» » The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson (American Presidency Series)
Download The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson (American Presidency Series) epub book
ISBN:0700605231
Author: Kendrick A. Clements
ISBN13: 978-0700605231
Title: The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson (American Presidency Series)
Format: txt mbr docx rtf
ePUB size: 1594 kb
FB2 size: 1543 kb
DJVU size: 1688 kb
Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: University Press of Kansas (March 23, 1992)
Pages: 320

The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson (American Presidency Series) by Kendrick A. Clements



As a series (this is the third in the series that I have read, Andrew Jackson and Harry S. Truman being the others) American Presidency histories are usually close to 300 pages in length, and thoroughly present the events and leadership of the subject. Clements has kept the tradition with his writing. President Wilson is presented from beginning to end as a man committed to his faith and determined to lead according to moral principles, often unwilling to compromise, sometimes stubborn almost to a fault, yet desirous of making the best decisions possible. If you like to read histories that present the most important stories of history in a reasonable length book, Clements' book will be satisfying and illuminating to you as well. If you like a massive amount of details, you might, like I do, wish to follow this book with a larger and more in depth presentation.

Start by marking The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson (American Presidency) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Historian Kendrick Clements analyzes the reasons for Wilson's successes and failures in both domestic and foreign arenas, and investigates representative administrative departments to find out how the Wilson administration actually worked. Drawing upon the latest secondary literature and recently discovered medical records, Clements also reexamines the impact of Wilson's illness on his diplomatic and domestic leadership in the last year and a half of his presidency.

Part of the American Presidency Series Series). by Kendrick A. Clements. The best of presidents seem to serve in the worst of times, and Woodrow Wilson is no exception. Like Lincoln, Wilson was charged with leading the United States through a war of unprecedented scale. And like Lincoln, he is considered one of the half-dozen best presidents the country has ever had. From 1913-1921, Wilson grappled with momentous issues: domestic reform, war, and peace.

Historian Kendrick Clements analyzes the reasons for Wilson's successes and failures in both domestic and foreign arenas, and investigates representative administrative departments to find out how the Wilson administration actually worked

by Clements, Kendrick . 1939-. Publication date 1992. Topics Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924, Wilson, Woodrow, 1856-1924, Politieke situatie. org on March 17, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Kendrick A. The presidency of Woodrow Wilson Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The presidency of Woodrow Wilson from your list? The presidency of Woodrow Wilson. Published 1992 by University Press of Kansas in Lawrence, Kan. American presidency series, American Presidency series. xvi, 303 p. ; 23 cm. Number of pages.

Woodrow Wilson: World Statesman by Kendrick Clements was published in 1987. Clements is a retired professor of American history at the University of South Carolina. In 1992 he authored a detailed study of the Wilson presidency and has written biographies of Herbert Hoover, William Jennings Bryan and James Byrnes. Although this book is not a member of the American Presidents Series it exhibits many of the characteristics of biographies in that collection. It is relatively brief (with 224 pages), extremely straightforward and quite readable. And in an austere, no frills style it is packed with salient facts and observations about Wilson’s life and presidency.

His third book, entitled Division and Reunion, was published in 1893. It became a standard university textbook for teaching mid- and late-19th century . In 1897, Houghton Mifflin published Wilson's biography on George Washington; Berg describes it as "Wilson's poorest literary effort. Wilson's fourth major publication, a five-volume work entitled History of. the American People, was the culmination of a series of articles written for Harper's, and was published in 1902. Main article: Presidency of Woodrow Wilson.

The presidency of Woodrow Wilson began on March 4, 1913 at noon when Woodrow Wilson was inaugurated as President of the United States, and ended on March 4, 1921. Wilson, a Democrat, took office as the 28th . President after winning the 1912 presidential election, gaining a large majority in the Electoral College and a 42% plurality of the popular vote in a four–candidate field. Wilson was re-elected in 1916, defeated Republican Charles Evans Hughes by a fairly narrow margin.

The best of presidents seem to serve in the worst of times, and Woodrow Wilson is no exception. Like Lincoln, Wilson was charged with leading the United States through a war of unprecedented scale. And like Lincoln, he is considered one of the half-dozen best presidents the country has ever had.From 1913-1921, Wilson grappled with momentous issues: domestic reform, war, and peace. His administration did much to shape twentieth century America—from establishing the U.S. as the preeminent world power to reforming banking practices, from lowering trade barriers to establishing the federal income tax.The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson is the best one-volume study available on this very productive presidency. Historian Kendrick Clements analyzes the reasons for Wilson's successes and failures in both domestic and foreign arenas, and investigates representative administrative departments to find out how the Wilson administration actually worked. Drawing upon the latest secondary literature and recently discovered medical records, Clements also reexamines the impact of Wilson's illness on his diplomatic and domestic leadership in the last year and a half of his presidency.
Reviews: 6
Hirah
The Democratic Party as we know it today begins here—with the presidency of Woodrow Wilson. Until the 1912 presidential election, the Democrats had been the party of Jefferson and Jackson, of small government, states’ rights, the party against centralized banks and organized labor and, when it came to business monopolies and trusts, decidedly laissez faire. Beginning with the presidency of Woodrow Wilson, that changed. The Progressive Era started by William McKinley and took flight with Theodore Roosevelt, was embraced and expanded by our 28th president. “The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson” by Hendrick A. Clements, is a tale of two presidential terms--the highly successful first term involving Wilson’s progressive domestic agenda, and his less-than-stellar second term involving Wilson’s foreign policy. While he admires Woodrow Wilson, Professor Clements isn’t bashful about examining his shortcomings. Clements' writing is crisp and brisk, ever advancing the narrative.

