» » The Business of Alchemy
Download The Business of Alchemy epub book
ISBN:0691015996
Author: Pamela H. Smith
ISBN13: 978-0691015996
Title: The Business of Alchemy
Format: lrf mbr rtf docx
ePUB size: 1964 kb
FB2 size: 1761 kb
DJVU size: 1966 kb
Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Princeton University Press (May 5, 1997)
Pages: 320

The Business of Alchemy by Pamela H. Smith



Smith follows the career of Johann Joachim Becher (1635-1682) from university to court, his projects from New World colonies to an old-world Pansophic Panopticon, and his ideas from alchemy to economics.

Pamela Smith's work, "The Business of Alchemy", has a rather startling thesis. We all know that throughout history alchemy and empirical science have been considered seperate, and as soon as such men as Newton and Darwin came along, psuedosciences such as alchemy disappeared lost all credability. As Pamela Smith explains, that notion is ahistorical. The only problem with this book is that it is boring. I had trouble finishing even a single sentances without being bored. In conclusion, she should write more books about the history of science in Early Modern Europe.

The Business of Alchemy - Pamela H. Smith. Page 1 of 1. Close Dialog.

Agrarian society regarded merchants with suspicion as the nonproductive exploiters of others' labor; however, territorial princes turned to commerce for revenue as the cost of maintaining the state increased. Placing Becher's career in its social and intellectual context, Smith shows how he attempted to help his.

In pursuing this narrative, she focuses on that ideal prey of the cultural historian, an intellectual of the second rank whose career and ideas typify those of a generation. Pamela H. Smith is the Seth Low Professor of History and Director of the Center for Science and Society at Columbia University. More about this book. Winner of the 1995 Pfizer Most Outstanding Book Award, History of Science Society.

Pamela H. Smith is a historian of science specializing in attitudes to nature in early modern Europe (1350-1700), with particular attention to craft knowledge and the role of craftspeople in the Scientific Revolution. She is the Seth Low Professor of History, founding director of the Making and Knowing Project, founding director of the Center for Science and Society, and chair of the Presidential Scholars in Society and Neuroscience, all at Columbia University  . Smith was selected as a John S. Guggenheim Foundation fellow in 1997-1998.

The business of alchemy Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The business of alchemy from your list? The business of alchemy. science and culture in the Holy Roman Empire. Published 1994 by Princeton University Press in Princeton, .

Volume 29 Issue 1. Smith, English Français. The British Journal for the History of Science. Smith, The Business of Alchemy: Science and Culture in the Holy Roman Empire. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1994. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site.

The Business of Alchemy: Science and Culture in the Holy Roman Empire.

In The Business of Alchemy, Pamela Smith explores the relationships among alchemy, the court, and commerce in order to illuminate the cultural history of the Holy Roman Empire in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In showing how an overriding concern with religious salvation was transformed into a concentration on material increase and economic policies, Smith depicts the rise of modern science and early capitalism. In pursuing this narrative, she focuses on that ideal prey of the cultural historian, an intellectual of the second rank whose career and ideas typify those of a generation. Smith follows the career of Johann Joachim Becher (1635-1682) from university to court, his projects from New World colonies to an old-world Pansophic Panopticon, and his ideas from alchemy to economics. Teasing out the many meanings of alchemy for Becher and his contemporaries, she argues that it provided Becher with not only a direct key to power over nature but also a language by which he could convince his princely patrons that their power too must rest on liquid wealth.

Agrarian society regarded merchants with suspicion as the nonproductive exploiters of others' labor; however, territorial princes turned to commerce for revenue as the cost of maintaining the state increased. Placing Becher's career in its social and intellectual context, Smith shows how he attempted to help his patrons assimilate commercial values into noble court culture and to understand the production of surplus capital as natural and legitimate. With emphasis on the practices of natural philosophy and extensive use of archival materials, Smith brings alive the moment of cultural transformation in which science and the modern state emerged.