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ISBN:0863162592
Author: Samuel Cotton
ISBN13: 978-0863162596
Title: Silent Terror: A Journey into Contemporary African Slavery
Format: azw lit mobi lrf
ePUB size: 1849 kb
FB2 size: 1901 kb
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Language: English
Category: Social Sciences
Publisher: Writers & Readers; First Edition edition (February 15, 1999)
Pages: 170

Silent Terror: A Journey into Contemporary African Slavery by Samuel Cotton



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An African-American, his commitment is plainly sincere ("I had found my history. I had found my future. Slavery - the crude ownership of a person and his exploitation like a beast of burden - has two major venues in the contemporary world, Sudan and Mauritania. The Sudanese practice results in large part from a war conducted by Muslims against Christians; when the former conquer the latter, they frequently enslave them (and often convert them to Islam).

Slavery - the crude ownership of a person and his exploitation like a beast of burden - has two major venues in the contemporary world, Sudan and Mauritania. by Samuel Cotton New York: Harlem River Press, 1998. Translations of this item: French.

Samuel Cotton is the first Columbia University School of Social Work's Musher International Fellow. candidate and teaches . Social Welfare Policy at Columbia University. Учредители: НП Научно-аналитический центр "Этноэкономика", Общество с ограниченной ответственностью "Апробация". Электронная почта:infobacia. ru Телефон: +7 989 669 15 151. AT-A-GLANCE 2019 Monthly Wall Calendar, 11 x 8-1//2, Small, Wirebound, Paige /(W1141-709/) 11 x 8-1//2 ACCO Brands W1141-709-19.

Silent Terror is the disturbing story of a black American's journey into the horrors of modern-day slavery in Africa. The author's odyssey takes him from New York to the Islamic Republic of Mauritania, where he comes face to face with the Arab-Berbers' centuries-old practice of enslaving black Africans.

He presents us with his book, SILENT TERROR – A Journey Into Contemporary African Slavery. This book was published in 1998, which records his undercover journey into Mauritania, at extreme danger to his life, and actually witnessed, and interviewed present and former Afrikan slaves there, gives the best analyses of the present situation, and shows how it is all cloaked under the auspices of Islam. Brother Cotton states in his vitally important book, "It is especially important for me to see that those who worship Islam, whether they are white or black, say or do something about the abuse and enslavement of their black spiritual brothers and sisters. Of course, this could be continued, but I don't want to leave out the Christians.

Silent Terror: A Journey into Contemporary African Slavery, by Samuel Cotton. Islam's Black Slaves: The Other Black Diaspora, by Ronald Segal.

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Cotton first learned of the existence of slavery in contemporary Mauritania and Sudan from writings of the American Anti-Slavery Group in the early 1990s. His conscience was profoundly disturbed, and in 1994 he became a reporter for the City Sun, an African American weekly newspaper published in Brooklyn. Cotton was assigned to investigate and write a series of articles on allegations that black Africans were being enslaved by Arabs in the two North African countries. Those testimonies formed the basis of a documentary film and a book, Silent Terror: A Journey into Contemporary African Slavery (1998). Silent Terror was recognized as a powerful, truthful, and passionate indictment of slavery in Mauritania and soon became widely used as a college text.