Woodrow Wilson was a man of exceptional intellect, and the first and only president with a doctorate degree (in political science). While a bit stiff and humorless, Wilson had charisma and could be extremely persuasive. He moved up quickly through the ranks of college professors. From 1902 to 1910 he served as president of Princeton University, establishing a reputation as a reform-minded thinker. Recruited by the Democratic Party of New Jersey, he won election as state governor 1910. In 1912, a political novice just two years removed from academia, Wilson was nominated for president by the Democrats. In a three-way race with Roosevelt and incumbent William Taft, Wilson ascended to the presidency in only the second election of his life.

Wilson received a heavy assist from "The People's Lawyer," crusading reformer (and future Supreme Court Justice) Louis Brandeis. If Wilson had any doubt about his progressive vision for American, Brandeis encourage his message and helped to push his reform agenda through Congress. Among the progressive bills passed: the Federal Reserve Act, which greatly enhanced the government’s ability to control the nation’s money supply; the creation of the Federal Trade Commission, designed to guarantee fairness in the way the nation’s goods and services were bought and sold; and a law outlawing child labor. Another bill mandated an eight-hour day for railway workers and another (Underwood Simmons) reduced the tariffs on imports and established the first graduated federal income tax. On top of that, Wilson pushed through legislation to outlaw deceptive business practices and to provide low-cost long-term mortgages to farmers. Wilson also was an outspoken advocate of women’s suffrage, a position that helped ratify the 20th Amendment, giving women the right to vote. Also, he instituted the first regular White House press conferences, and he inaugurated the tradition of presidents addressing Congress in person, rather than issuing a prepared written statement.

Wilson’ second term was dominated by the conduct of World War I and his efforts to bring lasting world peace. America’s entrance into the war helped turn the tide against Germany, which surrendered in November 1918. Wilson was alone among European allies in opposition to the punitive reparations that the Treaty of Versailles imposed on Germany. A part of the treaty included Wilson’s plan for the formation of a League of Nations to adjudicate future international conflicts. In the end, the French and British allies refused to yield on the issue of reparations and the U.S. Senate failed to ratify the treaty, dooming Wilson’s League of Nations.

Wilson has come under fire in recent years for his racism, including his unconscionable re-segregation of several federal agencies, an act that destroyed the careers of a number of African American civil servants. This is shameful. Another dark spot on Wilson’s presidency was his handling of communist advocates within the U.S. borders. His attorney general, A. Mitchell Palmer, took strong measures to crush so-called subversive activities. The Palmer Raids, along with other administration actions (such as imprisoning the socialist leader Eugene Debs) have been much reviled by civil libertarians.

No president is perfect, as Wilson’s presidency certainly attests. He accomplished a great deal, and made some egregious errors. Wilson was never wildly popular as president, and his reputation among admiring historians has cooled somewhat in recent years. Professor Clements gives Wilson his due, and fairly I believe. Currently, Wilson is rated eighth on the list of presidential greatness.
Dugor
In his presentation of "The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson", Kendrick A. Clements has continued the American Presidency series' tradition of bringing history to life in an interesting, satisfying and informative way. As a series (this is the third in the series that I have read, Andrew Jackson and Harry S. Truman being the others) American Presidency histories are usually close to 300 pages in length, and thoroughly present the events and leadership of the subject. Clements has kept the tradition with his writing. President Wilson is presented from beginning to end as a man committed to his faith and determined to lead according to moral principles, often unwilling to compromise, sometimes stubborn almost to a fault, yet desirous of making the best decisions possible. Yet, for all his good intentions, and good ideas, Wilson was often his own worst enemy. He was often naive about the "good intentions" of business, citizens and nations. Yet, he has come to be considered one of our "near great" presidents by historians. How Woodrow Wilson went from his humble beginnings, to college presidency, to U.S. Presidency is a fascinating story, ably presented in this historical biography. How he ultimately fell victim to his own worst traits, due in large part to the massive stroke he suffered on October 2, 1919 is heartbreaking. How the nation continued to consider him at least marginally qualified to handle the job after such a physically devastating stroke, and how his wife Edith successfully fronted for him while he finished out his second term, with the nation largely unaware of his condition, is both controversial and amazing. I found Clements' book satisfying and illuminating on all counts.

If you like to read histories that present the most important stories of history in a reasonable length book, Clements' book will be satisfying and illuminating to you as well. If you like a massive amount of details, you might, like I do, wish to follow this book with a larger and more in depth presentation. I give "The Presidency of Woodrow Wilson" 5 stars.
Black_Hawk_Down.
Great book, provided in depth analysis of the Wilson Administration. I had to read the book for my US History class but I ended up personally enjoying the book. The book has a strong emphasis on economic policies of the Wilson Administration.
Anayanis
This book is well written and easy to read. It takes a very balanced view of Wilson's accomplishments, his philosophies, and his serious shortcomings. It convinced me to read two more books on Wilson and this era.