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ISBN:0700609644
Author: William E. Unrau
ISBN13: 978-0700609642
Title: White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802-1892
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Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: University Press of Kansas (June 28, 1996)
Pages: 192

White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802-1892 by William E. Unrau



White Man’s Wicked Water is a valuable, judicious, and mercifully succinct contribution to the lengthy literature on Native American alcoholism. The author’s subject is the Indian country liquor trade of the nineteenth century. He does not deal with the Rocky Mountain or Pacific Coast liquor trade, but focuses on the south-central Great Plains. His thesis is that the trade was vast, and that it was vast because it was lucrative. We should not assume that because Indians were poor, the whiskey trade must have been marginal. Professor Unrau’s methodology is traditionally historical rather than ethnohistorical. He does not know from tribal evidence why Indians drank, or why they drank so self-destructively. Neither, really, do ethnohistorians; there are many theories, most of which Unrau rejects as racist in their assumptions.

White Man's Wicked Water. White Man's Wicked Water. The inordinate indulgence of Indians in spiritous liquors is one of the most deplorable consequences which has resulted from their intercourse with civilized ma. -Governor Lewis Cass, Michigan Territory, 1827. Often I have been compelled to ask myself, 'Who is the civilized and who is the savage?' Their principal vices are emphatically our vices. In White Man's Wicked Water, Unrau tells the compelling story of how an alcohol-sodden society introduced drink to the Indians. That same society then instituted futile policies to control the flow of alcohol to tribes who, as one superintendent put it, "have not the moral force to resist temptation.

He is the author of White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802-1892, and Mixed-Bloods and Tribal Dissolution: Charles Curtis and the Quest for Indian Identity.

His earlier study, White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802-1892 (Lawrence, KS, 1996), is the precursor to his new work on alcohol distribution in the Trans-Mississippi and Mountain West. Unrau's gift is the careful probing of complex and concomitant sociopolitical events; he establishes.

In White Man's Wicked Water, William E. Unrau addresses these issues by examining the federal government's efforts to regulate the alcohol trade in nineteenth-century Indian Country. He focuses on how par-ticular conditions in Indian Country provided the means for Indian liquor consumption and how frontier judicial processes vmdermined prohibition. Uru'au begins his study with a discussion of the prevalence of al-cohol consumption by Americans-both Indian and non-Indian-in the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

University Press of Kansas. Published by the University Press of Kansas (Lawrence, Kansas 66045), which was organized by the Kansas Board of Regents and is operated and funded by. Emporia State University, Fort Hays State University, Kansas State University, Pittsburg State University, the University of Kansas, and Wichita State University. In my first book on this topic, White Man’s Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802–1892 (1996), I focused on the duplicity and negative aspects of a hard-drinking white culture that passed legislation prohibiting Indians from. 3. procuring alcohol in any form while ignoring similar standards for itself.

White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802-1892: ISBN 9780700609642 (978-0-7006-0964-2) Softcover, University Press of Kansas, 1996. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1996. Illustrations, maps, photographs, notes, bibliography, index. From a political and economic standpoint, this book offers important information on how, working together, federal regulation and pre-dominantly non-Indian private trade shaped the context of alcohol problems in Indian country. MARIL HAZLETT Department of History. University of Kansas.

Wherever traders went, alcohol followed. Federal officials became alarmed at the continuing prospect of Indian drinking, so they enacted the Trade and Intercourse Act of 1802, which granted the president the authority to halt the sale of alcohol to Indians. Although various federal and state officials, including Thomas Jefferson, wanted to stop the flow of alcohol into Indian country, they were unable to end the business. As in the colonial period, the economics of the trade proved overwhelming to government officials. Unrau, William E. White Man's Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802–1892. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1996. Waddell, Jack . and Michael W. Everett, eds.

There is a silent revolution unfolding in Indian Country. Drinking and drunkenness, historically defined via the firewater myths as an essence and expression of one’s Indianness, are being rejected. Growing numbers of Native peoples are embracing Wellbriety (sobriety and physical, emotional and spiritual health) as an act of personal and cultural survival and resistance. This resistance movement is reflected in a recently published Native adaptation of the Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous  . Winds of Change, 8(3), 41-46. White Man’s Wicked Water: The Alcohol Trade and Prohibition in Indian Country, 1802-1892. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas. Weibel-Orlando, J. (1987).

"The inordinate indulgence of Indians in spiritous liquors is one of the most deplorable consequences which has resulted from their intercourse with civilized man."—Governor Lewis Cass, Michigan Territory, 1827 "Often I have been compelled to ask myself, 'Who is the civilized and who is the savage?' Their principal vices are emphatically our vices. If they get drunk it is upon our whiskey. . . . [A]nd yet we claim to be 'civilized' and freely deal out to them the epithet 'savage.'"—The Reverend William H. Goode, reflecting on his early 19th-century sojourn in Indian Country In White Man's Wicked Water, Unrau tells the compelling story of how an alcohol-sodden society introduced drink to the Indians. That same society then instituted futile policies to control the flow of alcohol to tribes who, as one superintendent put it, "have not the moral force to resist temptation." Unrau dispels that racial-deficiency theory and debunks the belief that prohibition was carried out by well-intended reformers. Unrau shows that, contrary to the perniciously false image of the innately "depraved savage," Indians actually learned their "uncivil" behavior by emulating—in hopes of accommodating—"civilized" men. Indian inebriation in the nineteenth century, he shows, essentially mimicked the habits of white Americans who-spurred on by prevailing attitudes and federal law-were aspiring to integrate the natives into the cultural mainstream. Prohibition zealots, intent upon soothing white anxieties, were far more concerned with this goal than with stemming the flow of alcohol. Scholars have often viewed the sale of alcohol to Native Americans as a ploy by Euro-Americans to trick them into unfair land and trade deals. But Unrau makes it clear that alcoholic consumption by Native Americans was the inevitable consequence of cultural confluence, not of conscious white subversion. To support his arguments, Unrau has closely examined previously neglected records pertaining to illicit alcohol trafficking, its tie to the land-cession/annuity-distribution system, and the influence of federal subsidy to non-Indian, western development. From these sources, he provides surprising new insights into alcohol use and abuse in relation to Indian removal. Unrau also sheds new light on nineteenth-century prohibition attempts in the trans-Missouri West (primarily Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma) up to the absolutist prohibition law of 1892.