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ISBN:0472087231
Author: Bernard Norman Grofman
ISBN13: 978-0472087235
Title: Political Science as Puzzle Solving (Interests, Identities, And Institutions In Comparative Politics)
Format: lrf doc mbr lit
ePUB size: 1420 kb
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Language: English
Category: Politics and Government
Publisher: University of Michigan Press (April 4, 2001)
Pages: 160

Political Science as Puzzle Solving (Interests, Identities, And Institutions In Comparative Politics) by Bernard Norman Grofman



Political Science as Puzz. has been added to your Cart. Series: Interests, Identities, and Institutions in Comparative Politics. Hardcover: 160 pages. Publisher: University of Michigan Press (April 4, 2001).

Start by marking Political Science as Puzzle Solving as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Each of the essays in this volume addresses a particular empirical puzzle involving decisions or outcomes that, at least on the surface, seem difficult (if not impossible) to explain

com Product Description (ISBN 0472087231, Paperback). Each of the essays in this volume addresses a particular empirical puzzle involving decisions or outcomes that, at least on the surface, seem difficult (if not impossible) to explain. Bernard Grofman is Professor of Political Science and Social Psychology, University of California, Irvine. Library descriptions.

Interests, Identities, and Institutions in Comparative Politics. In the first three essays, the authors look at the behavior of an individual or an organization such as trade union or political party that, at first blush, does not seem to make sense: Why would a political leader gamble on a vote of confidence that he didn't need to call and the failure of which would seriously harm his party's

April 14, 2010 History. found in the catalog. Bernard Norman Grofman. Political Science as Puzzle Solving (Interests, Identities, and Instit. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read.

Grofman, Bernard, ed. Political Science as Puzzle Solving: Interests, Identities, and Institutions in Comparative Politics. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2001. Blyth, Mark, and Robin Varghese. First published in 1977 in World Politics vo. 9 n. (July 1977): 489-522. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1990: 32-65.

Each of the essays in this volume addresses a particular empirical puzzle involving decisions or outcomes that, at least on the surface, seem difficult (if not impossible) to explain. In the first three essays, the authors look at the behavior of an individual or an organization such as trade union or political party that, at first blush, does not seem to make sense

Grofman, Bernard, ed. 2001. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Groves, Robert . Floyd J. Fowler, J. Mick P. Couper, James M. Lepkowski, Eleanor Singer, and Roger Tourangeau. Helmke, Gretchen, and Steven Levitsky, eds. 2006. Informal institutions and democracy: lessons from Latin America. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. Hennick, Monique M. 2007.

Introduction Comparative Politics and Political Science How Comparativists Practice Their Craft: Concepts and Methods Regime Types Tools of Analysis: Interests, Identities, and Institutions Comparative Politics and Developmental Paths A Changing Field Paths of Development Why Study Comparative Politics? 1 2 4 4 4 8 8 10 13. Two. The Framework of Analysis Jeffrey Kopstein and Mark Lichbach.

Organized to address the concerns of contemporary comparativists, the volume provides students with the conceptual tools and historical background needed to understand today's complex world politics.

Each of the essays in this volume addresses a particular empirical puzzle involving decisions or outcomes that, at least on the surface, seem difficult (if not impossible) to explain.In the first three essays, the authors look at the behavior of an individual or an organization such as trade union or political party that, at first blush, does not seem to make sense: Why would a political leader gamble on a vote of confidence that he didn't need to call and the failure of which would seriously harm his party's future prospects? Why would a trade union conduct a strike that it knows it can't win? Why didn't the Japanese Socialist party modify its platform to attract more voters so as to give it a chance of holding power in Japan? The authors show that behavior that appears irrational is not really so once we understand the full context in which the behavior is embedded.The fourth essay asks how a major empire--the Soviet empire--could have dissolved so quickly. Here the explanation involves an interesting new theory: the power of "decisive inaction." The final essay elaborates a formal model of equilibrium behavior in the social welfare system to consider the empirical puzzle of why increasing unemployment benefits often appear not to significantly increase the attractiveness of the unemployment option.The contributors are Miriam Golden, Kaare Strom, Masaru Kohno, Richard Anderson, George Tsebelis and Roland Stephen.Bernard Grofman is Professor of Political Science and Social Psychology, University of California, Irvine.