Documents the Arab-Berbers' continuing practice of Black African slavery in Mauritania
Reviews: 7
Onoxyleili
...an excellent book that begins to examine the very complex nature of politics and people on the diverse continent of Africa. I applaude the author's courage at bringing the issue to the attention of our government and hope that he continues his work. Mr. Cotton's book should be required reading for students of African as it will give them a beginner's view of what this wonderful, but yet frustrated, part of the world has to offer.
I would have given this work 3 stars but for the author's balanced treatment of the well researched issues inside Mauritania. I thought his work, and this book, lessened by Mr. Cotton's efforts to readdress the issue of slavery from within the contexts and expectations of what he wanted Africa to be. Likewise, it has been my experience that the notion of African brotherhood simply doesn't exist here in the manner that some stateside pundits wish it to be. Although African American leaders will espouse this rhetoric for their own political ends, the truth is, I've never really seen it.
Lastly, my family and I have lived in Africa for nearly two decades now and I believe that the author would do well to spend some more time looking in other corners and countries. My wife and I have traveled extensively across this continent and I hope that Mr. Cotton continues his work of exposing social inequities in Africa. There are a whole lot more stories out here Mr. Cotton but I don't know that you'll like what you see. Many of them are worse than those you've described in your book...are you ready to see it from their eyes?
Anaragelv
Samuel Cotton's account of his own awakening to the issues of slavery in Africa falls into four sections.
1/ The commissioning of a journalistic article, which leads him to examine available documentary evidence about slavery in Mauritania,
2/ A trip to see for himself,
3/ His return to the US, where he delivered evidence to a US Congressional sub-committee.
4/ A call to arms.
An African-American, his commitment is plainly sincere ("I had found my history. I had found my future. I had found myself.") He has achievements to show for it - his own anti-slavery organisation "CASMAS", and success in changing official US policy through a Congressional resolution based on evidence gained from his field trip.
In giving voice to the people that he met in bondage in Mauritania and Senegal, he has borne witness to lives that need and deserve all the help they can get.
He also accurately identifies the failure of so many Muslims of otherwise good standing to put pressure on regimes that nod and wink at the practices of slavery. Sudan is an appalling offender through its sponsorship of slave-raiding militias that attack the black, Christian South.
But it is Sam Cotton's very emotiveness - understandable as it might be - that weakens his argument. He is guilty of extreme sloppiness. At one point he accuses the US Ambassador to Mauritania, among others, of having their silence "bought" by "plenty of envelopes passing under the table" from the Islamic government. This is a scandalous charge, which if proven would have the Ambassador doing time in jail, but Cotton offers no evidence whatsoever to support it. It is purely an expression of his frustration.
And while he resolutely stands by his evidence that Arabs still persist with chattel slavery in Mauritania, he quickly dismisses evidence that black Africans also keep black African slaves. "It is a thing of the past...a charge that does not stand up to inspection," he insists, refusing to apply the same tests (are they paid? are their children educated?) that he applies to the "slaves" of Arabs.
On the material Cotton (and others before him) have gathered, Mauritania certainly has a case to answer that slavery still exists. Furthermore, it should be required to answer it, and the world should not tolerate any fudging.
Cotton has added something to the fund of knowledge, and deserves acknowledgment for that. But his writing is too cliche-ridden, too unexamined, too hasty in seeing what it wants to see. And Cotton, inexperienced in African conditions, also overlooks another reality of life on that continent. People do what they must to survive. Millions work in terrible conditions for no cash return. Millions of their children go without food, let alone education. I little doubt slavery exists in Mauritania. I have seen it myself, and written about it, in Sudan. Beating it, however, requires a discipline of approach that is not enough in evidence in this otherwise worthy account.
Hirah
Slavery - the crude ownership of a person and his exploitation like a beast of burden - has two major venues in the contemporary world, Sudan and Mauritania. The Sudanese practice results in large part from a war conducted by Muslims against Christians; when the former conquer the latter, they frequently enslave them (and often convert them to Islam). Mauritania has no war and no religion other than Islam-it close to being a purely Muslim country - but it does have a racial divide of (light-skinned) Arabs and (dark-skinned) "Negro-Africans," as they are known. Out of a total population of some 2 million, some tens of thousands of Mauritanians are enslaved. When Cotton, a graduate student at Columbia University and part-time journalist, learned about this situation, it horrified and absorbed him. His short but intense trip to Mauritania in early 1996 showed him first-hand of the existence of this foul institution; and as a black American, he felt the servitude of the black Mauritanians with special poignancy. Cotton began his researches as a reporter, thinking that the mere exposure of facts would affect other African-Americans much as they did himself, as they startled at the racism and servitude in Mauritania, somewhat akin to the experience of their own ancestors. But they did not. He found that black leaders (Louis Farrakhan, mainstream black American Muslims, former congressman Mervyn Dymally, and academics at Howard University) not only pooh-pooh the issue but in many cases actively apologize for the slave system. So he became an activist. Thus far, he has found, even his seeming successes, such as passing a NAACP resolution condemning slavery, turned out to have no operational significance.
Cotton's account of the Mauritanian scene is harrowing, his personal story moving, and his report on African-American reactions depressing. Some two centuries after the great American abolitionist effort, a new iteration is needed, this time focusing on the Muslim world.
Middle East Quarterly, December 1999