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Download Winning the Long War: Lessons from the Cold War for Defeating Terrorism and Preserving Freedom epub book
ISBN:0974366544
Author: Paul Rosenzweig,James Jay Carafano
ISBN13: 978-0974366548
Title: Winning the Long War: Lessons from the Cold War for Defeating Terrorism and Preserving Freedom
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ePUB size: 1366 kb
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Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: Heritage Books (April 25, 2005)
Pages: 300

Winning the Long War: Lessons from the Cold War for Defeating Terrorism and Preserving Freedom by Paul Rosenzweig,James Jay Carafano



Carafano, James Jay, 1955-. Varying Form of Title: Lessons from the Cold War for defeating terrorism and preserving freedom. In Winning the Long War, experts on homeland security, civil liberties, and economics examine current . policy and map out a long-term national strategy for the war on terrorism. Like the brilliant policy of containment articulated by the late George F. Kennan during the Cold War, this strategy balances prudent military and security measures with the need to protect civil liberties and maintain continued economic growth. Download book Winning the long war : lessons from the Cold War for defeating terrorism and preserving freedom, James Jay Carafano & Paul Rosenzweig ; foreword, Christopher Cox. online for free.

Concluding, Winning the Long War is book that ties two wars together. While decades apart and very different they require a similar battle plan. We must be careful not to allow McCarthyism of a new breed to so distort the dangers and threats so they are not taken seriously by Americans and countries of all stripes. Authors Carafano and Rosenweig present a thoughtful, provocative, and readable analysis of how America can win the war on Islamic terror. The crux of their analysis is that we must understand that, as with the cold war, the war on terror will be a strategic struggle of our ideals against theirs.

Winning the Long War book. Kennan during the Cold War, this strategy balances prudent military and security meansures with the need to protect ci In Winning the Long War, experts on homeland security, civil liberties, and economics examine current .

In Winning the Long War, experts on homeland security, civil liberties, and economics examine current . Winning the Long War also examines the weakness of a legal system which is incapable of dealing with actionable intelligence. We need a new preventive detention protocol for potential terrorists, one with more stringent standards. The measures now being used are vitally important, yet they are extralegal.

Rosenzweig and Carafano (both co-authors of the 2005 book, Winning the Long War: Lessons from the Cold War for Defeating Terrorism and Preserving Freedom ) have reservations, even as they concede a potential upside. What bothers me, though, is that, for many elites, the idea is dead on arrival. Why? There are serious threats from our adversaries in space, and this idea that has existed at least since then-Defense Secretary Don Rumsfeld recommended it in January 2001

lessons from the Cold War for defeating terrorism and preserving freedom. by James Jay Carafano. Published 2003 by Heritage Foundation, Distributed to the trade by National Book Network in Washington, DC, Lanham, Md. Written in English. Like George F. Kennan's policy of containment during the Cold War, this strategy balances prudent military and security measures with the need to protect civil liberties and maintain continued economic growth-Publisher's description. Prologue: The long shadow of the Long Telegram. Taking the offensive. Protecting the homeland. After the Patriot Act. Guns and butter. Trade in a challenging world.

Winning the Long War considers the lessons learned from the failures and successes of the Cold War and takes a comparative look at the strategies and policies, both foreign and domestic, implemented at that period in history and those taking shape during the . led war on terrorism. The authors speak from a historical perspective and recommend a holistic approach to waging the war on terrorism, steering contemporary policymakers, professionals, and citizens away from reactionary measures and toward long-term solutions. James Jay Carafano and Paul Rosenzweig, Winning the Long War: Lessons from the Cold War for Defeating Terrorism and Preserving Freedom (Washington, . The Heritage Foundation, 2005). Visiting Fellow, The Heritage Foundation.

Paul Rosenzweig is an accomplished writer and speaker with a national reputation in cyber security and homeland security. Mr. Rosenzweig is the founder of Red Branch Consulting PLLC, a homeland security consulting company, and a Senior Advisor to The Chertoff Group. Rosenzweig formerly served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy in the Department of Homeland Security. He is also a member of the Literary Society of Washington.

Winning the Long War: Lessons from the Cold War for Defeating Terrorism and Preserving Freedom (2005). GI Ingenuity: Improvisation, Technology and Winning World War II (2006). Mismanaging Mayhem: How Washington Responds to Crisis (2008). Private Sector, Public Wars: Contractors in Combat-Afghanistan, Iraq, and Future Conflicts (2008).

In Winning the Long War, experts on homeland security, civil liberties, and economics examine current U.S. policy and map out a long-term national strategy for the war on terrorism. Like the brilliant policy of containment articulated by the late George F. Kennan during the Cold War, this strategy balances prudent military and security meansures with the need to protect civil liberties and maintain continued economic growth.
Reviews: 6
Skrimpak
"Winning the Long War" was published in 2005 by the Heritage Foundation and was written by James Jay Carafano & Paul Rosenzweig. This is a superior team to be discussing the War on Terrorism and preserving freedom. Much of the debate since 9/11 has been how to preserve civil liberties while ever-increasing national security dutifully and efficiently. Carafano brings to the table his expertise on national security while Rosenzweig is a legal expert. The two are able to effectively address both fronts: the military/intelligence side to taking the fight to the enemy and ensuring that we do not disregard civil liberties that help create the foundation of the country.

