as a required textbook for my juvenile delinquency class. I was not expecting to become so emotionally attached! This book is amazing but terribly sad. It sheds light on some of the glaring problems in the juvenile justice system. Worth every penny.