The book relies heavily on the "Long Telegram" written by George Kennan to tie the Cold War and War on Terror together as the subtitle for the book states: "Lessons from the cold war for defeating terrorism and preserving freedom."

Early on the book argues that there are four pillars that the Cold War victory depended on: Provide Security, Build a Strong Economy, Protect Civil Liberties, Win the Struggle of Ideas. These are the very concepts that "Winning the Long War" argues is the path to victory in the war on terrorism. Many quarrel with the idea of looking back to the Cold War for knowledge on how to fight modern wars, for example one of the biggest arguments heard is ridding the arsenal of Cold War Era weapons and development.

The main point in this book is noted in chapter one : "The Cold War's real lessons are not how to fight the last war, but any long war. And no one should mistake the global war on terrorism as anything but a real, life-and-death struggle. It is a war by any name." This book does not depict how to battle any one specific enemy with micro-tactics, it instead shows the overall strategic or macro-tactics that are needed to fight a sustained conflict "hot" or "cold."

One decisive facet of the Cold War is just as important and relevant in today's world, the economy. In many ways it won the Cold War along with diplomacy and military strength. As the authors point out:

"Understanding the role of the economy in the long war begins with understanding the federal government's relationship with the domestic economy ... The Soviet Union's economic collapse stemmed from more than just its government's insatiable appetite for military spending. It followed at least as much from the Kremlin's determination to control economic activity in the civilian sector while ignoring the enormous costs of imposing controls. The Soviet treatment of the economy is an object lesson in how not to fight the long war."

With the many changes being made by the United States Government directly to or indirectly affecting the economy, this is a very important life lesson for fighting this millenniums long war. While the economy implications of the Cold War were known, this book does a great job of describing exactly how much impact exists and how it could either be a piece of the winning strategy or the reason we lose this new conflict against terrorism.

Concluding, Winning the Long War is book that ties two wars together. While decades apart and very different they require a similar battle plan. We must be careful not to allow McCarthyism of a new breed to so distort the dangers and threats so they are not taken seriously by Americans and countries of all stripes. However, there is every reason to have the hard conversations that enemies exist... we must properly understand how our enemy fights in order to defeat him.

Winning the Long War is a terrific blueprint for such conversations. It is not filled with military jargon, nor is it a 1,000 page dry Government study. It is a study done in a manner to use history to teach in plain English what we all should look for and encourage in order to protect our liberty and defeat terrorism.
Cel
Authors Carafano and Rosenweig present a thoughtful, provocative, and readable analysis of how America can win the war on Islamic terror. The crux of their analysis is that we must understand that, as with the cold war, the war on terror will be a strategic struggle of our ideals against theirs. We will win against the enemy's asymmetric forces because our democratic, libertarian ideals empower us and because of the endurance of our robust capitalist economy. The authors show that while there is much that we can do to strengthen our capabilities, the tumult of democratic discussion will also produce many ideas which could actually weaken us were they to become policy. This book is principally about making the right choices.

Eisenhower's approach to the Cold War provides lessons that will not have to be re-learned, provided they are remembered: provide security, build a strong economy, protect civil liberties, and win the struggle of ideas. What Carafano and Rosenweig offer are the nuts and bolts of how these concepts become counter-terrorist policy. We already have the fundamentals in place, but we will have to adapt to a new enemy. Their suggestions include replacing the Unified Command Plan with a U. S. Engagement Plan, crafted by and reporting to the National Security Council rather than the Pentagon. And since redundancy must be built into any plan, they offer their concept of "layered security" to prevent attacks on our homeland. And as might be expected, the authors offer several ways to improve the Department of Homeland Security. The present incarnation results from a "scattershot, partisan" approach by Congress, making the DHS little more than an "intelligence end-user," or worse, just another entitlement program. The alternative: performance and threat-based funding.

Winning the Long War also examines the weakness of a legal system which is incapable of dealing with actionable intelligence. We need a new preventive detention protocol for potential terrorists, one with more stringent standards. The measures now being used are vitally important, yet they are extralegal. We also get a thoughtful and well-documented pitch for trade versus aid as the more powerful tool of foreign policy. And some of the old Cold War tools, such as USIS, should be re-constituted and re-deployed against Islamic terror.

The authors' methodical and academic approach is a refreshing change from the bombast this topic typically engenders. This book deserves to be read and it deserves to influence American policy. I'm going to send copies of this book to my senators, Dodd and Lieberman. Why don't you send copies to yours, too?